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  • FIRST POST
    • jenniewb
    • By jenniewb 9th Jun 17, 4:54 AM
    • 12,143Posts
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    jenniewb
    Tooth extraction question
    • #1
    • 9th Jun 17, 4:54 AM
    Tooth extraction question 9th Jun 17 at 4:54 AM
    OK so I've just had my tooth (a molar) extracted (long story following a fracture and several infections)


    I was given a whole load of information following the extraction, but it was a bit of a big deal for me and I didn't take much in beyond "if it keeps bleeding use these swabs"...
    I do know there were no stitches and the wisom tooth behind the removed molar was removed several years ago already.


    I so far have managed to read bits and peices on Google saying don't brush, or brush but avoiding the area, rinse with salt water but only 24 hours after the extraction, take pain killers and to eat a very soft diet-nothing that crunches or has small particles involved (eg rice).


    What I am not so sure on is how long until it's OK to eat foods which need to be chewed again without risking any damage, how long until I can brush the area properly (I normally brush my teeth thoroughly and worry/feel uncomfortable about not being able to brush half my mouth).


    It feels bruised but it's nothing compared to the pain I was in when it had become infected!
Page 1
    • FrancesPuleo
    • By FrancesPuleo 9th Jun 17, 7:20 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    FrancesPuleo
    • #2
    • 9th Jun 17, 7:20 AM
    • #2
    • 9th Jun 17, 7:20 AM
    I have heard about the caldental team that helps in recovery of the tooth. They do provide dental services too. They can help you.
    • Ilona
    • By Ilona 9th Jun 17, 8:20 AM
    • 1,819 Posts
    • 6,361 Thanks
    Ilona
    • #3
    • 9th Jun 17, 8:20 AM
    • #3
    • 9th Jun 17, 8:20 AM
    I have heard about the caldental team that helps in recovery of the tooth. They do provide dental services too. They can help you.
    Originally posted by FrancesPuleo
    New member, post building.

    Jennie, you would be best to ask your dentist, ring them. A dentist on here will probably come along soon and answer your questions. I suggest you don't brush the exact spot where the tooth came out, but you can brush gently the teeth close by, and the rest of your mouth.

    Ilona
    I love skip diving
    • Toothsmith
    • By Toothsmith 9th Jun 17, 11:59 AM
    • 8,679 Posts
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    Toothsmith
    • #4
    • 9th Jun 17, 11:59 AM
    • #4
    • 9th Jun 17, 11:59 AM
    Did they not give you a bit of paper with the instructions written down/printed on as well?
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 9th Jun 17, 1:13 PM
    • 14,477 Posts
    • 14,140 Thanks
    Guest101
    • #5
    • 9th Jun 17, 1:13 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Jun 17, 1:13 PM
    Avoid hot and cold food for upto 3 days, but certainly first 24 hours.


    Chew on other side. Rinse with luke warm water and avoid poking around
    • jenniewb
    • By jenniewb 10th Jun 17, 2:37 AM
    • 12,143 Posts
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    jenniewb
    • #6
    • 10th Jun 17, 2:37 AM
    • #6
    • 10th Jun 17, 2:37 AM
    Did they not give you a bit of paper with the instructions written down/printed on as well?
    Originally posted by Toothsmith


    Yes I got the cotton swabs, but was told I wouldn't need it as it was only if I was bleeding and the bleeding wouldn't stop so I've not used the cotton swabs at all. I've had a few times yesterday been needing to spit blood (sorry that sounds really gross!) but that stopped after 24 hours.


    I was verbally told a lot of stuff, most of which went through me as I wasn't picking much in (I didn't expect to have the tooth extracted and the whole thing took me a bit by suprize).


    I read about rinsing with salt water, not brushing and the cotton swabs but don't remember anything on when I can start brushing all of my mouth or chew on food again without rising a problem.

    I didn't think of calling my dentist- I wish I'd had the time to read the thread before I left this morning! I can't believe I didn't think of that!
    I've noticed already a lot is less painful so I think I'm doing the right thing with the salt washes and so on, but I'm just worried about causing another infection- I'm not on antibiotics and was told to wait to see if there is an infection rather than take anything in precaution. If I split the part the tooth came from I risk it being infected again and this is what caused a lot of the agony in the first place!


    I'm sure my dentist did explain this to me but TBH I wasn't taking much in. I know this is probably the sort of thing that happens regularly in a dental surgery but for me it was a bit stressful and it didn't help that due to the pain I'd not managed more than 2 hours sleep for the three days before the appointment.


    I think it feels a lot more healed already- just don't want to jump the gun and mess the healing process up. I just don't want another infection!
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 10th Jun 17, 6:37 AM
    • 59,136 Posts
    • 345,278 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    • #7
    • 10th Jun 17, 6:37 AM
    • #7
    • 10th Jun 17, 6:37 AM
    I found that my "fear of it opening/bleeding again" and my fear of it becoming infected simply made me be super careful/not brush and eat carefully ... and I was easily lead by the gap's behaviour. In short ... having been "petrified something bad will happen" and not brushing for 1-2 days and rinsing often .... the whole thing had just sealed up and nothing felt odd/wrong and I soon completely forgot it'd ever happened.

    The only problem I had was not being tempted to "poke it with my tongue as it all feels a bit strange there now".

    You should find it just "fixes itself by magic" and one day you'll think "you know I'd completely forgotten about that - it all seems fine now".

    In short: if you just don't brush - and rinse often/well - it'll just slide into your past memory. If you're getting problems, then call the dentist soonest so they can "fix" anything soonest.

    I found: tooth was gone, it was a "novelty" so had to not poke it to see how it felt with my tongue ... and apart from that "nothing else/much happened and it was soon forgotten by me". So eating "normally" will just come naturally to you.

    I will add: I've had 3 removed over the years.
    Last edited by PasturesNew; 10-06-2017 at 6:43 AM.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 10th Jun 17, 4:54 PM
    • 7,872 Posts
    • 4,695 Thanks
    teddysmum
    • #8
    • 10th Jun 17, 4:54 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Jun 17, 4:54 PM
    I had very similar two years ago and while the area was tender (don't remember this being so when my wisdom teeth were taken out as a child ) automatically avoided eating that side, but one day I forgot ( no tenderness to remind me),then carried on as normal.


    I bled very little, though taking daily aspirin and eventually the hole partially filled with gum.
    • jenniewb
    • By jenniewb 11th Jun 17, 3:04 PM
    • 12,143 Posts
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    jenniewb
    • #9
    • 11th Jun 17, 3:04 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Jun 17, 3:04 PM
    Thank you for the help- I've managed to eat something which isn't soup! (I had been living off soup, milky coffee/tea and boiled egg whites which is tricky enough anyway because my body can't seem to tolerate lactose and I have a long history of an eating disorder so cutting back on food is a bit of a risk because it's not so easy to put it back once it's gone).


    I am really relieved I can eat things- not everything I was eating yet, and it feels very odd because two teeth which were next to each other (upper wisdom tooth was taken out a few years ago and upper molar next to it was taken out this time), but I'm hoping I get used to it, it hurts a bit still but doesn't feel anything like the intensity or ...just total PAIN it was for most of the last week/fortnight.


    So to sum up and incase anyone lurking is in a similar position (and perhaps to keep for myself to Google for if it happens again!) it has take just under 3 days to progress beyond lattes and miso soup to things I can chew, but not yet on things that might create dry crumbs (I'll leave that for next week!)


    Thank you again for your replies- I must have looked a bit neurotic and stupid :/ I will say in my defence I hadn't been sleeping properly if at all and I'd not been eating normally either!
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 12th Jun 17, 8:45 AM
    • 35,476 Posts
    • 149,658 Thanks
    silvercar
    Have you tried lactofree milk?
    • Toothsmith
    • By Toothsmith 12th Jun 17, 11:28 AM
    • 8,679 Posts
    • 10,332 Thanks
    Toothsmith
    So to sum up and incase anyone lurking is in a similar position (and perhaps to keep for myself to Google for if it happens again!) it has take just under 3 days to progress beyond lattes and miso soup to things I can chew, but not yet on things that might create dry crumbs (I'll leave that for next week!)
    Originally posted by jenniewb
    Jennie - I would say to anyone in a similar position, listen carefully to the post-extraction advice given by the dentist, and ask for a written-down version of it if you don't feel you'll remember it.

    I haven't jumped in here with the advice I usually give to my patients - because advice can sometimes be specific to specific patients, and I don't know any special circumstances for you - or anyone else who might be reading these pages.

    But not being able to eat normally for several days is not what I tell my patients to usually expect. Most would probably be eating pretty normally the day after.

    As I said - individual circumstances might be different - so the advice given by the dentist at the time is the most important thing to take note of.
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
    • jenniewb
    • By jenniewb 13th Jun 17, 2:08 AM
    • 12,143 Posts
    • 11,484 Thanks
    jenniewb
    Have you tried lactofree milk?
    Originally posted by silvercar
    Yes, if you look on the carton, it explains the milk is not suitable for lactose intolerants which is what I also found to be the case as it didn't stop my symptoms, the issue with dairy intolerance is that the proteins which affect people are not just found in the lactose, this means that you need to avoid not just lactose but dairy as well. It's a long story I found out the hard way through many years of bad digestive issues, but it's safe to say the lacto-free milk didn't work for me. (Soya, almond, oat...etc are all suitable alternatives but I've not found a soup which uses an alternative milk for their soup, hence sticking with miso, consume and so on to avoid the need to chew).


    Thanks though.
    • jenniewb
    • By jenniewb 13th Jun 17, 2:16 AM
    • 12,143 Posts
    • 11,484 Thanks
    jenniewb
    Jennie - I would say to anyone in a similar position, listen carefully to the post-extraction advice given by the dentist, and ask for a written-down version of it if you don't feel you'll remember it.

    I haven't jumped in here with the advice I usually give to my patients - because advice can sometimes be specific to specific patients, and I don't know any special circumstances for you - or anyone else who might be reading these pages.

    But not being able to eat normally for several days is not what I tell my patients to usually expect. Most would probably be eating pretty normally the day after.

    As I said - individual circumstances might be different - so the advice given by the dentist at the time is the most important thing to take note of.
    Originally posted by Toothsmith


    Thanks- I wish I had been able to take notes- fact was I was a bit shakey (as in actually shaking) I'd also not left home for the appointment with a pen or paper and my phone was off. I'd not expected to have the tooth out at all let alone that morning so it was all a bit of a shock and I am still years later affected by the injections enough to put me in a bit of a daze afterwards. It didn't help that the area around the tooth where the injection needed to be was so swollen and infected that it hurt a lot lot more than it usually does to have the injection in the first place.


    I do remember my dentist telling me a lot of stuff and I was trying to note it down mentally, but I don't remember anything beyond the cotton wool swab and I vaguely remember her saying it wouldn't heal for 1-2 weeks and something about 3-4 weeks...it's a huge blur in my mind but I was pretty wary of ending up with another infection so it was important to err on the side of caution; I don't have the strongest immune system at the moment!


    I think I can chew OK now- it's been a few days. I have not tried crunchy things which could get caught anywhere, but things like steamed vegetables, porridge oats, soups with steamed vegetables...etc all seem to be OK. I'm hoping the area will be OK as it seems to be miles better in only a few days which is not what I'd expected given the reading up I'd tried on Google!


    Thank you for your replies- I think I'm OK, still a bit sore and it feels odd enough that I can't use both sides of my mouth atm, but I don't think I'm looking at an infection, it's just healing.
    • LABMAN
    • By LABMAN 13th Jun 17, 2:40 AM
    • 597 Posts
    • 916 Thanks
    LABMAN
    Yes, if you look on the carton, it explains the milk is not suitable for lactose intolerants which is what I also found to be the case as it didn't stop my symptoms, the issue with dairy intolerance is that the proteins which affect people are not just found in the lactose, this means that you need to avoid not just lactose but dairy as well. It's a long story I found out the hard way through many years of bad digestive issues, but it's safe to say the lacto-free milk didn't work for me. (Soya, almond, oat...etc are all suitable alternatives but I've not found a soup which uses an alternative milk for their soup, hence sticking with miso, consume and so on to avoid the need to chew).


    Thanks though.
    Originally posted by jenniewb
    There are no proteins in lactose. It's purely a sugar.
    Je suis Parisien
    • GwylimT
    • By GwylimT 13th Jun 17, 7:13 AM
    • 5,734 Posts
    • 10,675 Thanks
    GwylimT
    There are no proteins in lactose. It's purely a sugar.
    Originally posted by LABMAN
    They mean lactase.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 13th Jun 17, 9:04 AM
    • 35,476 Posts
    • 149,658 Thanks
    silvercar
    Yes, if you look on the carton, it explains the milk is not suitable for lactose dairy ?
    intolerants which is what I also found to be the case as it didn't stop my symptoms, the issue with dairy intolerance is that the proteins which affect people are not just found in the lactose, this means that you need to avoid not just lactose but dairy as well. ....


    Thanks though.
    Originally posted by jenniewb
    Think you are confusing lactose intolerance and dairy intolerance in what you wrote.

    I get your point though. Lactofree milk is great for anyone lactose intolerant but useless for anyone dairy intolerant as its main ingredient is milk.

    Lactase is an enzyme.
    • Pennylane
    • By Pennylane 13th Jun 17, 8:45 PM
    • 1,994 Posts
    • 5,450 Thanks
    Pennylane
    You're not a smoker are you?
    • Geoff1963
    • By Geoff1963 13th Jun 17, 9:52 PM
    • 586 Posts
    • 365 Thanks
    Geoff1963
    Lactase is the enzyme that digests lactose, so lactose intolerance is caused by an inability to produce lactase. Some lacto-free milk, is where the lactase is added.

    Finding what you are intolerant to, can be a voyage of ( often unpleasant ) discovery.
    • jenniewb
    • By jenniewb 16th Jun 17, 3:07 AM
    • 12,143 Posts
    • 11,484 Thanks
    jenniewb
    You're not a smoker are you?
    Originally posted by Pennylane
    Noooo! Very very definitely not! I can't even do passive smoking without feeling like I want to vomit!
    • jenniewb
    • By jenniewb 16th Jun 17, 3:17 AM
    • 12,143 Posts
    • 11,484 Thanks
    jenniewb
    Turns out I have a dry socket now and an infection (literally) the other side of my mouth....I thought I did everything right! Maybe I jumped the gun in terms of chewing things again, I thought I was good to go after 2 days of various types of miso soup, soya based hot drinks and salt water rinses, but I guess I got that wrong :/ Though I think the infection was happening before the tooth came out.

    Not sure if the dry socket is my fault or not, my dentist seems to think they can happen to anyone randomly sometimes.

    Which means I am now unsure if I need to change anything or if there really wasn't anything I could have done- I wasn't even at the point where I was eating things that 'crunched', steamed vegetables and cherry tomatoes were about as "crunchy" as I had gotten.

    Hoping things work out better after the antibiotics. At least I remember what I was told after this appointment!

    Thanks everyone for your help. Sorry for the lactose/lactase dairy confusion, I know what I mean even if I make no sense to anyone else!
    Last edited by jenniewb; 16-06-2017 at 3:20 AM.
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