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    • Johnjones7656
    • By Johnjones7656 12th Jun 17, 9:35 AM
    • 42Posts
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    Johnjones7656
    Is it worth asking for £2,000 price drop for work discovered after survey?
    • #1
    • 12th Jun 17, 9:35 AM
    Is it worth asking for £2,000 price drop for work discovered after survey? 12th Jun 17 at 9:35 AM
    As the title reads there's follow up work to be done after the survey-these works have been quoted as £2,250. Is it worth asking for this to be deducted off the price we've offered or just suck it up and carry on??
Page 1
    • Westminster
    • By Westminster 12th Jun 17, 9:39 AM
    • 749 Posts
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    Westminster
    • #2
    • 12th Jun 17, 9:39 AM
    • #2
    • 12th Jun 17, 9:39 AM
    You can always ask - perhaps be prepared to cover 50% of the cost (or maybe even 100% depending on the vendor)
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    • juniordoc
    • By juniordoc 12th Jun 17, 9:40 AM
    • 113 Posts
    • 66 Thanks
    juniordoc
    • #3
    • 12th Jun 17, 9:40 AM
    • #3
    • 12th Jun 17, 9:40 AM
    Yes if course it's worth it, the worst that can happen is they say no.
    Your success will depend on how long the house has been on the market, how keen they are to sell/move, how much other interest they had in the property. You could improve your chances by compromising and asking for 1.5K off.
    Best of luck!
    • martindow
    • By martindow 12th Jun 17, 9:46 AM
    • 7,084 Posts
    • 3,914 Thanks
    martindow
    • #4
    • 12th Jun 17, 9:46 AM
    • #4
    • 12th Jun 17, 9:46 AM
    Surveyors always cover their backs by pointing out 'faults' that can be something and nothing.

    What are the issues that they have flagged up? Have they valued the house at the price you are paying or lower?
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 12th Jun 17, 9:56 AM
    • 59,229 Posts
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    PasturesNew
    • #5
    • 12th Jun 17, 9:56 AM
    • #5
    • 12th Jun 17, 9:56 AM
    It's complex. The work might've been obvious, e.g. new windows required... or hidden and the owners didn't know.

    Then there's the question of what's critical/urgent and what's nice to have.

    Then there's the issue of the cost you have been quoted.

    You're not buying something brand new and, depending on age, there will always be something to fix with any house, if you think it's important....

    The sellers might not be able to drop the price - nor willing - nor willing for the work you say costs £2k.

    A lot of "work required" is priced in when the Agent values the house, so has already been discounted.

    "Drive needs relaying" - would be obvious as you walked up it and whether that's done is a choice. Maybe "a drive" could be sorted for £600, nor £2k. Something like this might even be "priced in" and if the Estate Agent had walked up a brand new drive when he went to price the house up he might've suggested they put it on £5k higher.

    "Electricals are so dangerous the fire brigade would tell people not to sleep there" is critical and something that'd potentially prevent others buying it .... £2k for a full rewire might seem a reasonable price to pay to get the house sold...

    How long is a piece of string ...
    • david1951
    • By david1951 12th Jun 17, 10:03 AM
    • 339 Posts
    • 381 Thanks
    david1951
    • #6
    • 12th Jun 17, 10:03 AM
    • #6
    • 12th Jun 17, 10:03 AM
    Look at it from the seller's point of view:

    - was it all obvious stuff that the original offer took into account, or routine maintenance?

    - what are the chances of finding another buyer willing to proceed at the agreed price, or higher? This is likely in, e.g., areas of London and the South East.

    - have you annoyed the seller about other stuff, e.g., enquiries? For example, this could be the final straw that leads to them pulling out.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 12th Jun 17, 10:27 AM
    • 15,668 Posts
    • 39,175 Thanks
    FBaby
    • #7
    • 12th Jun 17, 10:27 AM
    • #7
    • 12th Jun 17, 10:27 AM
    Also consider that the price agreed already included a reduction on account of these issues.
    • Johnjones7656
    • By Johnjones7656 12th Jun 17, 12:41 PM
    • 42 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Johnjones7656
    • #8
    • 12th Jun 17, 12:41 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Jun 17, 12:41 PM
    Thanks for your advice.


    Theres issues with the chimney that the seller knew needed fixing and then an independent damp report has estimated a cost for rising damp that we didn't know about.


    We just cant work out if its worth getting a new mortgage offer if the seller agrees - is getting a new mortgage offer a hassle?
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 12th Jun 17, 1:28 PM
    • 7,885 Posts
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    teddysmum
    • #9
    • 12th Jun 17, 1:28 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Jun 17, 1:28 PM
    When my late father's bungalow was being sold, a burst pipe, in the loft, damaged plasterboard, so the buyer asked for £2000 off the price (in the 1990s when a detached bungalow sold for £50000).


    We agreed to this as we wanted probate sorted, but the buyer came better off,as he was is in the building trade and was going to demolish that part of the wall anyway (to make a larger living room ).
    • Mr da
    • By Mr da 12th Jun 17, 1:34 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 111 Thanks
    Mr da
    Most definitely worth asking. Recently had the same issue, I was going to ask if they would meet in the middle, but my mortgage advisor said ask for the full amount to be knocked off and it was.
    • Johnjones7656
    • By Johnjones7656 12th Jun 17, 1:57 PM
    • 42 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Johnjones7656
    How do you ask?? How do you word it??
    • t0rt0ise
    • By t0rt0ise 12th Jun 17, 2:08 PM
    • 2,880 Posts
    • 1,764 Thanks
    t0rt0ise
    You would usually get the estate agent to do it. That's what's happened to us selling a probate house. The buyers got the estate agent to ask for a discount. We have agreed to a smaller discount than they asked for because as others are saying most of the defects were obvious and the price reflected that, but a couple of things weren't obvious so we gave in slightly.

    I might add that some are saying that the sellers are usually desperate to get a probate house off their hands, that is not always the case and with us it's the exact opposite. We aren't in any particular rush to sell and were quite willing had they not agreed to our figure, to put the house back on the market.
    Last edited by t0rt0ise; 12-06-2017 at 2:28 PM.
    • Mr da
    • By Mr da 12th Jun 17, 2:43 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 111 Thanks
    Mr da
    I rang up their estate agent, told them what it had been valued at and work needing doing. I also emailed survey across, some say you shouldn't but it worked out OK. Though must admit I wish everything on survey had been right to save asking. But I'd definitely ask
    • Johnjones7656
    • By Johnjones7656 12th Jun 17, 4:31 PM
    • 42 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Johnjones7656
    Thanks-so would we simply say we'd like to renegotiate the price based on the quotes for the work the survey discovered?
    • martinthebandit
    • By martinthebandit 12th Jun 17, 4:37 PM
    • 3,170 Posts
    • 5,391 Thanks
    martinthebandit
    Thanks for your advice.


    ........an independent damp report has estimated a cost for rising damp
    Originally posted by Johnjones7656
    How independent was the person who did the damp report?
    Politics -
    from the words Poli, meaning many
    and tics meaning blood sucking parasites


    (thanks to Kinky Friedman (or Larry Hardman) for the quote}
    • yoshiyella
    • By yoshiyella 12th Jun 17, 4:50 PM
    • 439 Posts
    • 131 Thanks
    yoshiyella
    I would also add that it depends on where you are and how much interest there would likely be.

    I'm in London and when we sold our last house, we had dozens of offers at the asking price so if anyone had come to us asking for the discount we would have told them where to go (obviously politely) as we knew we'd get a buyer within 24 hours.
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