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    • Indianground
    • By Indianground 10th Jun 17, 10:51 AM
    • 3Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Indianground
    Buying part of neighbours garden
    • #1
    • 10th Jun 17, 10:51 AM
    Buying part of neighbours garden 10th Jun 17 at 10:51 AM
    Hi,

    We have agreed to purchase a small area of our neighbours garden for £1000. I contacted the Solicitor we used for our house purchase a few years ago and they quoted us £1050 for the legal work.

    Does anyone have any idea where I could find someone to do my conveyancing more reasonably?

    Thanks
Page 1
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Jun 17, 1:00 PM
    • 22,887 Posts
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    Davesnave
    • #2
    • 10th Jun 17, 1:00 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Jun 17, 1:00 PM
    Hi,

    We have agreed to purchase a small area of our neighbours garden for £1000. I contacted the Solicitor we used for our house purchase a few years ago and they quoted us £1050 for the legal work.

    Does anyone have any idea where I could find someone to do my conveyancing more reasonably?

    Thanks
    Originally posted by Indianground
    The land will need its own title and plan, so that will have to be created. Then the existing title will have to be altered to reflect the change. The value of the plot is therefore of minor relevance.

    No harm in shopping around, by getting a couple of other quotes, or buy a book and go DIY.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 10-06-2017 at 6:58 PM. Reason: GM showed me I'd forgotten something. Embarrassing, as I've actually sold off a part plot in the last 5 years!
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • cjdavies
    • By cjdavies 10th Jun 17, 1:00 PM
    • 2,421 Posts
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    cjdavies
    • #3
    • 10th Jun 17, 1:00 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Jun 17, 1:00 PM
    Phone around other solicitors.
    • martindow
    • By martindow 10th Jun 17, 1:49 PM
    • 7,121 Posts
    • 3,938 Thanks
    martindow
    • #4
    • 10th Jun 17, 1:49 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Jun 17, 1:49 PM
    I presume you are paying the costs for both sides here, so it will not be as cheap as you might expect. You've done well getting someone to sell part of their garden, no matter how small, for as little as £1000.
    • eddddy
    • By eddddy 10th Jun 17, 2:24 PM
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    eddddy
    • #5
    • 10th Jun 17, 2:24 PM
    • #5
    • 10th Jun 17, 2:24 PM
    And presumably, if your neighbour has a mortgage, they've got consent from their lender.

    The mortgage lender will probably want to send out a valuer, which will add more to the costs.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 10th Jun 17, 2:30 PM
    • 40,519 Posts
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    G_M
    • #6
    • 10th Jun 17, 2:30 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Jun 17, 2:30 PM
    I assume you mean
    The land will need its own title, so it's much UNlike any other sale/purchase with the value of the plot being of minor relevance.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Rather than simply transfer a Title, eother

    1) a new Title, with a new Plan, must be created from scratch, or
    2) your existing Title and Plan must be altered to incorporate the new land

    Having said that,I'd expect most of the searches etc could be skipped (subject to a mortgage lender agreeing).

    Does either property have a mortgage? If so consent required, plus the lender will instruct a solicitor to oversee the land transfer - does your quote perhaps include that work?

    Are you paying for your neighbour's legal costs? That is quite usual in cases like this? Does the quote also include that?

    But anyway, as with anything, shop around. Pop into 2 or 3 solicitors' offices, ask to see a conveyancing solicitor, explain the full facts (incl your mortgage situation etc) and get quotes.
    • pinkshoes
    • By pinkshoes 10th Jun 17, 2:44 PM
    • 15,089 Posts
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    pinkshoes
    • #7
    • 10th Jun 17, 2:44 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Jun 17, 2:44 PM
    Assuming you are also paying for their solicitor, this sounds reasonable.

    We looked at purchasing some of our neighbours garden a year ago and had similar quotes to that.
    Should've = Should HAVE (not 'of')
    Would've = Would HAVE (not 'of')

    No, I am not perfect, but yes I do judge people on their use of basic English language. If you didn't know the above, then learn it! (If English is your second language, then you are forgiven!)
    • Indianground
    • By Indianground 10th Jun 17, 4:22 PM
    • 3 Posts
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    Indianground
    • #8
    • 10th Jun 17, 4:22 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Jun 17, 4:22 PM
    I am paying both sides however that quote was just the purchase!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Jun 17, 7:02 PM
    • 22,887 Posts
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    Davesnave
    • #9
    • 10th Jun 17, 7:02 PM
    • #9
    • 10th Jun 17, 7:02 PM
    Hi GM, thanks for the kick up the posterior. I have altered my post.

    Doubly embarrassing as I sold off a part plot about 5 years ago, but of course, they paid all the legal fees. I did draw up a damn good plan though!
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • henry24
    • By henry24 12th Jun 17, 9:53 AM
    • 50 Posts
    • 22 Thanks
    henry24
    How big is the piece you have bought for your £1000?
    • david1951
    • By david1951 12th Jun 17, 10:15 AM
    • 349 Posts
    • 401 Thanks
    david1951
    Your original post implies that you think there is a link between the size/cost of the garden and the amount of work that the solicitor has to do. This is largely incorrect, since the work is pretty much the same whether you are buying 1 sqft. or 50 acres.

    As others have said, shop around.
    • melb
    • By melb 12th Jun 17, 4:36 PM
    • 2,482 Posts
    • 945 Thanks
    melb
    When we purchased part of our neighbour's land, we did the transfer ourselves with help from the Land Registry who provided us with the correct forms. My partner dealt with it but I don't remember him having any difficulties. Mind you neither we nor the vendors had mortgages so maybe that would make a difference?
    The parcel of land did indeed have its own title number and when we contacted the land registry to apply to have it incorporated into our existing title number we were refused!
    • Indianground
    • By Indianground 14th Jun 17, 5:43 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Indianground
    Yes I had researched DIY but unfortunately there is one mortgage involved which I understand complicates things.

    Just to clarify, I was under no illusion about the ratio of cost of the land to the cost of conveyancing, I just thought that £1050 for a purchase alone was quite steep.

    A long time ago I found a thread that talked about conveyancers that specialised in land purchase/selling but I can't find it now - if anyone knows any conveyancers that would be useful.

    In the meantime, I have other quotes coming in and I have managed to get a cheaper quote.

    Thanks for all you help people.
    Last edited by Indianground; 14-06-2017 at 5:46 AM.
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