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    • hampshirebabe
    • By hampshirebabe 9th Jun 17, 11:29 AM
    • 580Posts
    • 152Thanks
    hampshirebabe
    Fuschias
    • #1
    • 9th Jun 17, 11:29 AM
    Fuschias 9th Jun 17 at 11:29 AM
    I have a small alleyway to get to my front door, my neighbours front door is also in it, although only a short way down. I've always grown fuschias in the small shady bed on my side, but I like big plants so I dont cut them down each year, and have always had loads of beautiful flowers on them. My neighbour, who was retired when we moved in 17 years ago has gotten older and grumpier, and her garden although I admit is beautiful, is the opposite of mine, small neat plants carefully trimmed weekly.
    She's complained about my fushias, she said they are an eyesore! she keeps telling me I need to prune them back hard to the base and said she would do it except she doesn't have room in her garden waste bag the council collect.
    I dont want us to fall out, but I dont want tiny neat plants. Also they've started flowering now so if they do get trimmed I'm not going to get lots of flowers. I know its late in the pruning season, I've had a busy year so far and not got round to anything much in the garden, I've trimmed them away from the path, although my kids are up and down the path constantly with bikes and scooters so they dont grow out anyway.
    Any suggestions or thoughts?
Page 1
    • Niv
    • By Niv 9th Jun 17, 11:59 AM
    • 1,507 Posts
    • 1,318 Thanks
    Niv
    • #2
    • 9th Jun 17, 11:59 AM
    • #2
    • 9th Jun 17, 11:59 AM
    She has the right to cut the bush back as far as the boundary line and give the bits to you. What you do with the main plant in your garden is your choice, it is not causing a structural issue etc so its simply a battle between you two on what you both like.


    Personally I would volunteer to go into her garden and trim it back to the boundary line as you have stated you do not want to fall out with her. Seems the easiest and a cheap solution.
    YNWA

    Mortgage free by 58.
    • hampshirebabe
    • By hampshirebabe 9th Jun 17, 12:28 PM
    • 580 Posts
    • 152 Thanks
    hampshirebabe
    • #3
    • 9th Jun 17, 12:28 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Jun 17, 12:28 PM
    Its not in her garden, its just along the path, which is all mine on the deeds, she has the right to use it to get to her property, but its all off the path anyway, when its very blowy all bushes blow around, so they might way sway over the path, but you can easily walk past them with bags of shopping or a scooter. She just doesn't like the look of them. She has a a porch roof over her front door, I get wetter from the drips off that than my plants.
    • andymandy
    • By andymandy 9th Jun 17, 2:29 PM
    • 271 Posts
    • 1,011 Thanks
    andymandy
    • #4
    • 9th Jun 17, 2:29 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Jun 17, 2:29 PM
    Politely tell her you will cut them back at the end of the season but not at the moment as they are in flower. Hopefully she will leave them alone. Personally I love Fuschias and would hate anybody to cut mine down when they are in flower.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Jun 17, 7:05 AM
    • 22,932 Posts
    • 88,096 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #5
    • 10th Jun 17, 7:05 AM
    • #5
    • 10th Jun 17, 7:05 AM
    Your neighbour is right, in the sense that many fuchsias benefit from being cut back to grow again from the base, but the less delicate types, like magallenica, have the ability to go on year to year on old wood. Here in Devon, where they form hedges in some places, no one cuts them back far.

    With milder winters, and with some town locations being sheltered, other more highly bred types of fuchsia that would once have been severely cut back by frost, now probably survive to grow on from the old framework.

    But your neighbour has no business pruning your plants, so long as they aren't impeding her right of way, so remind her, nicely of course , if she mentions it again. Some people just need putting back in their box occasionally; interfering is not the exclusive territory of the old
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • mysterymurdoch
    • By mysterymurdoch 10th Jun 17, 7:20 AM
    • 136 Posts
    • 104 Thanks
    mysterymurdoch
    • #6
    • 10th Jun 17, 7:20 AM
    • #6
    • 10th Jun 17, 7:20 AM
    You tell her to mind her own garden, you'll do as you please with yours. Let her know that her clipped plants are no good for wildlife and she should let them grow bigger.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Jun 17, 8:15 AM
    • 22,932 Posts
    • 88,096 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #7
    • 10th Jun 17, 8:15 AM
    • #7
    • 10th Jun 17, 8:15 AM
    Let her know that her clipped plants are no good for wildlife and she should let them grow bigger.
    Originally posted by mysterymurdoch
    Surely that would be as interfering as she is, though?
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • mysterymurdoch
    • By mysterymurdoch 12th Jun 17, 10:07 AM
    • 136 Posts
    • 104 Thanks
    mysterymurdoch
    • #8
    • 12th Jun 17, 10:07 AM
    • #8
    • 12th Jun 17, 10:07 AM
    Surely that would be as interfering as she is, though?
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    It's called "showing her a mirror"... i.e. this is what you're like, now sort yourself out.
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