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  • FIRST POST
    • JonnyH649
    • By JonnyH649 19th Apr 17, 10:17 PM
    • 1Posts
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    JonnyH649
    Bathroom Paint. Is it worth it??
    • #1
    • 19th Apr 17, 10:17 PM
    Bathroom Paint. Is it worth it?? 19th Apr 17 at 10:17 PM
    Hi,

    Me and the wife are looking to give our bathroom a new lick of paint to modernise it a little,

    We were wondering if it is worth paying the extra for the bathroom specific paint which boasts anti-mould technology and is able to withstand steam and moisture.

    can anybody confirm wether it is worth it or not or can we stick with a basic paint.

    Thanks in advance.
Page 1
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 19th Apr 17, 10:27 PM
    • 4,525 Posts
    • 19,107 Thanks
    Slinky
    • #2
    • 19th Apr 17, 10:27 PM
    • #2
    • 19th Apr 17, 10:27 PM
    We've only ever used ordinary vinyl silk (Dulux) in our bathrooms and have never had problems. However we do have proper extraction above the showers, the house is well heated, and the bathroom windows are opened regularly to air the room. I can imagine it would be easy to get mould with poor ventilation in a colder house.
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 20th Apr 17, 12:45 AM
    • 2,689 Posts
    • 1,512 Thanks
    TheCyclingProgrammer
    • #3
    • 20th Apr 17, 12:45 AM
    • #3
    • 20th Apr 17, 12:45 AM
    A normal eggshell paint will be just as good. If you ventilate the room properly you won't need to worry about mould.
    • ancientofdays
    • By ancientofdays 20th Apr 17, 6:34 AM
    • 1,182 Posts
    • 13,167 Thanks
    ancientofdays
    • #4
    • 20th Apr 17, 6:34 AM
    • #4
    • 20th Apr 17, 6:34 AM
    I used this in a well-ventilated shower room. Despite extensive and very careful preparation, the paint started to crack and flake. I hoped that this would make it easy to remove for repainting but it was awful to get off, and really hard to get the walls back into a decent condition for redecorating so I will never use it again.
    I was jumping to conclusions and one of them jumped back
    • SavingEnthu
    • By SavingEnthu 20th Apr 17, 1:41 PM
    • 17 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    SavingEnthu
    • #5
    • 20th Apr 17, 1:41 PM
    • #5
    • 20th Apr 17, 1:41 PM
    Have just redone my bathroom ceiling.. had to scrape off quite a bit back to the plasterboard underneath... I then applied 2 coats of Zinsser 123 Bullseye primer....... and so far have only applied 1 coat of the Dulux Bathroom Pure Brilliant White Soft Sheen..

    I guess it depends on how much you are comfortable spending and give yourself the best shot of hopefully doing the job well enough with good quality stuff and hopefully not having to revisit the job again cos of skimping on it the first time... (well, thats my view anyway)

    Being a novice DIY'er without any significant experience, I just went with the specialist products out there and cross my fingers it holds up for a couple of years at least.

    Good luck
    • ST1991
    • By ST1991 20th Apr 17, 1:48 PM
    • 397 Posts
    • 220 Thanks
    ST1991
    • #6
    • 20th Apr 17, 1:48 PM
    • #6
    • 20th Apr 17, 1:48 PM
    Depends how 'steamy' your bathroom gets. Ours is quite small and even with the window open it stays pretty steamy during the shower. We'll be putting an extractor fan into it in due course!

    Bathroom paint isn't necessarily that much more than normal paint (we used wilkos own, and its great) for the walls. We did use a dulux anti-mould paint for the ceiling which was more expensive.
    What i would say is that the anti-mould paints have specific instructions. Bleaching and preparing the surfaces first, hours between coats and allowing to dry for 24 hours before exposing to any steam or condensation. So how well they work depends on how well you apply them i guess!
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 20th Apr 17, 2:38 PM
    • 1,203 Posts
    • 1,121 Thanks
    Grenage
    • #7
    • 20th Apr 17, 2:38 PM
    • #7
    • 20th Apr 17, 2:38 PM
    I've used Zinsser Permawhite silk before, and it was an excellent, hard-wearing paint. Most of the bathroom paints will give anti-mould guarantees for mould developing in the paint - but not on the paint.

    In a room more prone to mould, I would pay the extra. Our new bathroom is much bigger, so I won't bother.
    • Horseygirl123
    • By Horseygirl123 20th Apr 17, 4:23 PM
    • 299 Posts
    • 404 Thanks
    Horseygirl123
    • #8
    • 20th Apr 17, 4:23 PM
    • #8
    • 20th Apr 17, 4:23 PM
    The builder next door used masonry paint that he was given. The bathroom is small and he said there are no problems.
    • Annie1960
    • By Annie1960 20th Apr 17, 5:00 PM
    • 2,669 Posts
    • 1,492 Thanks
    Annie1960
    • #9
    • 20th Apr 17, 5:00 PM
    • #9
    • 20th Apr 17, 5:00 PM
    I used Dulux bathroom paint in my last bathroom. It was painted in 2007 and I moved out 8 yeaars later and it still looked good.

    I plan to use the same paint in my shower room and my current bathroom.
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 20th Apr 17, 5:33 PM
    • 2,689 Posts
    • 1,512 Thanks
    TheCyclingProgrammer
    I've used Zinsser Permawhite silk before, and it was an excellent, hard-wearing paint. Most of the bathroom paints will give anti-mould guarantees for mould developing in the paint - but not on the paint.

    In a room more prone to mould, I would pay the extra. Our new bathroom is much bigger, so I won't bother.
    Originally posted by Grenage
    +1 to Zinsser Permawhite. We used it in a shower room which is ventilated but still gets some steam and condensation. Not a single spot of mould on the ceiling. Our local decorator place let us take it home to paint the ceiling then bring back the tin to have it tinted using a Dulux colour for the walls.
    • Niv
    • By Niv 21st Apr 17, 9:28 AM
    • 1,517 Posts
    • 1,326 Thanks
    Niv
    I used regular matt in my last bathroom, not a spot of mould after 11years of use!
    YNWA

    Mortgage free by 58.
    • Corona
    • By Corona 21st Apr 17, 1:44 PM
    • 820 Posts
    • 729 Thanks
    Corona
    I've always used specific bathroom/kitchen paint in those rooms but I now believe that ventilation in the room is far more important. We have problems with our kitchen - we're waiting to put in a new kitchen with a proper extractor fan but, for now, we're dependent on opening windows and a dehumidifier. Consequently, it's a constant battle with mould, despite using kitchen paint. However, I suppose it's possible that, without the anti-mould paint, it would be even worse??
    • phill99
    • By phill99 21st Apr 17, 4:06 PM
    • 7,958 Posts
    • 7,191 Thanks
    phill99
    There is no such thing as Kitchen and Bathroom paint. It is silk emulsion that has been rebranded. It is only sold into the retail market and is never used by professionals and never specified by architects or designers.


    A good silk emulsion is all that you need. A good egg shell, as noted above will also do the trick.
    Eat vegetables and fear no creditors, rather than eat duck and hide.
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