Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • colinw
    • By colinw 21st May 17, 1:45 PM
    • 49,868Posts
    • 136,406Thanks
    colinw
    A-Z of Poets
    • #1
    • 21st May 17, 1:45 PM
    A-Z of Poets 21st May 17 at 1:45 PM
    Here is a one you gamesters will love

    Aristotle
    Last edited by colinw; 03-06-2017 at 2:43 PM.
Page 9
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 15th Jun 17, 8:21 AM
    • 28,807 Posts
    • 105,346 Thanks
    Pyxis
    Catullus

    Gaius Valerius Catullus c. 84 – 54 BC) was a Latin poet of the late Roman Republic who wrote in the neoteric style of poetry, which is about personal life rather than classical heroes

    Who says Latin is boring? I did Catullus at school, but never saw a poem like this!
    He wrote a poem, (no.16) that was so filthy, it wasn't translated into English until the 20th century.

    This isn't that one!
    (This is no. 32)


    I beg you, my sweet, my Ipsitilla,
    My darling, my sophisticated beauty,
    Summon me to a midday assignation;
    And, if you're willing, do me one big favor:
    Don't let another client shoot the door bolt,
    And don't decide to suddenly go cruising,
    But stay at home & get yourself all ready
    For nine - yes, nine - successive copulations!
    Honestly, if you want it, give the order:
    I've eaten, and I'm sated, supinated!
    My p***k is poking through my cloak and tunic.
    Last edited by Pyxis; 15-06-2017 at 8:24 AM.
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, P.P..
    ¥ ¥ ¥
    X ~O
    • Chris25
    • By Chris25 15th Jun 17, 8:26 AM
    • 12,493 Posts
    • 12,041 Thanks
    Chris25
    Catullus


    I beg you, my sweet, my Ipsitilla,
    My darling, my sophisticated beauty,
    Summon me to a midday assignation;
    And, if you're willing, do me one big favor:
    Don't let another client shoot the door bolt,
    And don't decide to suddenly go cruising,
    But stay at home & get yourself all ready
    For nine - yes, nine - successive copulations!
    Honestly, if you want it, give the order:
    I've eaten, and I'm sated, supinated!
    My p***k is poking through my cloak and tunic.
    Originally posted by Pyxis
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 15th Jun 17, 8:50 AM
    • 22,277 Posts
    • 57,119 Thanks
    pollypenny
    Catullus

    Gaius Valerius Catullus c. 84 – 54 BC) was a Latin poet of the late Roman Republic who wrote in the neoteric style of poetry, which is about personal life rather than classical heroes

    Who says Latin is boring? I did Catullus at school, but never saw a poem like this!
    He wrote a poem, (no.16) that was so filthy, it wasn't translated into English until the 20th century.

    This isn't that one!
    (This is no. 32)


    I beg you, my sweet, my Ipsitilla,
    My darling, my sophisticated beauty,
    Summon me to a midday assignation;
    And, if you're willing, do me one big favor:
    Don't let another client shoot the door bolt,
    And don't decide to suddenly go cruising,
    But stay at home & get yourself all ready
    For nine - yes, nine - successive copulations!
    Honestly, if you want it, give the order:
    I've eaten, and I'm sated, supinated!
    My p***k is poking through my cloak and tunic.
    Originally posted by Pyxis


    Wow! We didn't do anything like that with Miss Miles!

    In our sweet girls' grammar school our introduction to Latin was not amo', but 'porto'.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 15th Jun 17, 9:03 AM
    • 22,277 Posts
    • 57,119 Thanks
    pollypenny
    Michael Drayton 1563-1630

    I've always like this one.

    Sonnet Lxi
    Since there's no help, come, let us kiss and part,
    Nay, I have done, you get no more of me,
    And I am glad, yea, glad with all my heart,
    That thus so cleanly I myself can free.
    Shake hands for ever, cancel all our vows,
    And when we meet at any time again
    Be it not seen in either of our brows
    That we one jot of former love retain.
    Now at the last gasp of Love's latest breath,
    When, his pulse failing, Passion speechless lies,
    When Faith is kneeling by his bed of death,
    And Innocence is closing up his eyes,
    Now, if thou wouldst, when all have giv'n him over,
    From death to life thou might'st him yet recover.

    Michael Drayton :
    Last edited by pollypenny; 15-06-2017 at 9:06 AM. Reason: Managed to copy the wrong one!
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 15th Jun 17, 1:53 PM
    • 28,807 Posts
    • 105,346 Thanks
    Pyxis
    Originally posted by Chris25
    Wow! We didn't do anything like that with Miss Miles!
    In our sweet girls' grammar school our introduction to Latin was not amo', but 'porto'.
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    you're telling me! We only got the heavily censored stuff!

    You want to read no. 16! That'll blow the top of your head off!
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, P.P..
    ¥ ¥ ¥
    X ~O
    • colinw
    • By colinw 15th Jun 17, 2:16 PM
    • 49,868 Posts
    • 136,406 Thanks
    colinw
    This thread has taken an unexpected turn
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 15th Jun 17, 3:31 PM
    • 28,807 Posts
    • 105,346 Thanks
    Pyxis
    This thread has taken an unexpected turn
    Originally posted by colinw
    I bet you wish you did Latin at school now, didn't you?

    Well, it's never too late!
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, P.P..
    ¥ ¥ ¥
    X ~O
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 15th Jun 17, 3:36 PM
    • 28,807 Posts
    • 105,346 Thanks
    Pyxis
    Max ERNST , (1891–1976), German painter, sculptor, graphic artist, and poet; a pioneer of the Dada movement and Surrealism

    Woman, Old Man and Flowers II

    Which is she and which is he
    And where are the flowers?
    Somewhere between archaic ceremony
    And robotics. No feet no chest.
    Arms stretched toward a sea
    That rides its bloody crest of waves
    And mattress foam under a metal
    Sky, metaphor of the future
    Of a continent with so many wars
    Behind/before it.
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, P.P..
    ¥ ¥ ¥
    X ~O
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 30th Jun 17, 11:54 AM
    • 28,807 Posts
    • 105,346 Thanks
    Pyxis
    BUMP!



    Veronica Forrest-Thomson (1947–1975), Scots poet and critical theorist.


    PASTORAL

    They are our creatures, clover, and they love us
    Through the long summer meadows’ diesel fumes.
    Smooth as their scent and contours clear however
    Less than enough to compensate for names.

    Jagged are names and not our creatures
    Either in kind or movement like the flowers.
    Raised voices in a car or by a river
    Remind us of the world that is not ours.

    Silence in grass and solace in blank verdure
    Summon the frightful glare of nouns and nerves.
    The gentle foal linguistically wounded
    Squeals like a car’s brakes
    Like our twisted words.
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, P.P..
    ¥ ¥ ¥
    X ~O
    • avogadro
    • By avogadro 30th Jun 17, 6:19 PM
    • 3,318 Posts
    • 5,663 Thanks
    avogadro
    Alasdair Gray


    Awaiting

    He was, and educated, and became,
    residing and remaining and intending,
    then on became in, and again,
    and later and later again.
    He still is, and hopes, and intends,
    and may
    but is certain to –
    one day.
    • colinw
    • By colinw 3rd Jul 17, 6:18 PM
    • 49,868 Posts
    • 136,406 Thanks
    colinw
    A Winter Light by John Haines

    We still go about our lives
    in shadow, pouring the white cup full
    with a hand half in darkness.

    Paring potatoes, our heads
    vent over a dream—
    glazed window through which
    the long, yellow sundown looks.

    By candle or firelight
    your face still holds
    a mystery that once
    filled caves with the color
    of unforgettable beasts.
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 3rd Jul 17, 7:55 PM
    • 28,807 Posts
    • 105,346 Thanks
    Pyxis
    IBYCUS, ANCIENT Greek poet, c. 564 BC



    THE INFLUENCE OF SPRING
    .

    Translated by H. N. Coleridge

    IN Spring, bedewed with river-streams,
    From where, for everlasting, gleams
    The garden of th’ Hesperides
    Blossom Cydonian apple-trees; —
    In Spring the saplings freshly shine,
    Beneath the parent-vine
    In shadow and in breeze;
    But me Love’s mighty power,
    That sleepeth never an hour,
    From Venus rushing, burneth with desire,
    As with lightning fire;
    Black, as the Thracian wind,
    He seizes on my mind,
    With dry delirious heat
    Inflames my reason’s seat,
    And, in the centre of my soul,
    Keeps empire for a child, and holds
    Uncheck’d control.
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, P.P..
    ¥ ¥ ¥
    X ~O
    • colinw
    • By colinw 3rd Jul 17, 8:25 PM
    • 49,868 Posts
    • 136,406 Thanks
    colinw
    The Death Of The Ball Turret Gunner - Poem by Randall Jarrell

    From my mother's sleep I fell into the State,
    And I hunched in its belly till my wet fur froze.
    Six miles from earth, loosed from its dream of life,
    I woke to black flak and the nightmare fighters.
    When I died they washed me out of the turret with a hose.
    • colinw
    • By colinw 6th Jul 17, 5:58 PM
    • 49,868 Posts
    • 136,406 Thanks
    colinw
    To A Cat - Poem by John Keats

    Cat! who has pass'd thy grand climacteric,
    How many mice and rats hast in thy days
    Destroy'd? How many tit-bits stolen? Gaze
    With those bright languid segments green, and
    !!!!!
    Those velvet ears - but prythee do not stick
    Thy latent talons in me - and tell me all thy frays,
    Of fish and mice, and rats and tender chick;
    Nay, look not down, nor lick thy dainty wrists, -
    For all the wheezy asthma - and for all
    Thy tail's tip is nick'd off - and though the fists
    Of many a maid have given thee many a maul,
    Still is thy fur as when the lists
    In youth thou enter'dst on glass-bottled wall.
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 6th Jul 17, 6:09 PM
    • 28,807 Posts
    • 105,346 Thanks
    Pyxis
    Philip Larkin (1922–1985)



    This Be The Verse

    They f**k you up, your mum and dad.
    They may not mean to, but they do.
    They fill you with the faults they had
    And add some extra, just for you.

    But they were f**ked up in their turn
    By fools in old-style hats and coats,
    Who half the time were soppy-stern
    And half at one another’s throats.

    Man hands on misery to man.
    It deepens like a coastal shelf.
    Get out as early as you can,
    And don’t have any kids yourself.
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, P.P..
    ¥ ¥ ¥
    X ~O
    • avogadro
    • By avogadro 6th Jul 17, 7:01 PM
    • 3,318 Posts
    • 5,663 Thanks
    avogadro
    Ian McMillan (the bard of Barnsley)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhYlD1I7DMc
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 7th Jul 17, 6:25 PM
    • 22,277 Posts
    • 57,119 Thanks
    pollypenny
    Ogden Nash

    A Word to husbands.

    To keep your marriage happy
    With love in the loving cup,
    Whenever you're wrong admit it,
    Whenever you're right, shut up.
    Last edited by pollypenny; 08-07-2017 at 8:22 AM.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • colinw
    • By colinw 8th Jul 17, 12:12 PM
    • 49,868 Posts
    • 136,406 Thanks
    colinw
    Dulce Et Decorum Est - Poem by Wilfred Owen

    Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
    Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
    Till on the haunting flares we turned out backs,
    And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
    Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots,
    But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame, all blind;
    Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
    Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.

    Gas! GAS! Quick, boys! - An ecstasy of fumbling
    Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time,
    But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
    And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime.-
    Dim through the misty panes and thick green light,
    As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

    In all my dreams before my helpless sight
    He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

    If in some smothering dreams, you too could pace
    Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
    And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
    His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin,
    If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
    Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs
    Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
    Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,-
    My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
    To children ardent for some desperate glory,
    The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
    Pro patria mori.
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 8th Jul 17, 12:19 PM
    • 28,807 Posts
    • 105,346 Thanks
    Pyxis
    Alexander Pope 1688-1744 Eminent English poet.

    From "Couplets on Wit"

    V:
    Now wits gain praise by copying other wits
    As one Hog lives on what another sh---.
    Last edited by Pyxis; 08-07-2017 at 12:22 PM.
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, P.P..
    ¥ ¥ ¥
    X ~O
    • colinw
    • By colinw 8th Jul 17, 1:36 PM
    • 49,868 Posts
    • 136,406 Thanks
    colinw
    Alexander Pope 1688-1744 Eminent English poet.

    From "Couplets on Wit"

    V:
    Now wits gain praise by copying other wits
    As one Hog lives on what another sh---.
    Originally posted by Pyxis
    Ha ha love that one!
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

112Posts Today

1,953Users online

Martin's Twitter