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  • FIRST POST
    • gilbutre
    • By gilbutre 17th May 17, 8:05 AM
    • 330Posts
    • 51Thanks
    gilbutre
    How to stabilise a wall plug within a far too big hole?
    • #1
    • 17th May 17, 8:05 AM
    How to stabilise a wall plug within a far too big hole? 17th May 17 at 8:05 AM
    The bit of my rotary hammer drill (same as that one) rotate with an angle resulting in a horribly bad precision drilling (and holes far too big for the plugs I intend to use). Sidenote: I need this type of hammer because the external walls of my house are too hard for hammer drills.

    Is there a way, once the gaping hole is done, to maybe fill it with cement or something and at some point to insert the plug so that when the cement is complete the plug is stable?

    Maybe some better solution exists too, I'm open to suggestions.
Page 1
    • Mr.Generous
    • By Mr.Generous 17th May 17, 8:15 AM
    • 1,591 Posts
    • 2,387 Thanks
    Mr.Generous
    • #2
    • 17th May 17, 8:15 AM
    • #2
    • 17th May 17, 8:15 AM
    Put the plug in then hammer in some slivers of timber to make it tight. Before nylon plugs were invented we fixed stuff by just using bits of wood hammered in tight. If its a small gap something like cocktail sticks will do, if its very loose (buy a new drill bit) you can use anything up to a pencil size.

    The tongue from old floor boards makes great plugging timber if you have any. You can buy plugging compound if you really need it. I wouldn't bother. I think you need a smaller drill bit or one that's not bent. SDS bits come in various sizes. 6mm good for most std plugs.
    • Ebe Scrooge
    • By Ebe Scrooge 17th May 17, 8:17 AM
    • 3,696 Posts
    • 3,073 Thanks
    Ebe Scrooge
    • #3
    • 17th May 17, 8:17 AM
    • #3
    • 17th May 17, 8:17 AM
    The simplest way would be to mix up a small amount of mortar, fill the hole and let it set. Then you can re-drill the hole.


    The only thing I would say - if whatever you're drilling the hole for is pretty heavy, I'd be tempted to fill the hole then drill a different hole an inch or so to the side, if possible. Plugs/screws that are inserted into mortar are not as strong as those drilled into solid brick.
    I may not know much about art, but I know what I like.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 17th May 17, 8:50 AM
    • 5,880 Posts
    • 4,625 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    • #4
    • 17th May 17, 8:50 AM
    • #4
    • 17th May 17, 8:50 AM
    Could you use a different drill bit or bigger plugs?

    • MisterP123
    • By MisterP123 17th May 17, 9:57 AM
    • 156 Posts
    • 161 Thanks
    MisterP123
    • #5
    • 17th May 17, 9:57 AM
    • #5
    • 17th May 17, 9:57 AM
    It shouldn't rotate at an angle. Probably a new (good quality) SDS bit will help.

    You can always stick some matches in if the holes not too big, or a bigger plug and larger screw.
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 17th May 17, 10:16 AM
    • 2,514 Posts
    • 1,392 Thanks
    TheCyclingProgrammer
    • #6
    • 17th May 17, 10:16 AM
    • #6
    • 17th May 17, 10:16 AM
    http://www.wickes.co.uk/Fischer-Wet-%27n%27-Fix-Pack-10/p/511151

    Always worth keeping a pack in the toolbox.
    • Wookey
    • By Wookey 17th May 17, 10:38 AM
    • 658 Posts
    • 314 Thanks
    Wookey
    • #7
    • 17th May 17, 10:38 AM
    • #7
    • 17th May 17, 10:38 AM
    As MrGenerous says plug it with a piece of timber or dowel, whittle down one end into a slow taper with a chisel or stanley knife and then hammer it into the wall and then chisel it of flush with the wall, you may need to drill a small pilot hole into the plug to give your screw an easier start.

    Buy a new drill bit, it sounds like the drill has been dropped onto the drill bit to bend it slightly or something heavy dropped onto it.
    Norn Iron Club member No 353
    • Ganga
    • By Ganga 17th May 17, 10:43 AM
    • 583 Posts
    • 275 Thanks
    Ganga
    • #8
    • 17th May 17, 10:43 AM
    • #8
    • 17th May 17, 10:43 AM
    http://www.wickes.co.uk/Fischer-Wet-%27n%27-Fix-Pack-10/p/511151

    Always worth keeping a pack in the toolbox.
    Originally posted by TheCyclingProgrammer
    Good idea,evertime i drill in plasterboard end up with bigger hole.
    ITS NOT EASY TO GET EVERYTHING WRONG ,I HAVE TO WORK HARD TO DO IT!
    • trailingspouse
    • By trailingspouse 17th May 17, 11:24 AM
    • 1,981 Posts
    • 2,743 Thanks
    trailingspouse
    • #9
    • 17th May 17, 11:24 AM
    • #9
    • 17th May 17, 11:24 AM
    From experience of renovating several elderly houses, I would say the traditional solution is old newspaper...
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 17th May 17, 11:52 AM
    • 28,841 Posts
    • 17,259 Thanks
    getmore4less
    definitely invest in some straight bits so you can drill more accurate sized holes.

    could upgrade from a plug to a wall anchor but might be overkill for a lightweight job.
    • gilbutre
    • By gilbutre 17th May 17, 11:55 AM
    • 330 Posts
    • 51 Thanks
    gilbutre
    Thanks all for the input! My bit looks flawless and isn't bent or anything. I really don't understand why it fits with an angle, there was no angle last time I used it a year ago or two.
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 17th May 17, 11:56 AM
    • 1,098 Posts
    • 1,034 Thanks
    Grenage
    Wood, as above. The old ways are often the least expensive, and most effective.
    • bertiewhite
    • By bertiewhite 17th May 17, 12:08 PM
    • 383 Posts
    • 357 Thanks
    bertiewhite
    Small wedges of wood get my vote as well.
    • ukmike
    • By ukmike 17th May 17, 3:31 PM
    • 694 Posts
    • 346 Thanks
    ukmike
    After every bonfire night,i collect the used rocket wooden sticks to plug bigger holes.
    • Money_Grabber13579
    • By Money_Grabber13579 17th May 17, 5:17 PM
    • 2,828 Posts
    • 1,371 Thanks
    Money_Grabber13579
    Are you sure the drill bit is inserted into the drill correctly? My drill bits sometime wobble but it's just a matter of reseating them and it works perfectly.
    Northern Ireland club member No 382
    • Risteard
    • By Risteard 17th May 17, 5:34 PM
    • 607 Posts
    • 190 Thanks
    Risteard
    6mm good for most std plugs.
    Originally posted by Mr.Generous
    5.5mm is better for red rawl plugs.
    • Risteard
    • By Risteard 17th May 17, 5:35 PM
    • 607 Posts
    • 190 Thanks
    Risteard
    Thanks all for the input! My bit looks flawless and isn't bent or anything. I really don't understand why it fits with an angle, there was no angle last time I used it a year ago or two.
    Originally posted by gilbutre
    The bearings gone in the chuck?
    • keithmac
    • By keithmac 17th May 17, 6:17 PM
    • 35 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    keithmac
    I go 1mm or 2mm down on the masonary drill and test the plug in there first.

    A lot easier to go up a size than down one!.

    Some bricks, concrete react differently to hammer drills/ SDS than others for some reason.
    • ColinFishwick
    • By ColinFishwick 17th May 17, 7:13 PM
    • 675 Posts
    • 841 Thanks
    ColinFishwick
    I often use wood to plug a larger hole, as said its the old way they did things and it lasts. You can get epoxy fillers that can do the job quickly last time i look think polyfilla did one or use polyfilla and let it set over a night or two

    http://www.polycell.co.uk/product/polycell-plug-fix-polyfilla/
    • Mr.Generous
    • By Mr.Generous 17th May 17, 7:35 PM
    • 1,591 Posts
    • 2,387 Thanks
    Mr.Generous
    5.5mm is better for red rawl plugs.
    Originally posted by Risteard
    Ah ok, we mainly use brown plasplugs (because i bought a bucket full really cheap) or the superb Fischer SX plugs that always grip. Both are better with a 6mm. Electrical back boxes are probably ok with red (smaller) plugs I'm not sure what size bit we use for red you will be.

    I had to laugh at the guy who said he collected rocket sticks after bonfire night, I have picked these up too, ideal for plugging holes in door frames when moving the hinges.

    Useful thread for anyone doing a bit of handyman work or DIY!
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