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    • Pablocity
    • By Pablocity 19th Apr 17, 10:27 AM
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    Pablocity
    Solicitors Costs
    • #1
    • 19th Apr 17, 10:27 AM
    Solicitors Costs 19th Apr 17 at 10:27 AM
    Hello. I am trying to find a solicitor to work for me. I have spoken to a couple of solicitors, but don't really trust them. I don't understand their cost. Can anybody give me a steer on no-win no fee agreements.
Page 1
    • Browntoa
    • By Browntoa 19th Apr 17, 10:29 AM
    • 31,864 Posts
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    Browntoa
    • #2
    • 19th Apr 17, 10:29 AM
    • #2
    • 19th Apr 17, 10:29 AM
    solicitor for what type of claim....there are specialists but we need to know which one to point you at
    I'm the Board Guide of the Referrers ,Telephones, Pensions , Shop Don't drop ,over 50's and Discount Code boards which means I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum runnning smoothly .However, please remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    • bris
    • By bris 19th Apr 17, 12:33 PM
    • 7,029 Posts
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    bris
    • #3
    • 19th Apr 17, 12:33 PM
    • #3
    • 19th Apr 17, 12:33 PM
    Solicitors don't work for no win no fee.


    There are a few who do personal injury claims that are well advertised but they won't touch you unless the are guaranteed 100% win. They are not stupid, they know when they meet you whether you have a case or not, the slightest doubt and forget it.


    You post is also very vague, what is your claim, if it's not personal injury you won't find a no win no fee solicitor so you need to spend big money, which you get back if you win (if they can pay).


    If however it's within the small claims court £10000 maximum then go down that route your self.
    • macman
    • By macman 19th Apr 17, 6:29 PM
    • 41,344 Posts
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    macman
    • #4
    • 19th Apr 17, 6:29 PM
    • #4
    • 19th Apr 17, 6:29 PM
    They charge on a hourly rate, and the rate will be given to you in writing before any work is carried out. The rate depends on the area and the work required.
    Oh and don't forget the extra for 'various disbursements', which is always my favourite.
    If you don't trust them, you can always do the work yourself, depending on what is required.
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
    • steampowered
    • By steampowered 19th Apr 17, 6:41 PM
    • 1,889 Posts
    • 1,768 Thanks
    steampowered
    • #5
    • 19th Apr 17, 6:41 PM
    • #5
    • 19th Apr 17, 6:41 PM
    Whether no-win no-fee is an option depends entirely on the nature of your case.

    Before taking you on under a NWNF agreement, your solicitor would have to review the case and decide that the prospects of success are very good.
    • Undervalued
    • By Undervalued 20th Apr 17, 11:25 AM
    • 3,177 Posts
    • 2,892 Thanks
    Undervalued
    • #6
    • 20th Apr 17, 11:25 AM
    • #6
    • 20th Apr 17, 11:25 AM
    Solicitors don't work for no win no fee.


    There are a few who do personal injury claims that are well advertised but they won't touch you unless the are guaranteed 100% win. They are not stupid, they know when they meet you whether you have a case or not, the slightest doubt and forget it.


    You post is also very vague, what is your claim, if it's not personal injury you won't find a no win no fee solicitor so you need to spend big money, which you get back if you win (if they can pay).


    If however it's within the small claims court £10000 maximum then go down that route your self.
    Originally posted by bris
    That is not necessarily true. In addition to personal injury (which you mention) quite a number of other claim may be considered. Employment and even libel claims are a couple of examples.

    That said you do need to fully understand any agreement before signing. Although you should be protected if you lose, it is sometime possible to "win" your case but end up well out of pocket.
    • unholyangel
    • By unholyangel 20th Apr 17, 12:57 PM
    • 11,531 Posts
    • 8,666 Thanks
    unholyangel
    • #7
    • 20th Apr 17, 12:57 PM
    • #7
    • 20th Apr 17, 12:57 PM
    The way these generally work is the solicitor take out insurance to cover their costs & the other sides costs in the event you lose. In the event you win, their costs will be a maximum of 25% of your award.

    They can have loopholes in the T&C's which allow them to pass on their costs/the other sides costs in certain circumstances though so always wise to read the fine print.

    That being said, with their costs limited to 25% of your award and success rate influencing insurance, you're likely to only get this type of funding if your case has a reasonable chance of success and the award will be high enough to recoup their costs.
    Money doesn't solve poverty.....it creates it.
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