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    • applepad
    • By applepad 20th Apr 17, 12:09 PM
    • 317Posts
    • 797Thanks
    applepad
    Got my stove, what else do I need?
    • #1
    • 20th Apr 17, 12:09 PM
    Got my stove, what else do I need? 20th Apr 17 at 12:09 PM
    Fitting my multifuel stove next week, but what else do I need?

    Getting a log store and a builders bag of kiln dried wood on order.

    But do I need a companion set? Log basket? Log carrier? Coal bucket? Shovel and brush? Stove thermometer? Moisture meter?

    I will be burning smokeless coal and logs

    Thanks in advance
Page 1
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 20th Apr 17, 6:33 PM
    • 2,585 Posts
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    Ectophile
    • #2
    • 20th Apr 17, 6:33 PM
    • #2
    • 20th Apr 17, 6:33 PM
    Here are some things I can think of:-

    Something to carry and/or keep logs in. I just use an old holdall for carrying the logs, because it's easy to carry one handed, while the log basket needs two. The more logs you can keep indoors, or at least readily accessible, the better. You may find that you can't store enough logs in a basket.

    A companion set can be useful, and usually includes a small shovel and brush. But the most useful tool I have is an old toasting fork from a junk shop.

    You'll need kindling, and something to store it in. If you're buying smokeless fuel, you need something for that as well.

    You'll need something to put the ash into so you can carry it outside. I just use a plastic tub, once the ash is cool.

    A moisture meter is nice to have, but hardly essential. I don't have room on my flue pipe for a thermometer.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • firefox1956
    • By firefox1956 20th Apr 17, 8:09 PM
    • 1,048 Posts
    • 574 Thanks
    firefox1956
    • #3
    • 20th Apr 17, 8:09 PM
    • #3
    • 20th Apr 17, 8:09 PM
    Stove thermometer............
    Cheap enough here
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Magnetic-Heat-Powered-stove-Fan-Temperature-Gauge-Stove-Thermometer-/162286075348?hash=item25c900fdd4:g:xpoAAOSwTM5YwRo S
    • Greenfires
    • By Greenfires 21st Apr 17, 6:46 AM
    • 623 Posts
    • 534 Thanks
    Greenfires
    • #4
    • 21st Apr 17, 6:46 AM
    • #4
    • 21st Apr 17, 6:46 AM
    I wouldn't worry too much about any of those things. Some people get very paranoid about keeping the stove temp in the "ideal" section of the dial - where in practice the temp will rise and fall as the fuel is burned. When the fire is dying down a little, the temp will quite possibly fall into the dreaded "creosote zone" and you will start to panic. While there's no reason at all to do so as anything that will form creosote will have long since departed up the chimney. So buy one if you must - but don't be a slave to it.

    We carry logs in from the store in a "bag for life" - seems to hold just the right amount for an afternoon to bed time fire. Ash goes out in a tied up bread bag once it's cooled.

    I'd advise against burning smokeless and wood together, and suggest either or. They like completely opposite treatment in a stove - wood likes a bed of ash and the combustion air from above - smokeless likes a clean grate and air from below. Burn them together and you'll always be compromising one of them.

    Bear in mind that kiln dried will always be a fair chunk more expensive than naturally seasoned as it always tends to be flogged as some sort of super fuel. In reality, much of the time it's at a higher moisture content than decent air dried stuff - most dryers work to a 20% moisture content. Air dried in a decent year will be 16 - 17%. I'd never advise anyone to buy kd unless it was a last resort - buy seasoned or part seasoned early in the year - stick it in the store and let nature dry it. I see in the other thread you started you said you wouldn't buy kd logs but in this one you said you are doing?


    Don't know what sort of log store you've got - if it's a kit from ebay or somewhere it will probably hold about a weeks worth. A few pallets and a bit of roofing felt will give you a bigger and probably better built store for a lot less cash.
    Last edited by Greenfires; 21-04-2017 at 6:51 AM.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 21st Apr 17, 11:57 AM
    • 1,110 Posts
    • 1,631 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #5
    • 21st Apr 17, 11:57 AM
    • #5
    • 21st Apr 17, 11:57 AM
    You'll need something to put the ash into so you can carry it outside. I just use a plastic tub, once the ash is cool.
    Originally posted by Ectophile
    I used to use a plastic bucket for ash until I scooped some hot embers out. Melted the bottom of the bucket....

    Get a metal bucket - Much safer, and coal will generate quite a bit more ash than wood. If you have space, a fliptop ash tidy is a good idea.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • applepad
    • By applepad 21st Apr 17, 12:41 PM
    • 317 Posts
    • 797 Thanks
    applepad
    • #6
    • 21st Apr 17, 12:41 PM
    • #6
    • 21st Apr 17, 12:41 PM


    Don't know what sort of log store you've got - if it's a kit from ebay or somewhere it will probably hold about a weeks worth. A few pallets and a bit of roofing felt will give you a bigger and probably better built store for a lot less cash.
    Originally posted by Greenfires
    The log store holds 2 builders bags full, approx 1m3 bit worried now about how long this will last, will just be using on an evening approx 6 hours
    • A. Badger
    • By A. Badger 21st Apr 17, 1:51 PM
    • 5,079 Posts
    • 6,478 Thanks
    A. Badger
    • #7
    • 21st Apr 17, 1:51 PM
    • #7
    • 21st Apr 17, 1:51 PM
    I used to use a plastic bucket for ash until I scooped some hot embers out. Melted the bottom of the bucket....

    Get a metal bucket - Much safer, and coal will generate quite a bit more ash than wood. If you have space, a fliptop ash tidy is a good idea.
    Originally posted by FreeBear
    And get an original one from the people who invented it, made in Britain -- not one of the cheap Chinese copies!

    They are called Tippy and I've had two (different sized stoves). Lovely people to deal with too (and I'm a customer with no connection, obviously).

    http://www.tippyash.co.uk/
    • A. Badger
    • By A. Badger 21st Apr 17, 1:55 PM
    • 5,079 Posts
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    A. Badger
    • #8
    • 21st Apr 17, 1:55 PM
    • #8
    • 21st Apr 17, 1:55 PM
    [QUOTE=Greenfires;72432974]I wouldn't worry too much about any of those things. Some people get very paranoid about keeping the stove temp in the "ideal" section of the dial - where in practice the temp will rise and fall as the fuel is burned. When the fire is dying down a little, the temp will quite possibly fall into the dreaded "creosote zone" and you will start to panic. While there's no reason at all to do so as anything that will form creosote will have long since departed up the chimney. So buy one if you must - but don't be a slave to it.

    <snipped>

    I agree with almost everything Greenfires says there - especially about kiln dried logs and the supposed need for a thermometer. Here is a link to another site where they are less than convinced about thermometers. It makes interesting reading.

    http://woodheat.org/thermometers.html
    • J B
    • By J B 21st Apr 17, 2:07 PM
    • 2,186 Posts
    • 696 Thanks
    J B
    • #9
    • 21st Apr 17, 2:07 PM
    • #9
    • 21st Apr 17, 2:07 PM
    Don't you 'legally' have to have a CO alarm?
    • Livelongandprosper
    • By Livelongandprosper 21st Apr 17, 3:00 PM
    • 550 Posts
    • 1,598 Thanks
    Livelongandprosper
    A tippy tin is very useful, as is a poker and a brush and pan

    A carbon monoxide alarm is a must

    Toasting fork is a nice addition

    A fireguard is important of you have young children

    I use a cheap bamboo linen basket for the logs which has a liner so the spiders are contained

    We use a cheap vacuum to hoover the stove out now and then
    • applepad
    • By applepad 21st Apr 17, 4:07 PM
    • 317 Posts
    • 797 Thanks
    applepad
    Don't you 'legally' have to have a CO alarm?
    Originally posted by J B

    Already got one, plus the firm who are fitting my stove fit one too
    • michaelgordon
    • By michaelgordon 22nd Apr 17, 4:32 PM
    • 94 Posts
    • 18 Thanks
    michaelgordon
    coal bucket and a shovel to load the coal into fire. You could look at the fans i forget their name but the supposedly help the airflow, i have one but not sure it actually does anything.

    Depending on your stove size a builders bag wont last that long. My first year I had two builders bags and they lasted the winter mixed with 15 packs so about 150KG briquettes and was left with say a quarter left but i also had smokeless mainly used for weekend days when i needed the heat to last all day i had 50kg of that and most of it went.

    Im running a 5kw stove and that was heating just the front room.
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 22nd Apr 17, 11:29 PM
    • 2,585 Posts
    • 1,546 Thanks
    Ectophile
    The stove-top fans are really good if you have room on top of your stove to put one. They generate their own electricity from the heat, so no batteries or cords required.

    My stove is set into a fireplace, so I have no room for one.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • Livelongandprosper
    • By Livelongandprosper 23rd Apr 17, 8:32 AM
    • 550 Posts
    • 1,598 Thanks
    Livelongandprosper
    If you are burning smokeless then a good sized coal bunker is required

    I get my smokeless delivered, 5 large sacks at a time. I let the coal man and his lorry take the strain rather then the suspension of my car and my back. He just loads it into the bunker and sweeps up any mess

    The stove is lit from October to May most years. All day long from November to March so I burn mainly smokeless then, just using logs when I just need an evening fire. Smokeless and anthracite I find I can load to stove before I go to work and come home to a cosy home with the stove still lit
    • Parisno
    • By Parisno 24th Apr 17, 1:13 PM
    • 13 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Parisno
    I burn a mix of smokeless and wood (Usually Briquettes of the Pini Kay variety)

    Fan - Got one, the wife likes it but not sure it does much
    Poker - Heavy Iron one, essential
    Thermometer - Got one but dont pay too much attention, depending where I put it the readings vary wildly, its fairly easy to tell if your stove is hot or not, and temp rises when new fuel is added and falls off as it burns.
    Moisture meter - Got one (somewhere), used it once I think and probably did it wrong!
    Log basket - Got one, a strong wicker basket from Dunelm, not a log basket but ideal for me, a rubble sack from the local supermarket is an ideal fit and keeps the bits from falling all over and only a quid for a roll of them.
    Brush and steel shovel - Essential if you are burning coal and for cleaning bits up

    GREENFIRES - If you read this, you seem to know what you are talking about, where would you put a stove thermometer and what would be an "ideal" temp?
    Last edited by Parisno; 24-04-2017 at 1:16 PM. Reason: Question
    • vanilla8
    • By vanilla8 25th Apr 17, 7:48 PM
    • 609 Posts
    • 414 Thanks
    vanilla8
    I got a wood holder and coal bucket from Home Bargains.
    Got my poker from amazon.
    Haven't found a suitable dustpan and brush that sits right next to it all, but mainly doing my cleaning when ash cold so using plastic one at the moment.
    • Cash-Cows
    • By Cash-Cows 2nd May 17, 4:36 PM
    • 149 Posts
    • 110 Thanks
    Cash-Cows
    The best accessory I have are the heat resistant gloves. They were free with the stove. Easy to open the door rather than using the clip on handle and the safest way to place a log.
    • Cash-Cows
    • By Cash-Cows 2nd May 17, 4:37 PM
    • 149 Posts
    • 110 Thanks
    Cash-Cows
    You can add accessories to your Christmas list. No point in buying the nice to have items.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 2nd May 17, 7:11 PM
    • 1,193 Posts
    • 1,039 Thanks
    EachPenny
    Dusters. If you don't already have a real fire you'll discover a new need to dust regularly, even with a sealed door on the stove

    I would also consider purchasing a spare ash pan for the stove, subject to cost. It is much safer and easier to take the hot one out and replace it with the spare - allowing the hot one to cool down before moving it away from the hearth (if the layout of your hearth permits).

    You'll want to take the ash pan outside to empty to minimise dust in the house - beware of opening the outside door while carrying an uncovered ash pan on anything but a perfectly calm day. Don't be tempted to empty the ash pan in sheds or outbuildings, especially ones containing tools or bicycles. Ash, especially from smokeless fuel, is highly corrosive when mixed with moisture. My dad managed to ruin the chrome on my treasured Raleigh bike that way.

    After you've been using the stove for a while and are sure you are happy with it, another thing to consider is getting a spare set of firebricks/linings and possibly door glass (if applicable to your stove). These don't last forever and you don't want to be in a position where the manufaturer discontinues them as a spare part just before you need replacements. You'll need to get a competent person to fit them, but having the parts already is an insurance against future non-availability. The grate is another part which may not last a lifetime - but this (and the firebricks/lining), will last longer if you avoid throwing logs into the stove and place them in gently using tongs.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • A. Badger
    • By A. Badger 2nd May 17, 9:34 PM
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    A. Badger
    To follow EachPenny's comment, these problems of hot ash pans and so on are precisely what the 'Tippy', referred to earlier, solves. You put the entire pan inside the Tippy, empty the hot ash into it and then close the lid - minimal dust, no fire risk.
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