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  • FIRST POST
    • jscott08
    • By jscott08 8th Jun 17, 12:30 AM
    • 8Posts
    • 2Thanks
    jscott08
    Splitting a room/ window for a partition wall
    • #1
    • 8th Jun 17, 12:30 AM
    Splitting a room/ window for a partition wall 8th Jun 17 at 12:30 AM
    I'm changing the layout of my flat and am looking to add a partition wall. The problem is i need the wall to go down the centre of an existing window so each room has 2 windows (its a bank of 4). The issue with this is that the flat is in a block, and the exterior has to look similar to the other windows for it to be allowed (doesn't have to be identical though). Does anyone know of a way i can split this room with a partition wall and still have the exterior look fairly similar to the other flats windows, i.e one block of 4 windows vs two sets of 2?

    Thanks!
Page 1
    • I have spoken
    • By I have spoken 8th Jun 17, 5:09 AM
    • 4,817 Posts
    • 9,526 Thanks
    I have spoken
    • #2
    • 8th Jun 17, 5:09 AM
    • #2
    • 8th Jun 17, 5:09 AM
    Err, why not place the wall so you split the windows into 2 pairs?
    • casper_g
    • By casper_g 8th Jun 17, 11:29 AM
    • 1,037 Posts
    • 893 Thanks
    casper_g
    • #3
    • 8th Jun 17, 11:29 AM
    • #3
    • 8th Jun 17, 11:29 AM
    Err, why not place the wall so you split the windows into 2 pairs?
    Originally posted by I have spoken
    I wondered the same! But if splitting the four "windows" into two sets of two "windows" means putting a wall "down the centre of an existing window" then perhaps there is actually only one window, with four panes?
    • macman
    • By macman 8th Jun 17, 12:08 PM
    • 40,935 Posts
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    macman
    • #4
    • 8th Jun 17, 12:08 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Jun 17, 12:08 PM
    Do you need the freeholder's permission to do this?
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 8th Jun 17, 12:12 PM
    • 1,243 Posts
    • 1,431 Thanks
    Silvertabby
    • #5
    • 8th Jun 17, 12:12 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Jun 17, 12:12 PM
    “ Err, why not place the wall so you split the windows into 2 pairs?
    Originally posted by I have spoken


    I wondered the same! But if splitting the four "windows" into two sets of two "windows" means putting a wall "down the centre of an existing window" then perhaps there is actually only one window, with four panes? Posted by casper_g
    But that wouldn't change the exterior - only blocking up old/creating new windows would do that. Can the OP clarify?
    • jscott08
    • By jscott08 8th Jun 17, 12:26 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    jscott08
    • #6
    • 8th Jun 17, 12:26 PM
    • #6
    • 8th Jun 17, 12:26 PM
    Sorry don't think i was very clear. I want the window to be to be 2 pairs (2 in each room), however if i did that the normal way then from the outside it looks like two pairs of windows vs a set of 4 like the rest of the flats in the block, which I wouldn't get away with as the flats have to look fairly similar. I can't post pictures unfortunately as im new
    • jscott08
    • By jscott08 8th Jun 17, 12:27 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    jscott08
    • #7
    • 8th Jun 17, 12:27 PM
    • #7
    • 8th Jun 17, 12:27 PM
    I have share of freehold. Have to keep the management company happy though, which means not altering the external appearance too much
    • dickibobboy
    • By dickibobboy 8th Jun 17, 12:57 PM
    • 901 Posts
    • 298 Thanks
    dickibobboy
    • #8
    • 8th Jun 17, 12:57 PM
    • #8
    • 8th Jun 17, 12:57 PM
    I still can't get my head around it. If you have 4 windows from the outside and place a wall in the middle inside how would that change the look from the outside?
    Things that are free in life are great, well most of the time
    • jscott08
    • By jscott08 8th Jun 17, 2:12 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    jscott08
    • #9
    • 8th Jun 17, 2:12 PM
    • #9
    • 8th Jun 17, 2:12 PM
    Ah ok i see how ive confused everyone here, its one window with 4 panes, so i would be splitting it into two windows with two panes. The normal way to do this would require a big space in between the two windows which wouldn't look similar to the other windows in the block. Sorry guys was having a bit of a dim moment there with the explanation!
    • Le_Kirk
    • By Le_Kirk 8th Jun 17, 4:31 PM
    • 1,866 Posts
    • 937 Thanks
    Le_Kirk
    Aha, you are going to remove the existing window and replace with two new windows, each having their own two panes. Don't see how you cannot "change the look from outside" by doing this.
    • jscott08
    • By jscott08 8th Jun 17, 5:33 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    jscott08
    The window doesn't have to be exactly the same as the others but has to be similar
    • greenface
    • By greenface 8th Jun 17, 9:53 PM
    • 4,548 Posts
    • 2,312 Thanks
    greenface
    you can use wider outerframe and by locking two frames together it will give you 100mm before you get to the glazing bead 3x2 stud wall with 12mm plasterboard fills that up . Pinch a bit more with some clip on down the middle . Other frames in the block will only have a 60mm mullion and yours from the outside would measure 140mm in the middle . you can chamfer the last foot down to fit in a smaller profile you could put a studded wall up to the wall and fill the reveal with something thinner like white or coloured glass to make the partition work
    North Wales Holiday Home Owner
    • GDB2222
    • By GDB2222 9th Jun 17, 8:33 AM
    • 13,838 Posts
    • 74,055 Thanks
    GDB2222
    Why not just bring the partition wall to the middle of the existing window? Plenty of people do that. To avoid it looking awful from outside, as Greenface says, just use a thinner material for the last bit of the wall in the window reveal.
    No reliance should be placed on the above! Absolutely none, do you hear?
    • jscott08
    • By jscott08 9th Jun 17, 2:06 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    jscott08
    Yeah that would be ideal, however not sure exactly how to do this as ive not seen it before. Does anyone have any pics of what this could look like (on the inside)?
    • jscott08
    • By jscott08 13th Jun 17, 10:08 AM
    • 8 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    jscott08
    Anyone have any idea of what the above could look like?
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 13th Jun 17, 12:23 PM
    • 3,614 Posts
    • 7,213 Thanks
    DaftyDuck
    What you can do, and looks very good if well done, is install a window into the end of the partition wall you are building, to conjoin to the external window at right angles. That removes the problem of wall thickness onto the external window, and it also maximises light into the two rooms. The internal window needn't be large, but it's generally better if it matches in size the half of the window it's replacing. If one of the rooms is private (loo, bedroom), you can use mirrored or obscured glass.

    I've seen this in some very posh flats on the waterfront in a nearby town. In this case, it was designed in, so both rooms maximised the view, and because it was designed in, it looked perfect. Retrofitting it might not achieve the desired result, particularly if there's no view.

    There's also the possibility of turning each of the window edges into window seats (as those flats did), but I doubt that would work unless you spent a small fortune.
    • jscott08
    • By jscott08 13th Jun 17, 4:00 PM
    • 8 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    jscott08
    What you can do, and looks very good if well done, is install a window into the end of the partition wall you are building, to conjoin to the external window at right angles. That removes the problem of wall thickness onto the external window, and it also maximises light into the two rooms. The internal window needn't be large, but it's generally better if it matches in size the half of the window it's replacing. If one of the rooms is private (loo, bedroom), you can use mirrored or obscured glass.

    I've seen this in some very posh flats on the waterfront in a nearby town. In this case, it was designed in, so both rooms maximised the view, and because it was designed in, it looked perfect. Retrofitting it might not achieve the desired result, particularly if there's no view.

    There's also the possibility of turning each of the window edges into window seats (as those flats did), but I doubt that would work unless you spent a small fortune.
    Originally posted by DaftyDuck
    I had actually thought about putting a window at the end of the partition wall, i've just never seen it done so havent had anything to work from. Dyou by any chance have any pictures of what it needs to look like?
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