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  • FIRST POST
    • confusedgraduate
    • By confusedgraduate 19th May 17, 3:28 PM
    • 2Posts
    • 2Thanks
    confusedgraduate
    Psychology Graduate with No Clue.
    • #1
    • 19th May 17, 3:28 PM
    Psychology Graduate with No Clue. 19th May 17 at 3:28 PM
    Hoping someone can enlighten me and throw some ideas my way as I am currently drowning.

    I have completed my 2:1 Honours degree in Psychology, I live in Scotland (will be moving to Fareham this year) and have no idea what to do with my life.
    When I began my degree I, like a lot of my friends, had no idea that further education would be required in order to actually get a job in Psychology. I applied for my PhD in Counselling psychology and was knocked back a few weeks ago and now have been laid off from my job which was never by any means permanent anyway.
    Now I'm sitting here, unemployed, with a degree I don't think I can even use. It's sending me off the rails a bit as I don't have any psychology related experience as I have always worked in customer service and never had the time to find any being a full-time carer for my mum who is a stroke victim.

    So here I am an unemployed carer with a 2:1 Honours degree in Psychology, moving to a new country in a few weeks with no positive outlook and absolutely no idea of what I can or want to do.

    Anyone got any advice? Much appreciated

    Holly.
Page 1
    • jobbingmusician
    • By jobbingmusician 19th May 17, 4:22 PM
    • 18,517 Posts
    • 18,750 Thanks
    jobbingmusician
    • #2
    • 19th May 17, 4:22 PM
    • #2
    • 19th May 17, 4:22 PM
    Training as an IAPT PWP? (CBT is not as popular as it was, but these practitioners seem always to be in demand.) Contacting the National Careers Service?
    I'm the Board Guide on the Matched Betting; Referrers and Jobseeking & Training boards. I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly, and I can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with this). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com.

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    • mariposa687
    • By mariposa687 19th May 17, 4:51 PM
    • 75 Posts
    • 92 Thanks
    mariposa687
    • #3
    • 19th May 17, 4:51 PM
    • #3
    • 19th May 17, 4:51 PM
    Have you heard of Skills Development Scotland? I've been to their drop in centre a few times for long term career advice and general application advice. They are really helpful and it's free.

    I've been in your position, graduate with a languages degree which isn't so useful without a Masters so I know how you feel! I'm doing something completely different now years on. It does get better!
    • gettingtheresometime
    • By gettingtheresometime 19th May 17, 6:24 PM
    • 2,363 Posts
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    gettingtheresometime
    • #4
    • 19th May 17, 6:24 PM
    • #4
    • 19th May 17, 6:24 PM
    Let's start from basics when you chose your degree how did you envisage you'd use it once graduated?
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    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 19th May 17, 7:02 PM
    • 3,584 Posts
    • 3,650 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    • #5
    • 19th May 17, 7:02 PM
    • #5
    • 19th May 17, 7:02 PM
    For many companies the specific degree is of less importance that the fact of having a degree. Attaining that implies a level of ability, although I would question that premise in a number of university graduates I've worked with.
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 19th May 17, 7:18 PM
    • 6,774 Posts
    • 17,954 Thanks
    DigForVictory
    • #6
    • 19th May 17, 7:18 PM
    • #6
    • 19th May 17, 7:18 PM
    Contacting the National Careers Service
    Originally posted by jobbingmusician
    ^^ This. They can trot you through a few (more!) psychometric tests & see what they suggest as possible career paths so you can mentally try them on for size. (Tiring but better to have a clue even if you change tack later.)
    In the very short term, any work as a volunteer will demonstrate teamwork, possibly cash handling, customer facing yadda - and get you out of the house.
    Very best of luck!
    • Loanranger
    • By Loanranger 19th May 17, 7:24 PM
    • 1,925 Posts
    • 4,995 Thanks
    Loanranger
    • #7
    • 19th May 17, 7:24 PM
    • #7
    • 19th May 17, 7:24 PM
    Contact your university's careers service. That is what they are there for. They will help you. You can also contact the local university in the area you are moving to.
    Do these two things without delay.
    Many university careers services will have vacancies reserved for their own grads behind a password protected firewall so get in touch as above.
    Use the website prospects.ac.uk as well.
    • confusedgraduate
    • By confusedgraduate 19th May 17, 8:25 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    confusedgraduate
    • #8
    • 19th May 17, 8:25 PM
    • #8
    • 19th May 17, 8:25 PM
    Thank you all, I feel a bit better just to know I have some options, it's oddly comforting to know that others have been in the same rut.

    I hadn't heard of Skills Development Scotland, I will give them a try. Looking back over the years I feel as though I would have benefited more from going to college and learning a trade but initially I had wanted to help people deal with illnesses such as Cancer and HIV. Counselling psychology was my main aim but as I was knocked back for the PhD I know I'll never go back to university as I'm ready to get on with my life and I just don't want to be a student anymore, it's sickening.

    I know it's good to see someone applying for a job when they have a degree however, I don't even seem to have the experience to get into a decent job. Thanks for all your support and I have a meeting with my university career's adviser booked in for next week.
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 19th May 17, 8:40 PM
    • 6,774 Posts
    • 17,954 Thanks
    DigForVictory
    • #9
    • 19th May 17, 8:40 PM
    • #9
    • 19th May 17, 8:40 PM
    You've done the degree - now the fun bit - mapping it onto "real life".
    Very best of luck!
    • Loanranger
    • By Loanranger 19th May 17, 8:46 PM
    • 1,925 Posts
    • 4,995 Thanks
    Loanranger
    On the prospects website that I mentioned you can read a booklet entitled What Can I do with my Degree in Psychology. The more preparation you do prior to seeing the careers adviser the more use the interview will be.
    • dawyldthing
    • By dawyldthing 19th May 17, 8:58 PM
    • 2,424 Posts
    • 1,389 Thanks
    dawyldthing
    I worked with someone from Australia at a summer camp 10 years ago. She was a couple of years older than me and had done a degree in business something if I remember. Anyway fast forward 10 years we caught up last year and she's now done a degree and masters in psychology and is working as a psychologist. Another friend did a degree in psychology and has been trying for years to get onto mental health nursing degree - she is starting it in September. A lot have left and are doing everyday jobs - myself included - it just depends what you want to do. Don't forget we'll be working in our 70s and I recogn we'll all change career a few times inbetween.
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    • Fireflyaway
    • By Fireflyaway 20th May 17, 8:22 AM
    • 985 Posts
    • 968 Thanks
    Fireflyaway
    A degree of any sort can help progress your career at a faster level in all kinds of fields. What area interests you? Could you explore graduate programs? Everything from retail to business to the police force, airlines etc offer them. Try to find an area that interests you. I fell into customer service after college and found it hard to move away. Good luck.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 20th May 17, 8:51 AM
    • 3,212 Posts
    • 5,233 Thanks
    sangie595
    I would have thought that psychology has allot to do with customer services! Don't assume there isn't a career path in there. But if not, are you any good with children - teaching now has many routes into it, including ones that don't require any further studying (although a one year PGCE may still be the best route) and not only does it not really matter what your first degree is ( within reason) but psychology would be a real benefit for a teacher. Helping people doesn't have to involve counseling, but what better thing to do with your future than helping young people along a positive life path? You help young people to develop resilience and confidence, and they will be able to cope with whatever life throws at them.
    • Pennywise
    • By Pennywise 20th May 17, 9:19 AM
    • 8,903 Posts
    • 16,034 Thanks
    Pennywise
    When I began my degree I, like a lot of my friends, had no idea that further education would be required in order to actually get a job in Psychology.
    Originally posted by confusedgraduate
    That's very worrying that apparently lots of people aren't aware of the reality after leaving university.

    It's the same with many professions. Such as accountancy, architecture, law, etc. Getting a degree in accountancy, doesn't make you an accountant. You then have to get a trainee job in accountancy and undertake a few more years of study and exams to actually become a qualified accountant, the criteria for which is a mix of relevant supervised work experience and passing a range of exams.

    In fact, as someone who has employed graduates with accountancy degrees, I'd have to say that I havn't a clue what they were taught at Uni as they've all had to start at pretty much ground zero when they start work in an accountancy job. In fact, no better than school leavers except for a few exemptions from some of the exams they'll have to take.

    You really do need to take advantage of whatever careers advisory services available to get your life back on track and find the best use of your degree.
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