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    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 18th Apr 17, 8:14 PM
    • 22,574Posts
    • 86,290Thanks
    Jojo the Tightfisted
    Insomnia
    • #1
    • 18th Apr 17, 8:14 PM
    Insomnia 18th Apr 17 at 8:14 PM
    It's been another three weeks since I last really moaned about my lot online.

    Still off work, but have a specialist appointment in the morning (sparrowfart o'clock), so travelling in rush hour, buses, trains, the lot.

    Anyhow, I'm still not sleeping more than a couple of hours every couple of days, usually between 7 and 9am. Whilst some here might find that acceptable or normal for them, I've sort of functioned - I managed to run a bath and have it without drowning, put clothes on the right way round (which isn't guaranteed 100% successful even with full sleep ), done a bit of watering in the garden & chuck some wildflower seeds down on a bare patch, make a couple of cups of tea, that kind of thing - oh, and realise the boiler had lost pressure, so topped it up.

    Unfortunately, it didn't quite register with me that I'd overfilled it a bit. Until it started banging like a bag of spanners in a washing machine. Nonetheless, I managed to explain to OH that it just needed the extra pressure releasing by bleeding off some water from the radiator. And what bleeding meant. And what to undo to bleed it. And what to use to undo it. And where to find it. And to provide cloths when he found out that releasing liquid under pressure means it spurts out rather than trickling. But the floor looks a lot cleaner now, so it's still a win in my book.


    If I go to sleep now, I'll be awake by 9.30 and still be awake all night. But I've just knocked over my cup and I'm correcting typos every couple of characters. I'm flagging. Not yawning -
    probably looking a bit glazed and wide eyed, though.



    Anyhow, my main moan was that I went back to the GP today. Very nice lady. However, after waiting an hour and a half past my appointment time to see her, all she could suggest was starting a course of antidepressants. Now, I'll concede that being ill, work, etc, is stressful, but stress =/= depression. And I learned from bitter experience when treated off licence with the things for pain several years ago that taking them when I'm not depressed and for something else they haven't been scientifically proven to have a positive effect upon patient outcomes, is a surefire way to get me going somewhat loopy. Batshit loopy, to be precise. So I very politely declined and explained and left without any concrete help, just a sympathetic smile from her. [Because prescribing a couple of days of something that has been proven clinically to actually work isn't apparently acceptable in modern medicine, as, according to NHS protocols, the only people who want something that works are going to sell it on the black market or become shambling addicts for years on end]


    And then, to add insult to injury, the OH has disappeared off upstairs and is obviously having a little nap. That is, he's snoring his head off. Having not got up until just before 11.30am and having slept like a rootling pig since midnight the night before.



    Yes, yes, whinge, whinge, whinge. I need to sleep, but I need to not sleep quite now. And I need to wake up at stupid o'clock. When I'm consistently still awake at stupid bloody o'clock at present.


    The moral of this story? It's possible to stay awake for 47 hours straight with nothing more than camomile tea over the laminate and the noisiest combination boiler in the known universe to show for it. And don't whatever you do, when confronted with a spouse who is in that state, sneak off upstairs 'to put some socks on' but get into bed, close your eyes and recommence the rumbling noises that have accompanied almost all their multitudinous waking hours for the last month and a half.


    Oh, and stay away from Amazon in that state. Otherwise, chest freezers and woodchippers start to appeal to you.



    Only about an hour or so to go. Keep going. Keep going..
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
Page 2
    • Mandelbrot
    • By Mandelbrot 20th Apr 17, 4:09 PM
    • 8,641 Posts
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    Mandelbrot
    Your doctor will know what is best for you.
    Originally posted by tensandunits
    Yeah, right ...

    medical professionals, while not perfect, will be acting in your best interests.
    Yeah, right ...
    • tensandunits
    • By tensandunits 20th Apr 17, 5:01 PM
    • 814 Posts
    • 1,219 Thanks
    tensandunits
    Yeah, right ...


    Yeah, right ...
    Originally posted by Mandelbrot
    Well, I'm not about to have another conversation about sleep with somebody who claims to need less than 2 hours a night.
    • tensandunits
    • By tensandunits 20th Apr 17, 5:03 PM
    • 814 Posts
    • 1,219 Thanks
    tensandunits
    If I were to complete the standard mood questionnaire (again), it would make it fairly clear I'm not depressed - and the adverse reaction to off licence antidepressants I had the first time completely contrandicates the prescription of such again, in any case. NHS guidelines also state that it's an inappropriate prescription unless you have depression, due to lack of information regarding efficacy and the side effects - it's included in a list with alternative therapies.

    It's interesting that the NHS site contradicts the doctor's view of what they are supposed to do; it describes quite clearly that a short term prescription of something designed for the condition is appropriate (particularly as all the good sleep practices aren't working).



    Did remarkably well with sleeping this time. 4.30am to 9. Just as well I'm not at work, isn't it?
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    The NHS site can only give general guidance, it can't diagnose you and it doesn't know your medical history. Always go by your doctor. The GP must have had reason to suggest the anti-depressants (though you obvs don't need to go into detail on here). Well done on managing to sleep a bit, anyway.
    • Tipsntreats
    • By Tipsntreats 20th Apr 17, 5:46 PM
    • 7,894 Posts
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    Tipsntreats
    Sorry for taking so long to get back to you Jojo. As promissed.
    www.psychologytoday.com/blog/cutting-edge-leadership/201704/8-easy-strategies-combat-insomnia
    Money, money, money
    Must be funny
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 20th Apr 17, 8:25 PM
    • 22,574 Posts
    • 86,290 Thanks
    Jojo the Tightfisted
    The NHS site can only give general guidance, it can't diagnose you and it doesn't know your medical history. Always go by your doctor. The GP must have had reason to suggest the anti-depressants (though you obvs don't need to go into detail on here). Well done on managing to sleep a bit, anyway.
    Originally posted by tensandunits

    Yes, she did. As an old antidepressant, they have a side effect of causing sedation and has a long half life, which must be useful for some who have anxiety and depression and tend to wake up very early, as it keeps them sleepy for a prolonged period. It's one of the reasons why it was superseded by newer types of antidepressant drugs many years ago. Well, that and the other side effects, including an increased risk of suicide, strong withdrawals, sexual dysfunction and hormonal disruption.

    But as she said 'we don't prescribe sleeping tablets', I'm thinking it was more a perception that the possibility for abuse - or the cost of the shortacting, recommended treatments, as they aren't a cheap generic - that dictates the suggestion. I CBA with drug misuse - tailing off strong painkillers a few years back was immensely irritating and timeconsuming, and I have absolutely zero desire to interact with junkies to flog them any medication.

    I follow all the CBT advice. Always have done. I won't even turn the bathroom light on if I'm tired because I know it'll wake me up so much, I won't be able to sleep afterwards. I get up if I'm not asleep within 20 minutes and won't go back until I'm really tired (or cold), but this has got beyond a joke now.

    If I could go to sleep by midnight and get up around 6, I'd be perfectly happy.


    Stupidly hungry now, so just off to see whether eating a ton of carbs for a change helps at all.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • tensandunits
    • By tensandunits 20th Apr 17, 8:30 PM
    • 814 Posts
    • 1,219 Thanks
    tensandunits
    Well, there's a troll thread here in the Arms to keep you amused, while it lasts, if you get really bored in your sleepless state.
    • happyandcontented
    • By happyandcontented 20th Apr 17, 8:42 PM
    • 673 Posts
    • 1,401 Thanks
    happyandcontented
    Try Magnesium Citrate as a supplement 30 mins before you want to sleep. They work for me.
    • bushbaby1103
    • By bushbaby1103 20th Apr 17, 10:23 PM
    • 4,800 Posts
    • 7,827 Thanks
    bushbaby1103
    Try Magnesium Citrate as a supplement 30 mins before you want to sleep. They work for me.
    Originally posted by happyandcontented
    I just looked this up, are you sure it helps you to sleep? It's a bowel cleanser. I think I'll pass on this and try the piriton.
    Yes, it's true hell IS other people
    And remember the problem is them, not you.
    Devilsand demons walk among us in human form.wake up people, it's a man.
    • happyandcontented
    • By happyandcontented 21st Apr 17, 7:18 PM
    • 673 Posts
    • 1,401 Thanks
    happyandcontented
    I just looked this up, are you sure it helps you to sleep? It's a bowel cleanser. I think I'll pass on this and try the piriton.
    Originally posted by bushbaby1103
    It can have a mild laxative effect I think, depending on dosage, although it has never affected me in that way. It is quite a well known aid to sleep
    https://draxe.com/magnesium-supplements/


    http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/marek-doyle/help-me-sleep-magnesium-secret-to-sleep-problems_b_3311795.html
    • Missli
    • By Missli 21st Apr 17, 11:38 PM
    • 7,058 Posts
    • 16,606 Thanks
    Missli
    B**ts sell a pillow spray made by "This Works" and after spraying this on my pillow I did get a reasonable night's sleep.

    I also found that hypnosis tapes helped ( not the American ones as the accent annoyed the hell out of me!).

    Maybe not the best person to suggest sleep ideas as I don't nod off till after one and wake up around six!!!!!!!!!!!
    Originally posted by elona
    I had difficulty getting to sleep for the first time in a while last night, but saw your post.

    I have This Works Stress Relief roller which is very similar to their spray. Slept really well after using it, so thank you.
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