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  • FIRST POST
    • MrDerek
    • By MrDerek 10th Jun 17, 11:09 AM
    • 33Posts
    • 5Thanks
    MrDerek
    Selling car privately, scam?
    • #1
    • 10th Jun 17, 11:09 AM
    Selling car privately, scam? 10th Jun 17 at 11:09 AM
    I'm selling my car privately and I have one person contact me who seem a bit suspicious. He's told me he's on vacation in Germany and he's wanting to buy it for a friends birthday, then the below message, what do you think?

    I just want to know more about the item to make sure its in good condition before i proceed with the payment,so can you assure me i will not be disappointed???And also I need to inform you about this,I just received an email from my pick up agent headquarter in London...Am most sure i did not include that in my previous email,And they said they won't be coming to pick up unless we pay the agent commission fee first in order to be able to schedule a pick up time,I am so busy and can not pay the agent fees from here as they Requested that i pay them with western union So what i will do here is that i will send the payment in the total amount of £3,350.00. So once you receive the confirmation of the payment,you will deduct the promised amount for the item which is £2,800.00 and the remaining £500.00 will be send down to the agent By western union the extra £50 is main for the Western Union charges..
    I've sent him my paypal details since and I'm thinking if he sends me the money there's not much that could go wrong? Only thing I can think of is if he uses a stolen paypal account to buy my car, in which case I could verify it by getting him to send me a picture of ID or something?

    I also have a template contract for the buyer to sign (sold as seen), unsure how I could protect myself with it in this situation where the buyer is remote and not actually seeing it.

    The car itself is currently SORN with it's MOT due to run out in the next week.

    Other than the suspicious request above, only other thing that raises suspicion is he signed his initial email with "Andrew" but the email is from a "Paul".

    Any thoughts?
Page 2
    • macman
    • By macman 11th Jun 17, 9:51 AM
    • 40,879 Posts
    • 16,685 Thanks
    macman
    Sorry, but if you even think 1% that that email might be genuine, then you really shouldn't be allowed on the interweb without supervision.
    It's got every warning sign going: Western Union... garbled grammar... happy to buy a car in a hurry without seeing it...buying it for a friend...happy to pay the asking price without quibble...
    Is you car really so rare and unusual that it merits that kind of response?
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
    • macman
    • By macman 11th Jun 17, 9:52 AM
    • 40,879 Posts
    • 16,685 Thanks
    macman
    - Tells an elaborate story. Check
    - Paypal or western Union. Check

    This is a scam.

    Ask for Paypal payment and provide an address the other end of the country as a pick up point, though try to make it believable, say you have been sent there with work last miute. Make sure they waste a few pounds getting there, and then ignore all future contact.

    Of course dont ever send them any money.
    Originally posted by parking_question_chap
    But the scammer isn't ever going to collect the car, just their £500 'agent overpayment'.
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
    • LeeUK
    • By LeeUK 11th Jun 17, 12:41 PM
    • 5,409 Posts
    • 2,514 Thanks
    LeeUK
    - Tells an elaborate story. Check
    - Paypal or western Union. Check

    This is a scam.

    Ask for Paypal payment and provide an address the other end of the country as a pick up point, though try to make it believable, say you have been sent there with work last miute. Make sure they waste a few pounds getting there, and then ignore all future contact.

    Of course dont ever send them any money.
    Originally posted by parking_question_chap
    No one is ever coming for the car. They just want the £550 Western Union payment.

    As I already said above.
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 11th Jun 17, 3:29 PM
    • 753 Posts
    • 472 Thanks
    Tarambor
    That's very unlikely and I've never heard of the scammers actually coming to pick up a car. They would have to give fake details on the V5 and then avoid any ANPR cameras or police on the way back because they wouldn't be able to insure it or tax it without giving out genuine card details and address.
    Originally posted by takman
    It would still show as being taxed until DVLA processed the change of keeper. It is likely to show as still insured until you ring and cancel so there would be no need to avoid ANPR.I can guarantee you I could buy a car you've been running until I paid for it on a Sunday and drive it home that day without taxing it or insuring it myself and it wouldn't trigger a single ANPR camera because the databases would still show it as being taxed and insured. Even if it pings ANPR as untaxed or uninsured then unless that camera happens to be in a police car nothing is going to happen on the journey. They could also send a transporter, again it becomes no issue. Given the lucrative market in spares its certainly worth it for them to do.
    • takman
    • By takman 11th Jun 17, 6:51 PM
    • 2,265 Posts
    • 1,883 Thanks
    takman
    It would still show as being taxed until DVLA processed the change of keeper. It is likely to show as still insured until you ring and cancel so there would be no need to avoid ANPR.I can guarantee you I could buy a car you've been running until I paid for it on a Sunday and drive it home that day without taxing it or insuring it myself and it wouldn't trigger a single ANPR camera because the databases would still show it as being taxed and insured. Even if it pings ANPR as untaxed or uninsured then unless that camera happens to be in a police car nothing is going to happen on the journey. They could also send a transporter, again it becomes no issue. Given the lucrative market in spares its certainly worth it for them to do.
    Originally posted by Tarambor
    I've been involved in selling a couple of cars this year and I have advised them to change the keeper online which then immediately showed it as not being taxed on all three cars. Sending a transporter will mean they either have to use a legitimate company and leave a record of who they are and where it was taken too. Or if they use their own transporter it will be registered to someone and they will have to show their face to the seller.
    The higher risk usually means they target more expensive cars and using a slightly different method.

    The scam mentioned in the OP is very clearly someone who is abroad trying to get £500 through western union and will send a fake PayPal email. I can guarantee that will be it and they will not attempt to pick up the car.
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