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  • FIRST POST
    • Peter Lanky
    • By Peter Lanky 19th May 17, 7:04 PM
    • 319Posts
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    Peter Lanky
    Induction hob power
    • #1
    • 19th May 17, 7:04 PM
    Induction hob power 19th May 17 at 7:04 PM
    I am in the market for an induction hob, and it seems that the power rating of hobs is either 3kW (13a) or 7.4kW (32a), or something very close to these, and nothing in between.

    When I search online for (say) a Neff hob, to me the two types look very much alike, have similar size and weight, very different prices, and similar features when reading the simplified features shown on most retailers sites. If I try to delve deeper, then I get into the realms of detail that only a trained electrician would understand. Neither version is much use to me.

    So am I getting something considerably better with a 7.4kW model, or am I just purchasing overkill? Do I need what the high power model offers, even when I find out what it actually is. I'm more than happy to buy a 3kW version, but before doing so I just want to know if I'm missing something that I would regret later. Real experiences of both types would help.
    What is happening to the English Language? These are not isolated, but repeated every day.
    'Definate', 'Aswell', 'Rediculous', 'Payed'...and the best of all 'Could Of'. How can anyone think that 'Could Of' can actually mean anything. You may as well write 'Could Zebra' for all the sense it makes.
Page 1
    • Lorian
    • By Lorian 19th May 17, 7:08 PM
    • 4,044 Posts
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    Lorian
    • #2
    • 19th May 17, 7:08 PM
    • #2
    • 19th May 17, 7:08 PM
    You need to consider what wiring you have to your cooker spur, and what size MCB it runs from.
    • AndyMc.....
    • By AndyMc..... 19th May 17, 7:20 PM
    • 731 Posts
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    AndyMc.....
    • #3
    • 19th May 17, 7:20 PM
    • #3
    • 19th May 17, 7:20 PM
    You're going to need something like a 10mm cable so where is the hob in relation to the consumer unit.
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 19th May 17, 9:25 PM
    • 7,464 Posts
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    Owain Moneysaver
    • #4
    • 19th May 17, 9:25 PM
    • #4
    • 19th May 17, 9:25 PM
    I assume you're talking about a 4-"ring" hob.

    3 kW would usually be sufficient for 2 ordinary electric radiant rings on full power simultaneously.

    A 7 kW hob will be able to run all 4 "rings" on full power simultaneously. A 3 kW will spread the available power round the "rings".

    If you do a mixture of simmering on the hob then 3 kW is probably adequate for 4 rings as they won't be on full power anyway. If you wanted to have 4 frying pans on max at the same time you'll find a 3 kW underpowered compared to a standard 7 kW hob.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • thescouselander
    • By thescouselander 19th May 17, 9:32 PM
    • 5,215 Posts
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    thescouselander
    • #5
    • 19th May 17, 9:32 PM
    • #5
    • 19th May 17, 9:32 PM
    Personally I'd go for the full 7 KW - 3KW is going to be a compromise and assuming you're wiring into a standard cooker circuit the higher power hob should be fine.
    • economic
    • By economic 20th May 17, 12:11 AM
    • 1,738 Posts
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    economic
    • #6
    • 20th May 17, 12:11 AM
    • #6
    • 20th May 17, 12:11 AM
    Personally I would go for gas if you can. Much better saleability and for renting. And no need to worry about power. You can use all four rings at same time at full power!
    • Peter Lanky
    • By Peter Lanky 20th May 17, 5:57 AM
    • 319 Posts
    • 130 Thanks
    Peter Lanky
    • #7
    • 20th May 17, 5:57 AM
    • #7
    • 20th May 17, 5:57 AM
    If a 7.4kW unit requires physical disruption to the house, then it's a non starter. I am having an electrician in to look at my existing wiring next week, as I don't have enough knowledge to draw my own conclusions. At the moment my cooker circuit has a 32 amp breaker, but that's not to say the existing wiring is not capable of higher, but the electrician will tell me that.

    I'm more interested in whether I really need a 7.4kW unit if my present circuit will accept it, especially with the generally higher price. In these days of more efficiency, it seems odd that I need to consider something requiring double the power of something that has served satisfactorily for 23 years. It is extremely unlikely that I would want more than 2 rings on full power at any given time.

    I have no intention of selling or renting, nor running a gas supply to a room that doesn't already have one.
    What is happening to the English Language? These are not isolated, but repeated every day.
    'Definate', 'Aswell', 'Rediculous', 'Payed'...and the best of all 'Could Of'. How can anyone think that 'Could Of' can actually mean anything. You may as well write 'Could Zebra' for all the sense it makes.
    • theonlywayisup
    • By theonlywayisup 20th May 17, 7:17 AM
    • 10,893 Posts
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    theonlywayisup
    • #8
    • 20th May 17, 7:17 AM
    • #8
    • 20th May 17, 7:17 AM
    If your electrics can take the more powerful one, do it.

    We went to a Miele demo some years ago when we were looking for our induction hob. The lesser powered models (they used a Siemens) wouldn't allow the P setting (super heat) on more than one ring and even wouldn't allow 2 rings to be on higher than a 5 at the same time.

    As Owain Moneysaver says above, it is how you use it.

    We don't use every ring on P but, there are occasions when I want to quick boil water in two pans simultaneously and if I'd bought the less powerful hob I wouldn't be able to do it.

    Another point to note, when you come to replace your pans you will need to understand there isn't an 'industry standard' with hob circuitry and some smaller pans won't work on all hobs.
    http://www.stellarcookware.co.uk/Support/Induction-FAQ.html Go for all stainless rather than coloured/coated pans and use the smallest ring on your hob that you can get away with. If the ring is too big it won't induct the pan.

    Whatever you decide, induction will be the best thing you've done in your kitchen!
    • thescouselander
    • By thescouselander 20th May 17, 7:56 AM
    • 5,215 Posts
    • 4,716 Thanks
    thescouselander
    • #9
    • 20th May 17, 7:56 AM
    • #9
    • 20th May 17, 7:56 AM
    If a 7.4kW unit requires physical disruption to the house, then it's a non starter. I am having an electrician in to look at my existing wiring next week, as I don't have enough knowledge to draw my own conclusions. At the moment my cooker circuit has a 32 amp breaker, but that's not to say the existing wiring is not capable of higher, but the electrician will tell me that.

    I'm more interested in whether I really need a 7.4kW unit if my present circuit will accept it, especially with the generally higher price. In these days of more efficiency, it seems odd that I need to consider something requiring double the power of something that has served satisfactorily for 23 years. It is extremely unlikely that I would want more than 2 rings on full power at any given time.

    I have no intention of selling or renting, nor running a gas supply to a room that doesn't already have one.
    Originally posted by Peter Lanky

    Only you can determine what your requirements are. I'd say this though - 4 ring hobs have been around 6kw when you add up the ratings of all the rings for donkeys years.

    Also think about the peak load situation - will you be cooking Christmas dinner or some other large meal that will require use of all 4 hobs? In a situation like that you might find a 3 KW hob is slower to get the cooking going.
    • ryder72
    • By ryder72 20th May 17, 8:01 AM
    • 972 Posts
    • 607 Thanks
    ryder72
    Here are some facts that may help you make a decision.

    The ideal hob to get is the 7.2kW one for which you will need a 30A/6mm cable run from the board.

    BSH do 2 other models-
    A 13A one which is designed for the replacement market for those moving up from ceramic hobs. The circuitry is designed to cap power draw at 3kW but if you add up the individual rings they are more than 3kW. This means you will be able to run any 2 rings at full power but 3 or more at reduced power. If you do a large bulk of your cooking on 2 rings at any one time, then there is no problem buying this one.

    A 20A one which is a halfway house. This is designed where only 1 30A feed is available and there is a need to run a hob and an oven off it. As long as you have overload protection you can run a 20A (or even 30A) hob and a 16A oven off this. In the event that the maximum draw exceeds 30A, the circuit will trip and will need resetting. The likelihood of this happening as very remote as you have to have all your appliances at peak power draw at the same moment in time. This is allowed using a principle called diversity. PLease consult a qualified electrician before you go down this route though.
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    • Jonesya
    • By Jonesya 20th May 17, 8:47 AM
    • 1,300 Posts
    • 804 Thanks
    Jonesya
    If you've got a gas supply, then strongly consider a gas hob.

    - As controllable than induction.
    - Massively lower running costs - gas @ 3-4p/kWh, electricity @ 10-13p/kWh.
    - Very simple, no complex electronics and power controllers to go wrong.
    • thescouselander
    • By thescouselander 20th May 17, 9:06 AM
    • 5,215 Posts
    • 4,716 Thanks
    thescouselander
    Here are some facts that may help you make a decision.

    The ideal hob to get is the 7.2kW one for which you will need a 30A/6mm cable run from the board.

    BSH do 2 other models-
    A 13A one which is designed for the replacement market for those moving up from ceramic hobs. The circuitry is designed to cap power draw at 3kW but if you add up the individual rings they are more than 3kW. This means you will be able to run any 2 rings at full power but 3 or more at reduced power. If you do a large bulk of your cooking on 2 rings at any one time, then there is no problem buying this one.
    Originally posted by ryder72

    Actually ceramic hobs usually require a 30A feed. AFAIK 13A induction hobs are for people changing from gas and who don't have a cooker circuit and don't want the hassle of electrical work. The 13A rating allows them to run the hob off the ring main. Its all a bit of a bodge if you ask me.
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 20th May 17, 9:08 AM
    • 3,104 Posts
    • 3,832 Thanks
    bouicca21
    Very interesting and informative thread as I am also thinking of getting an induction hob. And for those recommending gas - I do have a gas hob but it seems to be a characteristic of modern gas hobs that they are nowhere near as controllable as they used to be. For controllable, induction is the way to go.

    OP who are you going to get to come and look at whether an installation is viable or not? An independent electrician or someone from the shop selling the hob? Like you I don't want to buy one and then find I've bought the wrong thing.
    • Annie1960
    • By Annie1960 20th May 17, 10:02 AM
    • 2,669 Posts
    • 1,492 Thanks
    Annie1960
    Hi Peter

    I have just gone through exactly the same questioning process as you. I rang NEFF who explained, as others have above, that it depends on whether you want to have all the rings on at once, on full power.

    Also the prices vary wildly. The model I'm looking as is this one, 6.9 kW:

    https://www.johnlewis.com/neff-t46fd53x0-induction-hob-black-glass/p3196211

    The same one is also available here for £150 less:

    http://www.appliancesdirect.co.uk/p/t46fd53x0/neff-t46fd53x0-appliances-4-induction-hob-hob#/specs
    • shaun from Africa
    • By shaun from Africa 20th May 17, 10:11 AM
    • 9,445 Posts
    • 10,613 Thanks
    shaun from Africa
    The way I would look at it is this.
    If you can afford the extra £150 or so for the higher power hob (and providing that your electrics are suitable), then I would say get the more expensive one.
    You may not need the extra power now but who knows about the future and it's probably better to have the power available and not need it rather than need it and then wish you had spent the extra money.
    • Paradigm
    • By Paradigm 20th May 17, 11:57 AM
    • 3,388 Posts
    • 4,292 Thanks
    Paradigm
    I have a 3kw induction hob for exactly the reason stated above, I switched from gas & didn't have suitable wiring to have anything more powerful...just a 13amp socket.


    Yes it limits how many rings you can have on full power but in all honesty it isn't any hardship at all, I can't remember the last time I needed all four rings on full power even when I had a gas hob.


    Having said that, if you do have or are prepared to have suitable wiring then getting the more powerful model is the way to go... what will do a lot will also do a little.
    Always try to be at least half the person your dog thinks you are!
    • MisterP123
    • By MisterP123 20th May 17, 12:03 PM
    • 159 Posts
    • 178 Thanks
    MisterP123
    If you've got a gas supply, then strongly consider a gas hob.

    - As controllable than induction.
    - Massively lower running costs - gas @ 3-4p/kWh, electricity @ 10-13p/kWh.
    - Very simple, no complex electronics and power controllers to go wrong.
    Originally posted by Jonesya
    How much of that gas gets wasted heating the air, the sides of the pan, you as you're cooking. Etc etc.
    • Peter Lanky
    • By Peter Lanky 20th May 17, 12:07 PM
    • 319 Posts
    • 130 Thanks
    Peter Lanky
    Very interesting and informative thread as I am also thinking of getting an induction hob. And for those recommending gas - I do have a gas hob but it seems to be a characteristic of modern gas hobs that they are nowhere near as controllable as they used to be. For controllable, induction is the way to go.

    OP who are you going to get to come and look at whether an installation is viable or not? An independent electrician or someone from the shop selling the hob? Like you I don't want to buy one and then find I've bought the wrong thing.
    Originally posted by bouicca21
    I am getting an electrician round who's a sort of friend (via a local Facebook group) who has done a few jobs for me, my family and friend for 3 or 4 years now, so what he tells me will be the absolute truth.

    To be honest, I'd never considered my old hob to be anything but 13 amp, but now I'm going to have to take a look, which means having to remove the oven to look underneath, as my c1994 instruction manual is too generic. But it is raining, so nothing else to do this afternoon..

    From another post, I've never seen a 20 amp hob, but that would be ideal as my oven is rated as 2500W so will only be 10 amp. A little research topic for this afternoon
    What is happening to the English Language? These are not isolated, but repeated every day.
    'Definate', 'Aswell', 'Rediculous', 'Payed'...and the best of all 'Could Of'. How can anyone think that 'Could Of' can actually mean anything. You may as well write 'Could Zebra' for all the sense it makes.
    • Annie1960
    • By Annie1960 20th May 17, 12:25 PM
    • 2,669 Posts
    • 1,492 Thanks
    Annie1960
    This one is 20 amps.

    http://www.appliancesdirect.co.uk/p/t36fb41x0g/neff-t36fb41x0g-appliances-4-induction-hob-hob

    The person I spoke to at Neff was very helpful, so you could give them a ring before you make your final choice.
    • southcoastrgi
    • By southcoastrgi 20th May 17, 12:50 PM
    • 5,204 Posts
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    southcoastrgi
    One other thing to consider is the type of pans you have, not all pans will work on an induction hob so not only will you be buying a new hob you might be replacing your pots & pans as well
    I'm only here while I wait for Corrie to start.

    You get no BS from me & if I think you are wrong I WILL tell you.
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