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    • AgentJR
    • By AgentJR 20th Apr 17, 2:14 PM
    • 19Posts
    • 2Thanks
    AgentJR
    AA Home Insurance: Damp
    • #1
    • 20th Apr 17, 2:14 PM
    AA Home Insurance: Damp 20th Apr 17 at 2:14 PM
    Hi

    Looking for some help please on a damp issue and our home insurance policy wording.

    I have read many articles about rising damp usually not being covered under insurance policies. However, having read our AA insurance police (link: https://www.theaa.com/insurance/pdf/buildings-insurance-policy-booklet-october-2015.pdf ) I can see no mention of damp at all.

    We own a 1929 chalet bungalow which ,many many years ago (date unknown) had a gable end extension built at the back. After the last batch of bad weather, we noticed a couple of 'wet' walls and damp patches in some rooms, as well as cracks and loose tiles in the main bathroom - all at the back of our property. We called in a builder who was recommended to us in dealing with damp issues, who 'suspects' the damp course has been compromised by the stone floor put in in the gable ended extension. All the damp is only apparent at this end of the property.

    The builder wont know for sure that this is the reason (although strongly suspects this is the reason) until he knocks out all the external plaster etc and strips back to the damp course to see what's going on. The estimate for redoing the damp course is in excess of 6k, which doesn't include making good any of the interior.

    I could call the insurer, however, I'm aware that any call is lodged as a 'claim' regardless of whether a claim is made, so I'm hoping for some advice first please?

    Thank you.
Page 1
    • Quentin
    • By Quentin 20th Apr 17, 2:39 PM
    • 31,275 Posts
    • 15,241 Thanks
    Quentin
    • #2
    • 20th Apr 17, 2:39 PM
    • #2
    • 20th Apr 17, 2:39 PM
    You are correct. Never contact your insurer about any loss unless you are certainly going to make a claim.

    Damp as a result of poor workmanship won't be covered by normal house insurance.

    Is there any guarantee with the paperwork regarding the extension to claim against?
    • AgentJR
    • By AgentJR 20th Apr 17, 2:48 PM
    • 19 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    AgentJR
    • #3
    • 20th Apr 17, 2:48 PM
    • #3
    • 20th Apr 17, 2:48 PM
    Thank you for your quick response.

    No paperwork. I believe the gable end was completed by one of the original owners back in the 1950s or there abouts. We had the previous owner take out an indemnity policy on planning/building regs permissions due to there not being a paper trail for alterations undertaken.

    It all seems a little unfair that the potential cause of this is down to something outside of our control. The house has been well maintained by us.

    I'm wondering whether the insurer might pay for the investigation (which would have to include taking off all the plaster etc)? At least this would reduce the builder's final bill.

    Also, a couple of other builders told us that they've known some insurer's agree to pay for the interior make good costs (but not the damp work itself), which again would help.

    I mainly posted this plea for help as the policy wording doesn't mention 'damp' at all (link previously provided).
    • Quentin
    • By Quentin 20th Apr 17, 3:21 PM
    • 31,275 Posts
    • 15,241 Thanks
    Quentin
    • #4
    • 20th Apr 17, 3:21 PM
    • #4
    • 20th Apr 17, 3:21 PM
    Yes, your policy may well cover any repairs/redecorating required following water ingress.

    (But isn't going to cover the work or investigation if it is down to poor workmanship whether or not you had any 'control'.

    Check that making a claim for redecorating etc would be cost effective (bearing in mind any impact a claim has on future premiums
    • AgentJR
    • By AgentJR 20th Apr 17, 4:29 PM
    • 19 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    AgentJR
    • #5
    • 20th Apr 17, 4:29 PM
    • #5
    • 20th Apr 17, 4:29 PM
    That's a good point, I will check the policy for redecorating. One of the rooms is the main bathroom where all the tiles etc have to come off and the wall re-plastered. I understand that there will be other walls too as the plaster has gone where the damp has got in, so I think it would be cost effective to claim.

    The reason I mentioned investigation is because it is only a suspicion and the only way to tell is to strip the exterior walls back which would form part of the investigation. Therefore, if covered this would reduce my builder's work.

    Interestingly, nowhere in the policy does it mention damp/rising damp. It does mention poor workmanship being excluded, but no mention of damp!
    • firefox1956
    • By firefox1956 20th Apr 17, 5:05 PM
    • 1,005 Posts
    • 556 Thanks
    firefox1956
    • #6
    • 20th Apr 17, 5:05 PM
    • #6
    • 20th Apr 17, 5:05 PM
    I would question why after all this time 'damp' has suddenly become a problem ??
    If your 'builder' 'suspects the damp course has been compromised by the stone floor put in in the gable ended extension.' why is he knocking back all the 'external' plaster ??
    Just sounds a bit like he could be making a 6 k job out of it !!


    • paddyandstumpy
    • By paddyandstumpy 20th Apr 17, 6:58 PM
    • 633 Posts
    • 222 Thanks
    paddyandstumpy
    • #7
    • 20th Apr 17, 6:58 PM
    • #7
    • 20th Apr 17, 6:58 PM
    Key facts, page 2, gradually operation causes are excluded.
    I bet a pound to a penny they'll use this to decline any claim for damp. It's a common market exclusion so don't expect it to be covered, even though they don't specify 'damp'.

    Also, the "make good" costs discussed above would usually be where there has been an escape of water and the insurer has paid for trace and access to source the leak.

    I'd be surprised if they even considered to cover the resultant damage from the damp or making any effected areas good again, fundamentally the issue has been caused by damp therefore excluded.
    • rs65
    • By rs65 20th Apr 17, 7:40 PM
    • 5,103 Posts
    • 2,428 Thanks
    rs65
    • #8
    • 20th Apr 17, 7:40 PM
    • #8
    • 20th Apr 17, 7:40 PM
    H
    I have read many articles about rising damp usually not being covered under insurance policies. However, having read our AA insurance police (link: https://www.theaa.com/insurance/pdf/buildings-insurance-policy-booklet-october-2015.pdf ) I can see no mention of damp at all.
    Originally posted by AgentJR
    Your policy tells you what you are covered for and it doesn't mention damp.
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