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  • FIRST POST
    • PhilE
    • By PhilE 19th May 17, 9:31 AM
    • 17Posts
    • 11Thanks
    PhilE
    Asbestos in house; Genuine hazard, or source of paranoia?
    • #1
    • 19th May 17, 9:31 AM
    Asbestos in house; Genuine hazard, or source of paranoia? 19th May 17 at 9:31 AM
    So the survey of the property I purchased recommends that on replacement of the boiler, the asbestos flue should go.

    The heating specialist informs me that the flue may not be able to be removed as it was built into the house at the time of the house construction, but if left alone it should be fine. The casing around the flue is also asbestos. He says he himself cant touch the casing, its up to me if I wish to get it removed, but once again if left alone it's fine.

    Asbestos is a hazard, but I we a bit too paranoid about it nowadays? Is it necessary to ensure that every scrap of asbestos is removed? If he says he can't remove the flue, I'm inclined to just leave it in and get the air tested for asbestos once the job is done...
    Last edited by PhilE; 19-05-2017 at 9:45 AM.
Page 1
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 19th May 17, 9:57 AM
    • 23,188 Posts
    • 65,105 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #2
    • 19th May 17, 9:57 AM
    • #2
    • 19th May 17, 9:57 AM
    If it doesn't contain loose fibres then it is safe, even safest, left in situ. Anything that has the asbestos fibres sealed in so it appears like a concrete or a solid board doesn't pose a risk unless disturbed.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • DumbMuscle
    • By DumbMuscle 19th May 17, 10:00 AM
    • 63 Posts
    • 63 Thanks
    DumbMuscle
    • #3
    • 19th May 17, 10:00 AM
    • #3
    • 19th May 17, 10:00 AM
    Asbestos is only a hazard if disturbed. The solid material will sit there happily not being on fire (which is, of course, what it's there for). The dust formed when it breaks will get into your lungs and do horrible things. It's generally worth removing if it can be done incidentally as part of other building works, if it's deteriorating (which your surveyor would have raised alarm bells at), or if other works would require messing with it, but otherwise best left alone. Just make sure to warn any contractors you have working on the house that it's there
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 19th May 17, 10:49 AM
    • 707 Posts
    • 443 Thanks
    EachPenny
    • #4
    • 19th May 17, 10:49 AM
    • #4
    • 19th May 17, 10:49 AM
    The heating specialist informs me that the flue may not be able to be removed as it was built into the house at the time of the house construction, but if left alone it should be fine. The casing around the flue is also asbestos. He says he himself cant touch the casing, its up to me if I wish to get it removed, but once again if left alone it's fine.
    Originally posted by PhilE
    Can you explain/clarify what you mean by 'casing' ?

    As the other posters have indicated, one kind of 'asbestos' is actually asbestos fibres incorporated into a binder material, often cement. Products like that would be properly called "Asbestos Cement ..." - and covers a whole range of building products including pipes and boards. Asbestos cement pipes were commonly used in heating applications, either as chimney liners, or the pipe connecting the boiler to the chimney. Asbestos cement is normally a dull grey colour, but in some cases may be painted or have a special surface finish.

    If the flue has a 'casing' this might suggest the inclusion of asbestos fibre lagging, which is a different material with a different and higher risk level.

    The HSE website has a lot of useful information about asbestos and how to deal with it. If it is the right kind of asbestos then leaving it in-situ and undisturbed may be the best approach as the previous posters have said.

    But if a professional has told you they 'can't touch' the casing then for peace of mind I would want to be sure exactly what the material you have is and whether it is safe to leave it undisturbed.

    Whatever you do, don't be tempted to try and remove it yourself - as DumbMuscle says, it can do horrible things to you, and to anyone else in the house who gets exposed.

    If you can provide a picture of the 'casing' this might help people to give you some guidance.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • PhilE
    • By PhilE 20th May 17, 12:22 PM
    • 17 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    PhilE
    • #5
    • 20th May 17, 12:22 PM
    • #5
    • 20th May 17, 12:22 PM
    Can you explain/clarify what you mean by 'casing' ?

    As the other posters have indicated, one kind of 'asbestos' is actually asbestos fibres incorporated into a binder material, often cement. Products like that would be properly called "Asbestos Cement ..." - and covers a whole range of building products including pipes and boards. Asbestos cement pipes were commonly used in heating applications, either as chimney liners, or the pipe connecting the boiler to the chimney. Asbestos cement is normally a dull grey colour, but in some cases may be painted or have a special surface finish.

    If the flue has a 'casing' this might suggest the inclusion of asbestos fibre lagging, which is a different material with a different and higher risk level.

    The HSE website has a lot of useful information about asbestos and how to deal with it. If it is the right kind of asbestos then leaving it in-situ and undisturbed may be the best approach as the previous posters have said.

    But if a professional has told you they 'can't touch' the casing then for peace of mind I would want to be sure exactly what the material you have is and whether it is safe to leave it undisturbed.

    Whatever you do, don't be tempted to try and remove it yourself - as DumbMuscle says, it can do horrible things to you, and to anyone else in the house who gets exposed.

    If you can provide a picture of the 'casing' this might help people to give you some guidance.
    Originally posted by EachPenny

    The casing was unfortunately disturbed by the job, the installer said to just put some builders caulk on it. He replaced the section of the casing taken away during the removal of the flue with wood board.

    I'm wondering if he left my home in a safe state, as the asbestos has clearly been disturbed.

    Any advice on how to proceed much appreciated.
    • PhilE
    • By PhilE 20th May 17, 12:42 PM
    • 17 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    PhilE
    • #6
    • 20th May 17, 12:42 PM
    • #6
    • 20th May 17, 12:42 PM
    I'm not allowed by the forum to post photos, as I'm a new user. Moderator if you could amend this, that would be much appreciated.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 20th May 17, 12:59 PM
    • 23,188 Posts
    • 65,105 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #7
    • 20th May 17, 12:59 PM
    • #7
    • 20th May 17, 12:59 PM
    Post a broken link. We will fix.

    You'll be allowed to post links after a certain number, there are no moderators.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • PhilE
    • By PhilE 20th May 17, 5:42 PM
    • 17 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    PhilE
    • #8
    • 20th May 17, 5:42 PM
    • #8
    • 20th May 17, 5:42 PM
    Had an asbestos remover around to give his opinion, this has turned into a bit of a drama. Best to start another thread on it....
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