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  • FIRST POST
    • Mishomeister
    • By Mishomeister 17th May 17, 9:27 PM
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    Mishomeister
    What pressure should my tires have
    • #1
    • 17th May 17, 9:27 PM
    What pressure should my tires have 17th May 17 at 9:27 PM
    Could some one advise me on what tire pressure should I aim for in my tires.
    I have the below picture by my petrol tank but don't know how to convers it to the same units as used in the air pumps at the petrol stations.




    My motor is 1.4. Skoda Fabia Elegance 2006 Automatic
    Last edited by Mishomeister; 17-05-2017 at 9:31 PM.
Page 1
    • Tigsteroonie
    • By Tigsteroonie 17th May 17, 9:33 PM
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    Tigsteroonie
    • #2
    • 17th May 17, 9:33 PM
    • #2
    • 17th May 17, 9:33 PM
    Just a random idea, but have you thought about typing the BAR value into Google and asking for the PSI equivalent? E.g. "2.3bar in psi" in Google search gives me the answer "2.3bar = 33.35psi"

    I often use Google as a handy unit converter
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    • Livelongandprosper
    • By Livelongandprosper 17th May 17, 9:34 PM
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    Livelongandprosper
    • #3
    • 17th May 17, 9:34 PM
    • #3
    • 17th May 17, 9:34 PM
    You need to look at your tyres and see what you have and match the numbers from the tyres to those on the chart
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 17th May 17, 9:43 PM
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    TBagpuss
    • #4
    • 17th May 17, 9:43 PM
    • #4
    • 17th May 17, 9:43 PM
    the first column is which type of tyre you have - the details will be on the tyres.

    Then use the next (lightly loaded) column (unless your car is typically heavily loaded!) and the numbers relate to the front and rear tyres.

    Most machines give you the option of psi (which you don't have on your sticker) or Bar (which you do) so select bar and use those figures

    Or you can use a conversion table like this one to work out the psi numbers.
    https://www.sensorsone.com/tyre-pressure-conversion-table/
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 17th May 17, 11:11 PM
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    Ectophile
    • #5
    • 17th May 17, 11:11 PM
    • #5
    • 17th May 17, 11:11 PM
    Just to clarify, it's showing two figures for each pressure. The first is in kPa (kilopascals), which nobody ever uses. The second is in bars, which should be on most pumps and pressure gauges, unless you have dug out a pump from the dark ages.

    So for instance 230/2.3 is 230kPa or 2.3bar. Which Google says is 33.3 PSI if you do have a pump from the dark ages.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • katemore
    • By katemore 20th May 17, 4:55 PM
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    katemore
    • #6
    • 20th May 17, 4:55 PM
    • #6
    • 20th May 17, 4:55 PM
    Check the tyres on the car then select the pressure that corresponds to the tyre. Google search can be misleading because some owners have different tyre sizes. If you drive mostly alone choose the pressure set on the left, if your car is fully loaded choose the right side one.
    • bigadaj
    • By bigadaj 20th May 17, 9:29 PM
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    bigadaj
    • #7
    • 20th May 17, 9:29 PM
    • #7
    • 20th May 17, 9:29 PM
    Just to clarify, it's showing two figures for each pressure. The first is in kPa (kilopascals), which nobody ever uses. The second is in bars, which should be on most pumps and pressure gauges, unless you have dug out a pump from the dark ages.

    So for instance 230/2.3 is 230kPa or 2.3bar. Which Google says is 33.3 PSI if you do have a pump from the dark ages.
    Originally posted by Ectophile
    Well I certainly use kPa in my engineering calculations, lot easier than pounds force per square foot.

    And in a happy coincidence, much like the near equivalence between ton and tonne, then 1 bar is pretty much 100kPa.
    • Mishomeister
    • By Mishomeister 22nd May 17, 8:51 PM
    • 713 Posts
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    Mishomeister
    • #8
    • 22nd May 17, 8:51 PM
    • #8
    • 22nd May 17, 8:51 PM
    [/IMG]
    This is what is written on the tyre. It looks lik it indicated the pressure required that is higher than on the chart above.
    Is this correct?
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 22nd May 17, 9:04 PM
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    AdrianC
    • #9
    • 22nd May 17, 9:04 PM
    • #9
    • 22nd May 17, 9:04 PM
    [/IMG]
    This is what is written on the tyre. It looks lik it indicated the pressure required that is higher than on the chart above.
    Is this correct?
    Originally posted by Mishomeister
    No! Absolutely NO...

    The clue is the word "MAX PRESS" - that's the absolute maximum pressure the tyre is rated for, and nothing whatsoever to do with the correct pressure for your car. Which is what's on the filler cap.

    Now, what SIZE tyre is that...?
    • Ebe Scrooge
    • By Ebe Scrooge 22nd May 17, 9:09 PM
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    Ebe Scrooge
    "This is what is written on the tyre. It looks lik it indicated the pressure required that is higher than on the chart above.
    Is this correct?"

    No. That is the maximum pressure that the tyre can take. The correct pressure is more dependant on the vehicle and the load, and should be stated in your vehicle handbook.

    Most vehicles will have a slightly higher pressure stated for a "full load". But please, refer to the handbook, not the tyre itself. Tyres are designed to fit a range of vehicles, vehicles are designed ( and tested, and safety-approved ) with a particular tyre specification in mind.
    I may not know much about art, but I know what I like.
    • Mishomeister
    • By Mishomeister 22nd May 17, 9:40 PM
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    Mishomeister
    . But please, refer to the handbook, not the tyre itself.
    Originally posted by Ebe Scrooge
    The handbook refers me back to the table at the top of this post. This table has too many numbers on it so I can't figure out which one apply to my car.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 22nd May 17, 9:49 PM
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    AdrianC
    The handbook refers me back to the table at the top of this post. This table has too many numbers on it so I can't figure out which one apply to my car.
    Originally posted by Mishomeister
    What.
    Size.
    Tyres.
    Are.
    Fitted.
    To.
    Your.
    Car?

    Each tyre size has two pairs of figures - one for lightly loaded, one for heavily loaded.
    Each pair of figures is front and rear, according to the diagram of the car.

    If they're <say> 185/60 14, then you look that row up in the table.
    2.2bar front/2.0bar rear lightly loaded, or 2.3bar front/2.7bar rear if heavily loaded.

    If you really need them in PSI, then just type "<whatever> bar in psi" into google. 2.0bar is 29psi. 2.2bar is 32psi. 2.3bar is just over 33psi. 2.7bar is 39psi.
    Last edited by AdrianC; 22-05-2017 at 9:54 PM.
    • rdr
    • By rdr 23rd May 17, 10:56 AM
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    • 212 Thanks
    rdr
    Well I certainly use kPa in my engineering calculations, lot easier than pounds force per square foot.

    And in a happy coincidence, much like the near equivalence between ton and tonne, then 1 bar is pretty much 100kPa.
    Originally posted by bigadaj
    That's because 1 bar = 100 000 Pa = 100 kPa by definition, and probably 1 bar is about 1 atmosphere by design.
    • almillar
    • By almillar 23rd May 17, 1:00 PM
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    almillar
    The handbook refers me back to the table at the top of this post. This table has too many numbers on it so I can't figure out which one apply to my car.
    I don't want to be nasty, but you shouldn't be driving if you can't work this out with our help. Answer Adrian's question above - what size is you tyre - you've already taken a photo of part of your tyre, take a photo of another part of it with the size on it. Hopefully it'll match one of the sizes listed in the table. Then you've got ONE LINE of the table to read.

    Is your car:
    a) 155/80 R13
    b) 165/70 R14
    c) 185/60 R14
    d) 185/55 R15
    e) 195/50 R15
    f) 205/45 R16
    g) other?
    • reeac
    • By reeac 23rd May 17, 1:25 PM
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    reeac
    That's because 1 bar = 100 000 Pa = 100 kPa by definition, and probably 1 bar is about 1 atmosphere by design.
    Originally posted by rdr
    No probably about it. One bar is one atmosphere by definition.
    • DoaM
    • By DoaM 23rd May 17, 3:09 PM
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    DoaM
    1 atm is 1.01325 bar, so it is about 1 atm not exactly it.

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    • Jackmydad
    • By Jackmydad 23rd May 17, 3:32 PM
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    Jackmydad
    In the words of the Beach Boys.
    "Bar Bar Bar Bar Barbara Ann"

    It's all academic without the tyre size
    • almillar
    • By almillar 24th May 17, 12:43 PM
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    almillar
    Also in the words of the Beach Boys -

    'God only knows' (without the tyre size)
    • Richard53
    • By Richard53 24th May 17, 3:42 PM
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    Richard53
    As the tyre sings "round, round, get around, I get around".
    If all misfortunes were laid in one common heap whence everyone must take an equal portion, most people would be contented to take their own and depart. (Attrib. to Socrates)
    • Mobeer
    • By Mobeer 24th May 17, 10:45 PM
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    Mobeer
    As the tyre sings "round, round, get around, I get around".
    Originally posted by Richard53
    Don't be silly - that wasn't a tyre, that was a tea bag:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1gUxFXqcG8
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