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  • FIRST POST
    • Katiehound
    • By Katiehound 7th May 17, 3:22 PM
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    Katiehound
    Dietary advice for health problems
    • #1
    • 7th May 17, 3:22 PM
    Dietary advice for health problems 7th May 17 at 3:22 PM
    Didn't know what to put in the title but I came across an article in Good Housekeeping about Jane Clarke (a well respected nutritionist.)
    She has set up a website / forum/ blog to help people with specific health problems eg cancer, dementia, heart disease and their carers with advice how to improve their diet.
    Tips for lose of appetite, difficulties swallowing etc

    You can sign up for monthly e-mail

    I'm certainly going to book mark the page

    https://www.nourishbyjaneclarke.com/
    Being polite and pleasant doesn't cost anything!

    If you found my posting helpful please hit the "Thanks" button!
    Thank You
Page 1
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 7th May 17, 3:31 PM
    • 8,016 Posts
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    teddysmum
    • #2
    • 7th May 17, 3:31 PM
    • #2
    • 7th May 17, 3:31 PM
    The specialist sites for health problems usually have their own diet/recipe sections.


    Be aware that a nutritionist is not a dietician, the latter having a professional qualification (usually a degree). Anyone can set up as a nutritionist.
    • Katiehound
    • By Katiehound 7th May 17, 3:45 PM
    • 3,591 Posts
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    Katiehound
    • #3
    • 7th May 17, 3:45 PM
    • #3
    • 7th May 17, 3:45 PM
    If you read the 'about me' link you will see :
    Jane Clarke, BSc (Honours) SRD, is Britain’s most trusted Nutritionist and a trained Cordon Bleu Chef, whose belief is grounded in the simple statement that “food nourishes your life, not just your body”.

    She has worked with/for David Beckham & Jamie Oliver.
    Jane runs a specialist cancer and dementia nutrition practice

    Might be worth a look (or not) and might help someone
    Being polite and pleasant doesn't cost anything!

    If you found my posting helpful please hit the "Thanks" button!
    Thank You
    • Toothsmith
    • By Toothsmith 7th Jun 17, 12:04 PM
    • 8,695 Posts
    • 10,344 Thanks
    Toothsmith
    • #4
    • 7th Jun 17, 12:04 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Jun 17, 12:04 PM
    If you read the 'about me' link you will see :
    Jane Clarke, BSc (Honours) SRD, is Britain’s most trusted Nutritionist and a trained Cordon Bleu Chef, whose belief is grounded in the simple statement that “food nourishes your life, not just your body”.

    She has worked with/for David Beckham & Jamie Oliver.
    Jane runs a specialist cancer and dementia nutrition practice

    Might be worth a look (or not) and might help someone
    Originally posted by Katiehound
    But - she has written this herself!

    Who can forget Dr Gillian McKeith?

    Or, to give her her proper title - Gillian McKeith!
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
    • gettingtheresometime
    • By gettingtheresometime 7th Jun 17, 12:22 PM
    • 2,569 Posts
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    gettingtheresometime
    • #5
    • 7th Jun 17, 12:22 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Jun 17, 12:22 PM
    I have to be honest unless her articles were backed up by other independent websites, I'd take everything she said with a pinch of salt regardless of who she has worked with
    Lloyds OD / Natwest OD / PO CC / Wescott cleared thanks to the 1 debt v 100 day challenge


    Next on the list - the Argos Card!
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 7th Jun 17, 12:32 PM
    • 27,977 Posts
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    Mojisola
    • #6
    • 7th Jun 17, 12:32 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Jun 17, 12:32 PM
    Be aware that a nutritionist is not a dietician, the latter having a professional qualification (usually a degree). Anyone can set up as a nutritionist.
    Originally posted by teddysmum
    She says that she is a qualified dietician - BSc (Honours) SRD
    • Toothsmith
    • By Toothsmith 7th Jun 17, 12:58 PM
    • 8,695 Posts
    • 10,344 Thanks
    Toothsmith
    • #7
    • 7th Jun 17, 12:58 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Jun 17, 12:58 PM
    Strange you would then call yourself a title associated with the quackier end of the spectrum.

    Maybe not registered with professional body for some reason?
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 7th Jun 17, 1:20 PM
    • 27,977 Posts
    • 71,129 Thanks
    Mojisola
    • #8
    • 7th Jun 17, 1:20 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Jun 17, 1:20 PM
    Strange you would then call yourself a title associated with the quackier end of the spectrum.

    Maybe not registered with professional body for some reason?
    Originally posted by Toothsmith
    This is her explanation -
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1077359/Jane-Clarke-You-shouldnt-listen-nutritionists.html
    "If you haven't guessed already, I am a dietitian. I only call myself a nutritionist because people find the concept easier (a dietitian sounds like someone on a weightloss mission)"

    No idea why she isn't registered with a professional body.
    • Toothsmith
    • By Toothsmith 7th Jun 17, 3:41 PM
    • 8,695 Posts
    • 10,344 Thanks
    Toothsmith
    • #9
    • 7th Jun 17, 3:41 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Jun 17, 3:41 PM

    No idea why she isn't registered with a professional body.
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    She might be - I've not checked. It was just a theory as to why she didn't call herself one.
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
    • Toothsmith
    • By Toothsmith 7th Jun 17, 3:46 PM
    • 8,695 Posts
    • 10,344 Thanks
    Toothsmith
    Have just checked on the Health & Care Professions Council website, and a Jane Clarke is registered as a dietician.
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 17th Jun 17, 10:10 PM
    • 22,775 Posts
    • 87,591 Thanks
    Jojo the Tightfisted
    This is her explanation -
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1077359/Jane-Clarke-You-shouldnt-listen-nutritionists.html
    "If you haven't guessed already, I am a dietitian. I only call myself a nutritionist because people find the concept easier (a dietitian sounds like someone on a weightloss mission)"

    No idea why she isn't registered with a professional body.
    Originally posted by Mojisola

    I read something a couple of days ago that Dieticians are required to model current health recommendations and not follow restrictive regimes themselves - maybe making an income from 'cancer' and 'dementia' diets mean she would be at risk of breaking professional regulations if she called herself a dietician? Or there's another Jane Clarke whose hard work and qualification has got her on that body's register? It's not exactly an unusual name, after all.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 17th Jun 17, 10:21 PM
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    Just been on her site.

    [narrows eyes]

    Her article on diet to deal with Rheumatoid Arthritis starts with an image of an elderly person with osteoarthritis. She then goes on to talk about writing on Gransnet before talking about avoiding acidic foods, avoiding red meat and 'patients' finding their symptoms disappear when cutting out sugar. But to keep eating fruit (presumably the glucose/sucrose and fructose in fruit is magically different from the glucose/sucrose/fructose in other foods, such as the many cake recipes she has on the site.)


    She can go take a running leap if she can't even get the difference between autoimmune disease and wear and tear correct, whether she has genuine qualifications or not, as far as I'm concerned.

    Unless, of course somebody has had cancer - then they can bang out two and half grand plus flights for a week of massage and yoga and psychotherapy sessions with her sister in a posh villa in Portgual.

    Last edited by Jojo the Tightfisted; 17-06-2017 at 10:28 PM.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 18th Jun 17, 3:56 PM
    • 8,016 Posts
    • 4,778 Thanks
    teddysmum
    Just been on her site.

    [narrows eyes]

    Her article on diet to deal with Rheumatoid Arthritis starts with an image of an elderly person with osteoarthritis. She then goes on to talk about writing on Gransnet
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    The first person with RA that I met was a girl, aged 12, who already had sight so poor that she could barely read the blackboard from the front row of class and would soon need walking aids.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 18th Jun 17, 4:07 PM
    • 27,977 Posts
    • 71,129 Thanks
    Mojisola
    Her article on diet to deal with Rheumatoid Arthritis starts with an image of an elderly person with osteoarthritis. She then goes on to talk about writing on Gransnet before talking about avoiding acidic foods, avoiding red meat and 'patients' finding their symptoms disappear when cutting out sugar. But to keep eating fruit (presumably the glucose/sucrose and fructose in fruit is magically different from the glucose/sucrose/fructose in other foods, such as the many cake recipes she has on the site.)

    She can go take a running leap if she can't even get the difference between autoimmune disease and wear and tear correct, whether she has genuine qualifications or not, as far as I'm concerned.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    She does say "Anyone living with rheumatoid arthritis, the more common osteoarthritis, or gout (another form of arthritis), knows the tremendous pain and discomfort of inflamed joints." so, although the blog is prompted by Rheumatoid Arthritis Week, she does open it up to all kinds of arthritis.

    I don't find this to be poor advice - "Rather than avoid sugar entirely, I suggest eating naturally sweet foods, such as fresh, baked or stewed fruits, rather than those with added sugar."

    She's obviously got an eye on the mainstream market in order to make a living and is a fan of the Eat Well Plate and promotes the bad fats/cholesterol myth, both of which would stop me following her.
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 19th Jun 17, 11:38 PM
    • 22,775 Posts
    • 87,591 Thanks
    Jojo the Tightfisted
    The first person with RA that I met was a girl, aged 12, who already had sight so poor that she could barely read the blackboard from the front row of class and would soon need walking aids.
    Originally posted by teddysmum
    Had it myself since I was five and have been wearing assorted bandages, braces and taking medications ever since. There was a girl two years above me who was so unwell by the time she was 10, she had to sit on a chair beside the teachers when we were all sat on the floor for assemblies. One of my friends was diagnosed at 7 and had her first intraarticular joint aspirations and injections at 9.

    Where I work, there was a 14 year old when I started there who was already using a motorised wheelchair, on a reduced timetable and was brought to school by taxi. The reason she was there rather than schools nearer her home was because the premises had better accessibility than any of the new academies (most of the site is ground level and those few bits that aren't have lifts). They'd obviously sorted all that out for the secondary application when she was 10/nearly 11.


    The whole point of creating awareness about RA is to differentiate between that and the conditions that are more associated with old age - ask anybody with RA/PsA what the most frustrating comment is that they've heard and it will usually be the old faithful 'You aren't old enough for that'. They're completely different diseases with utterly different aetiologies.

    She's actually harming RA awareness by such a fluff piece. And promoting woo woo in the acidity nonsense and in suggesting that dried fruit is a better form of sugar than sugar. They both provide extra calories, they both cause tooth decay - saying dried fruit contains some fibre would be valid, but cutting out something that turns to glucose in the body in favour of something that turns into glucose in the body is utter [aaaannnnd the swear filter kicks in], especially when making oblique references to anecdotal evidence not supported by any particular peer reviewed studies.

    Actually useful things she could have written about would have included recipes that didn't need prolonged preparation, chopping, standing over a stove or bending down to retrieve from the oven. But they might not have looked quite so Instagram friendly. She could chucked some edible flowers on top, though, so I don't see her problem there.



    Mind you, ten places on that 'wellness holiday'. Making up to twenty five grand in a week isn't bad going for a lowly dietician. Especially as it would do nothing for the physical health of the people concerned - bet she has a warm glow inside as she goes to the bank sleep at night, though.
    Last edited by Jojo the Tightfisted; 19-06-2017 at 11:40 PM.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 20th Jun 17, 4:04 PM
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    • 4,778 Thanks
    teddysmum
    There's is similar ignorance over type 1 and type 2 diabetes and within cases of type 2. I have type 2 (no medication needed) and am not or ever have been obese (just a little extra round the middle as would be expected in ones late 60s) and my husband's friend , who is on insulin, is thin as a rake and always has been. We aren't all lazy greedy guzzlers.
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