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    • Corona
    • By Corona 23rd Apr 17, 8:22 PM
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    Corona
    Present for someone retiring?
    • #1
    • 23rd Apr 17, 8:22 PM
    Present for someone retiring? 23rd Apr 17 at 8:22 PM
    We have a dear friend who has announced that he is taking early retirement in 6 months time (when he's 60). He's in good health and not swimming in cash (I suspect the early retirement was prompted when his cousin - same age as him - suddenly keeled over last year).

    Anyway, we would like to get him a present but nothing related to a hobby - he doesn't really have any, and not very expensive (we don't have serious cash). Maybe a book on how to plan for retirement, or something less serious ??

    Is anyone here retired and can remember getting a retirement present that they found really useful?

    Thanks.



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    Last edited by Former MSE Jessica; 06-06-2017 at 3:19 PM.
Page 1
    • Ilona
    • By Ilona 24th Apr 17, 8:51 AM
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    Ilona
    • #2
    • 24th Apr 17, 8:51 AM
    • #2
    • 24th Apr 17, 8:51 AM
    I had a retirement and 60th birthday party and told everyone not to buy me a present as I have everything I need. I said if they wish they could give an anonymous donation (in envelope) and I would pass it on to my favourite charity.

    Your friend is going to be a bit bored if he has no hobbies. Does he do nothing outside work? Dig a bit deeper and ask him what his plans are.

    Ilona
    I love skip diving
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 24th Apr 17, 10:20 AM
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    Owain Moneysaver
    • #3
    • 24th Apr 17, 10:20 AM
    • #3
    • 24th Apr 17, 10:20 AM
    A dog, or golf clubs. He needs to get out of the house and keep active.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • Gers
    • By Gers 24th Apr 17, 12:44 PM
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    Gers
    • #4
    • 24th Apr 17, 12:44 PM
    • #4
    • 24th Apr 17, 12:44 PM
    When I retired a couple of years ago aged 60 I specifically said I didn't want anything I had to dust or eat.

    The kind colleagues put together a memory book, photos and writings about things we had done or shared together. As a couple of us had gone abroad to do some funded work there were some good photos and memories. Others added in anecdotes from working life together.

    It doesn't need dusting and when I come across it it makes me smile.

    No leaving do either, a small afternoon tea with five especially dear colleagues. Then gone!

    IN EDIT - didn't answer the question properly, sorry. A National Trust membership? They also do a great volunteer scheme if he wants to go out and plant trees etc. If you're in Scotland the scheme is here.
    Last edited by Gers; 24-04-2017 at 12:47 PM.
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 24th Apr 17, 2:49 PM
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    dunroving
    • #5
    • 24th Apr 17, 2:49 PM
    • #5
    • 24th Apr 17, 2:49 PM
    I'd say definitely something that will help get him out and about. Difficult without knowing the person. Golf clubs might be the beginning of a new adventure for some people but an expensive paperweight for someone else (like me). Definitely not a dog. ;-)

    I think a conversation along the lines of "What do you plan to do with your time?" is in order, and then buy something that falls under that area. For his health, something either physical- or mental-activity related will help him stay healthy.

    But without knowing whether he hates sport, hiking, history, the outdoors, gyms, using gadgets, etc., it's impossible to be specific.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 24th Apr 17, 9:21 PM
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    Savvy_Sue
    • #6
    • 24th Apr 17, 9:21 PM
    • #6
    • 24th Apr 17, 9:21 PM
    It could be worth asking "what are you planning to do with yourself once you've retired?" and seeing if they come up with any "I've always wanted to ..." You might be able to get vouchers for taster sessions, eg I've just taken up Nordic Walking and my local group sells vouchers online! I'd thought about doing it for a couple of years, so if someone had given me a voucher that would have got me going.
    Still knitting!
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    • Fruittea
    • By Fruittea 25th May 17, 2:44 PM
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    Fruittea
    • #7
    • 25th May 17, 2:44 PM
    • #7
    • 25th May 17, 2:44 PM
    Does your friend live anywhere near a national park or walk. I received a compass and a book on the Cotswolds Way which was very nice. I think something that encourages an interest perhaps gardening or allotments.
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    • Bellisima
    • By Bellisima 7th Jun 17, 10:03 AM
    • 54 Posts
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    Bellisima
    • #8
    • 7th Jun 17, 10:03 AM
    • #8
    • 7th Jun 17, 10:03 AM
    My husband retired a few years ago and did not really have any hobbies as such. He is an avid reader and will spend hours in bookshops and charity shops searching for books. He also loves walking and takes a good one hour daily walk. Oh well that's two hobbies so far! He has no interest in golf "a good walk spoiled". Your colleague must have interests, if not hobbies, so a discreet chat will reveal all. My husband loves being retired and is never bored!
    • Molillie
    • By Molillie 11th Jun 17, 12:20 AM
    • 45 Posts
    • 157 Thanks
    Molillie
    • #9
    • 11th Jun 17, 12:20 AM
    • #9
    • 11th Jun 17, 12:20 AM
    Maybe for now spending time talking about his plans with him, as he might well need a chance to discuss things.
    One of my cousins, who lived all his life in Birmingham, was planning early retirement to the seaside, where he'd apparently always wanted to live. Sadly, he died after a heart attack, a year or so short of that time, and had apparently only told his mother about the seaside plan, as many of his friends said that they had no idea. He had also collected books on gardening, and lived in a flat without even a balcony.
    It has stuck in my mind as although he didn't get to have somewhere with a garden, or to live at the seaside, had he lived to retirement, and carried out his plans, his friends would have been very surprised to find out what his intentions were. So I suppose what I'm suggesting is that people don't always talk about their dreams, especially if they think that they can't afford them, or that they'd lose their support network, e.g. by moving.
    Another organisation to investigate might also be the University of the Third Age. If you browse for your area, and think what's on offer might appeal to him, you could maybe buy his first year's membership? The cost varies greatly, in my area, the two large towns both charge around £40 for a year, and the smaller towns and rural areas much less. The large towns offer a huge range of options. Good luck, I'm sure your friend will appreciate your support.
    • Bigmoney2
    • By Bigmoney2 12th Jun 17, 6:24 PM
    • 616 Posts
    • 451 Thanks
    Bigmoney2
    Maybe for now spending time talking about his plans with him, as he might well need a chance to discuss things.
    One of my cousins, who lived all his life in Birmingham, was planning early retirement to the seaside, where he'd apparently always wanted to live. Sadly, he died after a heart attack, a year or so short of that time, and had apparently only told his mother about the seaside plan, as many of his friends said that they had no idea. He had also collected books on gardening, and lived in a flat without even a balcony.
    It has stuck in my mind as although he didn't get to have somewhere with a garden, or to live at the seaside, had he lived to retirement, and carried out his plans, his friends would have been very surprised to find out what his intentions were. So I suppose what I'm suggesting is that people don't always talk about their dreams, especially if they think that they can't afford them, or that they'd lose their support network, e.g. by moving.
    Another organisation to investigate might also be the University of the Third Age. If you browse for your area, and think what's on offer might appeal to him, you could maybe buy his first year's membership? The cost varies greatly, in my area, the two large towns both charge around £40 for a year, and the smaller towns and rural areas much less. The large towns offer a huge range of options. Good luck, I'm sure your friend will appreciate your support.
    Originally posted by Molillie


    U3A membership is a great suggestion, My local one is £15 a year, plus costs for individual trips etc. There really is something for everyone, from walking groups to languages to bridge, art groups etc.
    http://www.u3a.org.uk/find-a-u3a.html




    You say he has no hobbies, well he is going to need to find something to do, and people to socialise with. It's a big jump from the structure of a workplace to retirement and very easy to become a recluse, or spend all day in the pub, I'm assuming he is on his own.


    You do need to sound him out, Nation Trust/English heritage also good options, but only if he is interested and able to get to some places.


    Local walking groups are also good and usually not much to join, as they are sociable and you say he is in good health.


    Depending where you live, are there any local interest books of places to visit, or put together a folder of leaflets for local attractions.
    Last edited by Bigmoney2; 12-06-2017 at 6:29 PM.
    • Bigmoney2
    • By Bigmoney2 12th Jun 17, 7:08 PM
    • 616 Posts
    • 451 Thanks
    Bigmoney2
    A few humorous books here


    https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_3_6?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=retirement+gifts&sprefix=retire%2Caps%2C1 0152&crid=34878N20XWGXP&rh=n%3A266239%2Ck%3Aretire ment+gifts


    https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_2_20?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=retirement+gifts+for+men&sprefix=retireme nt+gifts+for%2Caps%2C190&crid=2USSOBK7MJIKF&rh=i%3 Aaps%2Ck%3Aretirement+gifts+for+men
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