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    • Epeck
    • By Epeck 9th Jun 17, 5:12 PM
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    Epeck
    Clarification on 'no DSS'
    • #1
    • 9th Jun 17, 5:12 PM
    Clarification on 'no DSS' 9th Jun 17 at 5:12 PM
    Hi,

    I'm looking to move to another rented property closer to family. I work part-time and claim Working and Child tax credits. Does this come under DSS or is it just Housing Benefit that does? I've searched the net for answers but not finding the answer I'm looking for 🙄

    Thanks in advance
Page 2
    • Murphybear
    • By Murphybear 10th Jun 17, 4:51 PM
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    Murphybear
    And what pray tell is a "DSS person?" How are you defining a "DSS person?" You do realise that someone in employment with no children can still be in receipt of benefits.
    Originally posted by Pixie5740
    Have a look at the Institute for Fiscal Studies "a survey of the UK benefit system". It runs to 94 pages

    I think what most of the agencies/Landlords mean is no Housing benefit/LHA. As others have said, so many people are on one type of benefit or another it would be realistic to exclude them all.
    • Murphybear
    • By Murphybear 10th Jun 17, 4:57 PM
    • 3,096 Posts
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    Murphybear
    I would like the answer to the following. Many agencies say the reason that they can't accept housing benefit is that the mortgage companies/insurance companies forbid it. In these uncertain times, anyone can lose their job, especially if they have been employed for less than two years. In that case the tenants will suddenly find themselves on benefits. As long as they pay the rent, they can't be evicted. In fact, there is no reason that the agency/LL would ever know. It makes a mockery of the no benefits rule doesn't it? The only people who have a guaranteed income for life are pensioners
    • Kim kim
    • By Kim kim 10th Jun 17, 4:58 PM
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    Kim kim
    Well considering almost all families I know claim their £20/week child benefit...
    Originally posted by mysterymurdoch
    Ah I wasn't thinking of child benefit, then yes I know lots of people.

    Take away child benefit & pensions, I hardly know anyone.
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 10th Jun 17, 5:10 PM
    • 10,627 Posts
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    Pixie5740
    Ah I wasn't thinking of child benefit, then yes I know lots of people.

    Take away child benefit & pensions, I hardly know anyone.
    Originally posted by Kim kim
    Tax credits?
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 10th Jun 17, 6:10 PM
    • 15,659 Posts
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    FBaby
    Of course someone on benefit can be a great tenant and someone working be the one who end up not paying and cutting all contact but it's about risks.

    A tenant working for at least a couple of years even if made redundant will have statistically more chance to get another job then someone who has been unemployed for 2 years. They are also more likely to hedge savings.

    In the end it's about what can be afforded. If the property is a popular one likely to attract professionals why not pick them over an unemployed tenant?
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 10th Jun 17, 6:32 PM
    • 1,349 Posts
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    parking_question_chap
    And what pray tell is a "DSS person?" How are you defining a "DSS person?" You do realise that someone in employment with no children can still be in receipt of benefits.
    Originally posted by Pixie5740
    Generally speaking a letting agent/landlord would define a DSS person as somebody that relies on benefits of any form to be able to pay their rent bills. The decision to let to them or not would be based on the likelihood they would miss rent payments should any benefits get withdrawn, some say no DSS without exception.

    Depends on personal situation, some DSS would still have means to pay the rent, though generally most would be a high risk, hence many agents/landlords avoid.
    Last edited by parking_question_chap; 10-06-2017 at 6:37 PM.
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 10th Jun 17, 7:16 PM
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    Pixie5740
    Generally speaking a letting agent/landlord would define a DSS person as somebody that relies on benefits of any form to be able to pay their rent bills. The decision to let to them or not would be based on the likelihood they would miss rent payments should any benefits get withdrawn, some say no DSS without exception.

    Depends on personal situation, some DSS would still have means to pay the rent, though generally most would be a high risk, hence many agents/landlords avoid.
    Originally posted by parking_question_chap
    Essentially any person, couple or family who receives any kind of benefit which rules out the majority of adults in the UK then because if they didn't require benefits to help with household expenses they wouldn't get them. In the case of a family you would require one of the parents to earn over £50k per annum to ensure that the family weren't what you would call "DSS."
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 10th Jun 17, 7:21 PM
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    Pixie5740
    Of course someone on benefit can be a great tenant and someone working be the one who end up not paying and cutting all contact but it's about risks.

    A tenant working for at least a couple of years even if made redundant will have statistically more chance to get another job then someone who has been unemployed for 2 years. They are also more likely to hedge savings.

    In the end it's about what can be afforded. If the property is a popular one likely to attract professionals why not pick them over an unemployed tenant?
    Originally posted by FBaby
    Are you defining "DSS" as someone who is not working then rather than someone who receives some sort of benefit? That appears to be different to how parking_question_chap defines "DSS" which just goes to show that it means different things to different people. It's a lazy and outdated way to advertise a property.
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 10th Jun 17, 7:40 PM
    • 1,349 Posts
    • 1,140 Thanks
    parking_question_chap
    Essentially any person, couple or family who receives any kind of benefit which rules out the majority of adults in the UK then because if they didn't require benefits to help with household expenses they wouldn't get them. In the case of a family you would require one of the parents to earn over £50k per annum to ensure that the family weren't what you would call "DSS."
    Originally posted by Pixie5740
    Personally its a judgement call, the decision would be made not just on the benefits claimed but their monthly spending habits as well.
    • Kim kim
    • By Kim kim 10th Jun 17, 8:03 PM
    • 1,985 Posts
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    Kim kim
    Tax credits?
    Originally posted by Pixie5740
    I think of tax credits as a proper benefit - I don't know if anyone I know gets it.
    You have to have quite a low income to get it & most people I know are all working, both people in couples.
    You have to in the SE, to put a roof over your head.
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 10th Jun 17, 9:06 PM
    • 10,627 Posts
    • 14,603 Thanks
    Pixie5740
    I think of tax credits as a proper benefit - I don't know if anyone I know gets it.
    You have to have quite a low income to get it & most people I know are all working, both people in couples.
    You have to in the SE, to put a roof over your head.
    Originally posted by Kim kim
    A household with 2 children and an income of £55k that has child care costs is entitled to child tax credits and if either parent earns less than £50k they get child benefit as well. I know the SE is expensive to live on but not every household will be bringing in over £55k even with two working parents.
    Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.
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