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  • FIRST POST
    • elsien
    • By elsien 17th May 17, 11:24 AM
    • 14,754Posts
    • 36,680Thanks
    elsien
    Chemotherapy and hospital visits
    • #1
    • 17th May 17, 11:24 AM
    Chemotherapy and hospital visits 17th May 17 at 11:24 AM
    I have a male relative in hospital having intensive chemotherapy. It is not someone I know particularly well but I am the nearest person to the hospital he has had to travel to for treatment and he has said he would like a visit.
    I know little about his interests - I'm not sure he has many, due to ongoing serious MH issues - but would like to take something along to make the hospital stay a little more bearable. It's not a prolonged stay, but even so there must be something someone in hospital would appreciate however I am stumped for ideas as I'm not sure how well the usual grapes, chocolate etc would go down with all the potential side effects.
    Any suggestions?
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
Page 1
    • Izadora
    • By Izadora 17th May 17, 11:46 AM
    • 1,298 Posts
    • 3,721 Thanks
    Izadora
    • #2
    • 17th May 17, 11:46 AM
    • #2
    • 17th May 17, 11:46 AM
    Would the MH issues make sudoku, or other puzzle books, difficult?
    As long as they're not too difficult, and therefore likely to frustrate me, I find that logic problems are a really good way to clear my brain and pass time.
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 17th May 17, 12:30 PM
    • 9,154 Posts
    • 11,507 Thanks
    hazyjo
    • #3
    • 17th May 17, 12:30 PM
    • #3
    • 17th May 17, 12:30 PM
    There was a similar thread a while back about what to take someone in hospital, possibly with cancer, but could be remembering it wrong - I'll see if I can find it.
    2017 wins: Opera tickets; film preview; lipstick; Ideal Home Show tickets + afternoon tea & bottle of Champagne; 2 cases of NKD; notebook; bath rack; books; film Premiere; Broadchurch DVDs; lipbalms; hamper (food/wine/Echo Dot/Jo Malone goodies)
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 17th May 17, 12:36 PM
    • 9,154 Posts
    • 11,507 Thanks
    hazyjo
    • #4
    • 17th May 17, 12:36 PM
    • #4
    • 17th May 17, 12:36 PM
    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=309802




    This one's completely different, but might give ideas http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=4114121
    2017 wins: Opera tickets; film preview; lipstick; Ideal Home Show tickets + afternoon tea & bottle of Champagne; 2 cases of NKD; notebook; bath rack; books; film Premiere; Broadchurch DVDs; lipbalms; hamper (food/wine/Echo Dot/Jo Malone goodies)
    • reehsetin
    • By reehsetin 17th May 17, 12:50 PM
    • 4,801 Posts
    • 4,537 Thanks
    reehsetin
    • #5
    • 17th May 17, 12:50 PM
    • #5
    • 17th May 17, 12:50 PM
    Would the MH issues make sudoku, or other puzzle books, difficult?
    As long as they're not too difficult, and therefore likely to frustrate me, I find that logic problems are a really good way to clear my brain and pass time.
    Originally posted by Izadora
    I'd avoid sudoku type puzzles personally, no matter how easy the fog of 'chemo brain' might make it much harder/more frustrating
    wordsearch / colouring style books maybe better as not too much thinking at all

    What about a phone or tablet loaded up with music/ games / netflix or youtube shows
    Yes Your Dukeiness
    • Squidger21
    • By Squidger21 17th May 17, 1:03 PM
    • 9 Posts
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    Squidger21
    • #6
    • 17th May 17, 1:03 PM
    • #6
    • 17th May 17, 1:03 PM
    When my mum was having chemo, her friend put together a bag for her with lots of little gifts, including a colouring book and a pack of colouring pencils, a wordsearch book, a set of dominoes, as well as some small bags of sweets and chocolates. This was all very appreciated.
    • kingfisherblue
    • By kingfisherblue 17th May 17, 1:44 PM
    • 7,170 Posts
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    kingfisherblue
    • #7
    • 17th May 17, 1:44 PM
    • #7
    • 17th May 17, 1:44 PM
    Dry skin is a problem when in hospital, so a moisturiser or handcream may be appreciated. A decent soup with fresh rolls, or another simple but tasty meal if the person isn't having problems with eating or sickness - hospital food can be poor in some places. Cereal bars, dried fruit, mini cheeses (in a lunch box with ice packs) or other snacks might be a better option if you can't take in hot food. Warm socks, as I believe that some people get very cold feet.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 17th May 17, 1:47 PM
    • 37,484 Posts
    • 33,793 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    • #8
    • 17th May 17, 1:47 PM
    • #8
    • 17th May 17, 1:47 PM
    Manly handcream and lipsalve, tissues (maybe kids ones in a jokey box?), maybe postcards / letter writing stuff?
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 1 shawl, 2 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure, 1 sock ...
    Current projects: 1 shawl, t'other sock (just about to turn the heel!)
    • thorsoak
    • By thorsoak 17th May 17, 2:08 PM
    • 5,403 Posts
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    thorsoak
    • #9
    • 17th May 17, 2:08 PM
    • #9
    • 17th May 17, 2:08 PM
    Go and visit your relative, reconnect with him, and ask him what he would like xxxx
    • Caroline_a
    • By Caroline_a 17th May 17, 2:20 PM
    • 3,850 Posts
    • 10,615 Thanks
    Caroline_a
    When I was having chemo I couldnt be bothered with anything complicated! No films, highbrow books, or anything that took much brain power! Also chemo changes your tastes, so I would ask before you take in any sort of food. I even went off chocolate!! (It comes back though after chemo :-) )

    What would I have liked? Just company really, although I'm pretty good on my own. I guess it does depend on the individual.
    • LEJC
    • By LEJC 17th May 17, 2:25 PM
    • 8,749 Posts
    • 55,132 Thanks
    LEJC
    Go and visit your relative, reconnect with him, and ask him what he would like xxxx
    Originally posted by thorsoak
    I'm probably very in agreement with this....if he has asked you to visit,then maybe it's the company he wants rather than a physical gift.

    sometimes its just someone to pass the hours away with who can share a little conversation to help break up the monotony.

    I am sure once you make one visit the ideas will flow about something that could be bought along to the next visit.

    is it maybe as simple as taking in a newspaper as not all hospitals have a visiting hospital trolly nowadays,and even the hospital shop can seem so far away when you are ward bound.
    frugal October...£45.59 of £40 food shopping spend for the 2 of us!
    Jan £41.60/£40
    Feb £54.58/£40...gave up this month 15/2
    Mar £37.02/£40...lots of help via a gift card and vouchers
    May
    2017 toiletries 93 out 83 in ...£13.96 spend
    • mellymoo74
    • By mellymoo74 17th May 17, 2:36 PM
    • 5,655 Posts
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    mellymoo74
    Elsien
    Dad went nuts for frozen frubes
    Sweets also go down well

    OH is loving flavoured water
    • PeacefulWaters
    • By PeacefulWaters 17th May 17, 3:01 PM
    • 6,563 Posts
    • 8,050 Thanks
    PeacefulWaters
    Ask him and deliver on it.

    But chat to him while your there.

    A SIM card with big data allowance would do me.
    • itsanne
    • By itsanne 17th May 17, 7:34 PM
    • 4,491 Posts
    • 10,368 Thanks
    itsanne
    I'd ask him what he would like, especially as it may depend on how he feels with the chemo.

    The most useful things when I was in hospital were an eye mask and ear plugs (wax, not foam). Also useful were an insulated water bottle (meant a cold drink rather than the luke warm water once its initial chill has worn off), decent hand wash (the hospital stuff was very drying), good hand cream and mints to suck. An ice lolly went down a treat too.

    Does he have anyone to wash his clothes/pyjamas? Could he be taken out of the ward in a wheelchair? A change of scene can be a real bonus.

    Your company is probably the best gift ot all.
    . . .I did not speak out

    Then they came for me
    And there was no one left
    To speak out for me..

    Martin Niemoller
    • elsien
    • By elsien 17th May 17, 7:45 PM
    • 14,754 Posts
    • 36,680 Thanks
    elsien
    Not sure about the company aspect - not spoken to him in years because when we visited the family he'd hide himself away as soon as we got there. But willing to give it a go although lord knows what we'll find to talk about.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 17th May 17, 7:49 PM
    • 1,340 Posts
    • 1,127 Thanks
    parking_question_chap
    The main thing will be the company as in just a person yo be with him for a little while. He will not care that you have not spoken in years or dont have the same interests.

    A few nibbles would be fine.
    • worried jim
    • By worried jim 17th May 17, 7:50 PM
    • 8,271 Posts
    • 12,532 Thanks
    worried jim
    Space cakes.
    "Only two things are infinite-the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not so sure about the universe"
    Albert Einstein
    • Caroline_a
    • By Caroline_a 17th May 17, 9:48 PM
    • 3,850 Posts
    • 10,615 Thanks
    Caroline_a
    Elsien
    Dad went nuts for frozen frubes
    Sweets also go down well

    OH is loving flavoured water
    Originally posted by mellymoo74
    Oooo I just remembered, I went bonkers for Jubblys! As I was having treatment in winter they weren't easy to come by so my girls bought them wherever they saw them. We now have most of the UK's supply of them.... and I'm better! Not sure I could face any now.....
    • itsanne
    • By itsanne 17th May 17, 9:50 PM
    • 4,491 Posts
    • 10,368 Thanks
    itsanne
    Not sure about the company aspect - not spoken to him in years because when we visited the family he'd hide himself away as soon as we got there. But willing to give it a go although lord knows what we'll find to talk about.
    Originally posted by elsien
    He might just like smeone to be there, not necessarily talking lots. When I was in hospital, OH spent most of the time with me but brought books and crosswords for himself. You could do something similar and then play it by ear.
    . . .I did not speak out

    Then they came for me
    And there was no one left
    To speak out for me..

    Martin Niemoller
    • alk29
    • By alk29 18th May 17, 12:58 PM
    • 34 Posts
    • 373 Thanks
    alk29
    We got my aunt a hamper with various bits in.

    The things she used most from it were an insulated mug to keep cold drinks cold / hot drinks hot and a small fleece throw (cheap one from Primark) that she could either use as an extra cover or put round her shoulders. Normally the wards were very warm but close to the aircon vents it was pretty chilly and she felt the extremes of hot and cold a lot more than normal.
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