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  • FIRST POST
    • BBH123
    • By BBH123 19th Apr 17, 7:53 PM
    • 367Posts
    • 497Thanks
    BBH123
    I'm so worn out not being able to beat my eating issues
    • #1
    • 19th Apr 17, 7:53 PM
    I'm so worn out not being able to beat my eating issues 19th Apr 17 at 7:53 PM
    I don't have a healthy relationship with food at all.

    I have been slim all my life but then I hit my forties , left a stressful career for a better quality of life but now have food issues that have crept up .

    I'm sure I'm addicted to junk and seem to be caught in an awful cycle of binge eating , I can't have one biscuit I have to eat the packet type thing. I can't buy a small bar of chocolate I have to buy family size and scoff the lot .

    I'm not surf there are any answers but if anyone else recognises this and has found an answer I'd like to hear.

    I want some control back .
Page 1
    • IAmWales
    • By IAmWales 19th Apr 17, 8:02 PM
    • 983 Posts
    • 2,148 Thanks
    IAmWales
    • #2
    • 19th Apr 17, 8:02 PM
    • #2
    • 19th Apr 17, 8:02 PM
    Stop having the food in the house. You can't eat it if it's not there. Make healthy choices, fill the cupboards/ fridge full of fruit instead.

    (I used to do the same. The only answer for me was to remove temptation.)
    • fireblade28
    • By fireblade28 19th Apr 17, 10:38 PM
    • 142 Posts
    • 104 Thanks
    fireblade28
    • #3
    • 19th Apr 17, 10:38 PM
    • #3
    • 19th Apr 17, 10:38 PM
    I second the not buying it thing.

    I just don't buy unhealthy stuff.

    You can't expect yourself to control when you are tired and hungry you simply won't do it. If you only buy good stuff that's all you will be able to eat and you will get used to it.

    If people leave stuff at my house now I literally just bin it. I know it's a waste but it's better than me eating it. I have binned whole chocolate bars and bottles of coke.

    The other thing to consider if it's an issue is professional help.
    • DBlenks90
    • By DBlenks90 20th Apr 17, 6:52 AM
    • 13 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    DBlenks90
    • #4
    • 20th Apr 17, 6:52 AM
    • #4
    • 20th Apr 17, 6:52 AM
    I'm going to jump on a say the same. I find that if there's less food in the house, I'm less tempted to eat.

    Also, a little bit of insight from my experience: It's like climbing a mountain. It's hard going up, but once you're there, its all downhill.

    Your body gets used to the junk and even craves it. Once you break that cycle of "eat junk/crave junk" it gets MUCH easier. Usually it takes a few weeks for me.

    That being said, people are doing fasting diets these days which aim to do the same thing. My parents are doing it and its working great for them. Basically it allows your body that reset time by condensing your eating into 8 hrs per day.

    Hope that helps!
    Last edited by DBlenks90; 20-04-2017 at 6:53 AM. Reason: adding clarification
    • Ilona
    • By Ilona 20th Apr 17, 9:02 AM
    • 1,856 Posts
    • 6,412 Thanks
    Ilona
    • #5
    • 20th Apr 17, 9:02 AM
    • #5
    • 20th Apr 17, 9:02 AM
    I don't have a healthy relationship with food at all.

    I'm sure I'm addicted to junk and seem to be caught in an awful cycle of binge eating , I can't have one biscuit I have to eat the packet type thing. I can't buy a small bar of chocolate I have to buy family size and scoff the lot .

    I'm not surf there are any answers but if anyone else recognises this and has found an answer I'd like to hear.

    I want some control back .
    Originally posted by BBH123
    Yes, I have found the answer. I used to be an absolute pig where sweets, cake, biscuits, crisps, and chocolate were concerned.

    Following on from my logical thinking of if I don't spend money then I don't have to earn it, it follows that if I don't buy any cr ap then I don't have to eat it. So, as the others say, don't buy it.

    All this junk that you can't resist is not actually food, it provides no useful sustenance to the body whatsoever. It is scoffing purely for the mind, I will eat it because it makes me feel better. Yes, for the time it is in the mouth perhaps, but afterwards it brings nothing but misery as the inches pile on and the addiction to sugar becomes the focus of your life.

    I miss out whole aisles in the supermarket, I don't go down them because I don't want to put temptation in my face. I say to myself, no I don't need a cake, don't need biscuits.

    I don't say I never eat them, but I keep them as treats, to be enjoyed once in a while. I am partial to a Magnun ice cream now and again, but I only buy one when I am on a day out. I could buy a box of three at the supermarket a lot cheaper but I don't because I know I would pig out on them and eat the lot.

    If you feel the urge to buy junk in a shop, walk out again. Be tough with yourself, say, no, not today. If you keep doing this, and it's hard at first, you will find that the gaps between giving in will get longer and longer. Try it.

    Ilona
    I love skip diving
    • BBH123
    • By BBH123 20th Apr 17, 9:32 AM
    • 367 Posts
    • 497 Thanks
    BBH123
    • #6
    • 20th Apr 17, 9:32 AM
    • #6
    • 20th Apr 17, 9:32 AM
    Thanks for your thoughts everyone .

    As far as don't buy it you'd think I was a health junkie if you saw my supermarket trolley , it's all healthy , however I buy my junk at the local garage . I will drive to buy my 'fix'

    I can really relate to what Ilona says in that if I buy the supermarket offers ie 4 mars for a pound I won't have one a day I'll scoff the lot.

    I have tried leaving my wallet at home so I can't buy but then I feel vulnerable if the car breaks down for example.

    I try tactics like filling up my car to the brim because I was finding putting a tenner in every other day was taking me to the tempting garage too often.

    I have stopped using the sandwich lady at work because she sells goodies aswell.

    I think food addiction is hard because unlike drugs or alcohol you cannot totally stop taking it, you have to eat to live .

    I will keep trying , it makes me feel so stupid because I can control most other things, I do have an addictive personality though, I am also a recovering magazine junkie lol I was spending £80 a month which was silly so now I put my favourites on much cheaper subscriptions and shop in a supermarket with a very limited selection of them.
    • Ilona
    • By Ilona 20th Apr 17, 12:07 PM
    • 1,856 Posts
    • 6,412 Thanks
    Ilona
    • #7
    • 20th Apr 17, 12:07 PM
    • #7
    • 20th Apr 17, 12:07 PM
    Yes, it is hard to resist when it is forever in your face. I too fill my car up to the brim, it will last me for 5 or 6 weeks, don't do many miles.

    The feeling vulnerable without the cushion of money is common. If you are mainly pessimistic you will always be worrying about what might happen, when in reality the chances are that nothing will happen, unless you are running about in a banger. Do you have breakdown cover?

    Yes, you have to eat to live, but what you need to remember is that by eating junk food, cr ap if you like, will probably shorten your life. I would like to live for another 20 or 30 years, 68 now, and I know I have to look after my health to achieve that.

    Apply the same principle to buying junk as to spending money on anything. Ask yourself, do I need it or do I want it. It will be a long hard slog, but if you can take little steps now, eventually it should get easier.

    Have a look at the rest of your life, are you using food as a crutch, are you worrying about something that is not quite right, does eating junk comfort you? Try distraction, make some plans to do something that will take you away from your comfort zone. Only by facing up to this will you beat it. Good luck.
    Ilona
    I love skip diving
    • tensandunits
    • By tensandunits 20th Apr 17, 12:30 PM
    • 814 Posts
    • 1,220 Thanks
    tensandunits
    • #8
    • 20th Apr 17, 12:30 PM
    • #8
    • 20th Apr 17, 12:30 PM
    Without going too much into cod psychology, what is it that you're craving when you're longing to eat these highly processed sugary foods? The body does not need that amount of sugar or energy, so the eating must be emotional/psychological.
    • Anoneemoose
    • By Anoneemoose 20th Apr 17, 1:30 PM
    • 1,705 Posts
    • 2,095 Thanks
    Anoneemoose
    • #9
    • 20th Apr 17, 1:30 PM
    • #9
    • 20th Apr 17, 1:30 PM
    You would probably benefit from counselling of some sort. For all the advice is well meaning, if you have BED, it isn't just as easy to not buy it, because when you're in binge mode, you'll stop at nothing to get food.

    I had bulimia and BED and found help though a combination of CBT and counselling with the lady whose website this is:


    http://peacefuleating.co.uk

    She also has a friendly, understanding FB group called 'It's not about the weight'.

    I can honestly say my life has changed.x
    • xbrenx
    • By xbrenx 20th Apr 17, 10:54 PM
    • 886 Posts
    • 783 Thanks
    xbrenx
    Thanks for your thoughts everyone.

    I think food addiction is hard because unlike drugs or alcohol you cannot totally stop taking it, you have to eat to live.
    Originally posted by BBH123
    You have to eat healthily to live
    The sugar is a craving that you can live without, you just have to convince yourself of that.

    I know it's not easy. I am a complete chocoholic and once said, the only thing that would make me stop eating it is if it was poisonous. Now I have diabetes - hahaha - it really is poisonous stuff!

    I hope you find your answers

    • theoretica
    • By theoretica 20th Apr 17, 11:41 PM
    • 4,804 Posts
    • 6,035 Thanks
    theoretica
    Be sure you have in stock enough food you like and don't feel bad about eating. It is much easier to think positively (I will eat more raspberries) than just negatively (no biscuits).
    But a banker, engaged at enormous expense,
    Had the whole of their cash in his care.
    Lewis Carroll
    • ibizafan
    • By ibizafan 21st Apr 17, 9:41 AM
    • 632 Posts
    • 752 Thanks
    ibizafan
    I have been exactly like you and can still slip back at weak moments, e.g. Easter brought on a chocfest. Like others, I never buy food I would be tempted to binge on, such as biscuits, crisps etc. Petrol stations can be a problem, so if tempted, I just remind myself that I will be so annoyed with myself if I give in and that usually works. I do the 5:2 diet permanently now (holidays aside) and have got pretty disciplined with it, but weekends I do relax and buy the odd cake, although not chocolate very often. A weekend treat works for me, and doesn't seem to interfere with keeping the weight off in the long run.
    • JEN22
    • By JEN22 21st Apr 17, 3:25 PM
    • 311 Posts
    • 52 Thanks
    JEN22
    I think I could help . I have suffered binge eating and anorexia for 20 years on and off I am now in remission. I did Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and its magic.


    Contact BEAT or a CBT consellor. You wont beat this illness without help. Trust me
    • UKTigerlily
    • By UKTigerlily 21st Apr 17, 11:49 PM
    • 4,283 Posts
    • 5,296 Thanks
    UKTigerlily
    Alcohol you can totally stop . . I get it you mean you can stop alcohol but need food to live, but the way I see it is that alcohol is a drink and you need to drink to live, you just have to cut alcohol . . . so when people say but you need food to live, sure, but you don't need junk food to live

    I'd have one thing per day as a treat, so you're not totally giving it all up. Is there another garage you can fill the car at? I do 5 good days then two not great, as I have to have some to cope, and it works for me.
    2015 weight loss: 86/100Ibs
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 22nd Apr 17, 7:54 AM
    • 15,713 Posts
    • 39,329 Thanks
    FBaby
    Your body gets used to the junk and even craves it. Once you break that cycle of "eat junk/crave junk" it gets MUCH easier. Usually it takes a few weeks for me.
    Totally agree with this. Sugar IS incredibly addictive mentally and has a way of making you think that your craving is hunger when it isn't at all! I have a very sweet tooth, always have, so beating the craving has always part of my life. Like you, I find the first week hard as I feel like I am starving if I don't have my sugar fix, but it's amazing how this disappear after about 3 weeks and I can go from being obsessed with the cakes sitting in the office kitchen call me to eat them, to standing there whilst the kettle boils, staring at them and thinking that I really don't want them.

    I can really relate to what Ilona says in that if I buy the supermarket offers ie 4 mars for a pound I won't have one a day I'll scoff the lot.
    So you do buy rubbish food at the supermarket. This definitely need to stop, offer or not. As for the stopping at the garage, could you only stop at those where you can pay at the pump so you avoid going in, standing in the queue tantalised by all the colourful treats.

    Also, there are few tricks to fight it. Mine is sugar free lollies. They don't taste fantastic, but they help with the evening desperate cravings. It takes 10 minutes or so to go through one rather than less than 1 for a chocolate bar, and they have no calories. It does it for me until I reach that point when the craving is sorted.

    I'm back at it again, once again it creeped in slowly, with a number of afternoon invites at friends who bake cakes for the occasion, so you can't really say no, birthdays at work, and of course the latest, Easter. I made it clear I didn't want any eggs, but once again, it fell on death ears. They are now in the bin. So 4 days in and already starting to feel a bit better. By end of next week, I should be able to look at a treat and not feel like I am being mentally tortured by not picking one up!
    • BBH123
    • By BBH123 22nd Apr 17, 5:25 PM
    • 367 Posts
    • 497 Thanks
    BBH123
    Thanks again everyone there are some great tips there, I like the idea of the sugar free lollies.

    Today I have planned myself to try again , I have filled the car with petrol so I don't need to go into the garage.

    I have been to the supermarket and bought healthy food, no junk. I did buy some sugar free jellies with raspberries deserts to stave off the cravings .

    Lastly I have put my wallet into the barn out of the way so next week I will make my own lunch and avoid the sandwich lady .

    I have to say I feel silly not being able to control this , I mean it's simple right , don't eat chocolate .
    • Pop Up Pirate
    • By Pop Up Pirate 23rd Apr 17, 7:20 AM
    • 683 Posts
    • 1,817 Thanks
    Pop Up Pirate
    Thanks again everyone there are some great tips there, I like the idea of the sugar free lollies.

    Today I have planned myself to try again , I have filled the car with petrol so I don't need to go into the garage.

    I have been to the supermarket and bought healthy food, no junk. I did buy some sugar free jellies with raspberries deserts to stave off the cravings .

    Lastly I have put my wallet into the barn out of the way so next week I will make my own lunch and avoid the sandwich lady .

    I have to say I feel silly not being able to control this , I mean it's simple right , don't eat chocolate .
    Originally posted by BBH123
    Actually, it's not about the chocolate as chocolate in the right form is good for you.

    People binge and crave mainly because their bodies are not receiving the right nutrients to begin with and it's a complex issue.
    The more your body is deprived, the more harm to the brain, the more anxiety/depression, the more binging and craving, the more eating, the worse things get.

    Start out by healing yourself. Find a very good quality omega 3 supplement (try to get it in triglyceride form), This is essential to brain health and is missing from our Western diets.
    Also get some vitamin D (with K2) and in as near natural form as possible. Try to avoid synthetic vitamins.

    Then, eat more healthy fat. Butter, lard, coconut oil, olive oil etc. Fat does not make us fat. Carbs do. The body needs fat to work properly, especially the brain. Fat keeps cravings at bay and also helps you to stay feeling full.

    Once you have those basics down, increase the healthy foods. Fresh veggies, good quality meats and fish, some fruit, nuts, seeds etc Probiotic yoghurts would be a good idea too.
    Try to avoid processed foods, manufactured cooking oil (watch labels on olive oil as so many olive oils now have cooking oils added to them!! Why??? Who the hell knows??)
    and soy products.

    You will probably find that you will naturally give up sugary foods and will limit carbs and weight will fall.
    It might not fall very fast, but you will know you are very healthy in the process.
    • DBlenks90
    • By DBlenks90 23rd Apr 17, 10:50 AM
    • 13 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    DBlenks90
    Be sure you have in stock enough food you like and don't feel bad about eating. It is much easier to think positively (I will eat more raspberries) than just negatively (no biscuits).
    Originally posted by theoretica

    Good point. I think the better way to approach it is to stock the right things in your house. Try to buy fresh stuff that goes bad, like vegetables, fruits, etc.

    I find if I stick to foods that go bad, I'm probably eating healthier overall.
    • Judi
    • By Judi 23rd Apr 17, 11:00 AM
    • 14,925 Posts
    • 60,394 Thanks
    Judi
    The only way for me is to remove temptation too. Thats why i am still overweight. If i had to shop for myself it wouldnt be such a problem.
    'Holy crap on a cracker!'
    • professor~yaffle
    • By professor~yaffle 23rd Apr 17, 11:45 AM
    • 477 Posts
    • 713 Thanks
    professor~yaffle
    Davina McCall did a book called 5 weeks to sugar free. Might be worth a look? She managed to cut out sugar, and said it was the hardest thing she'd ever had to give up. (Which, given her history is saying something!) Sugar really is addictive.
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