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  • FIRST POST
    • thegirlinthegreenscarf
    • By thegirlinthegreenscarf 18th Apr 17, 1:22 PM
    • 15Posts
    • 16Thanks
    thegirlinthegreenscarf
    Starting Over
    • #1
    • 18th Apr 17, 1:22 PM
    Starting Over 18th Apr 17 at 1:22 PM
    Hi


    Decided that enough is enough. I need to come over from the "Dark Side" and try to act like an adult.


    I have spend my lunchtime setting up a new email address (not linked to my name) and an account on here and now I have no time left to look on the forums. ;-(


    Very quickly, I have recently transferred my debt onto a 0% credit card and am still paying of my previous car. I am not currently earning enough to have to pay back my student loans.


    Problems are: a) I have always been a spender, b) I still seem to spend my full time wages on part time salary (I have worked 4 days since my daugher was born) c) I do have that working mum guilt - not helped by all the "perfect" blogs, photos etc I need to call a halt. d) amazon, ebay etc are all too easy and accessible.

    This is not my first credit card debt. I think I need to break the pattern. If I am honest, deep inside I am concerned that I am happy to return things once I have bought them. Its the buying (online or in a shop) that I can't seem to stop. The last next sale slot I had, I bought stuff online to be delivered to the store, then forced myself to leave it at the store until it was returned to the warehouse 2 weeks later and credited on my account.


    So, advice please, a to do list (as basic as possible), suggestions for a spending diary, no spend challenges, moral support and even if you just want to say hi - all appreciated
    xxxxxx
    Last edited by thegirlinthegreenscarf; 18-04-2017 at 1:49 PM.
Page 1
    • GeorgianaCavendish
    • By GeorgianaCavendish 18th Apr 17, 5:28 PM
    • 196 Posts
    • 692 Thanks
    GeorgianaCavendish
    • #2
    • 18th Apr 17, 5:28 PM
    • #2
    • 18th Apr 17, 5:28 PM
    Hello and welcome!
    Love your username - is that a Becky Bloomwood reference? I read the Shopaholic books again recently and I found some of Ms Bloomwood's behaviour painfully familiar.

    I started my debt free diary at the end of January this year so I'm pretty new to all this too. There is lots of great advice in the diaries and the Debt Free Wannabe boards so have a browse when you have time.

    The things that really helped me:

    1. OnTrees account/app - you link this with your bank accounts and credit cards, it gives you a breakdown of exactly what you have spent over the past 12 weeks. Breaks everything down into categories, you can edit these and add new ones. I was spending blindly and I didn't have a good overview of where my money was going so I found this very useful (and scary!). It helped me identify the black holes and blind spots in my spending like buying coffee or lunch at work, and I could make easy changes to save some money.

    2. SoA (State of Affairs) - everyone will ask you to post one and although it is scary, it is really helpful to get an outside perspective on things. There were several things (like Spotify, gym membership etc) that I thought I couldn't live without but I was convinced to give them up or make a switch to cheaper supplier and I found that I can actually live without them This link has some advice on how to complete one : Help for the first time poster

    3. Knowledge is power. I willingly kept myself in the dark about the interest rates on my credit cards because I didn't like to think too much about how much debt I was in. BUT finding out exactly what interest rate I was paying (some of my cards have several different interest rates) and when these rates ran out was really helpful in terms of helping me prioritise what to pay off first. If you are like me, then make finding out your interest rates, statement dates etc one of the first things you do. Also, sometimes just by having a chat with your bank or card provider, you can get a lower interest rate. I called my bank to check something about my personal loan and they told me I could refinance on a lower interest rate which saved me just under £90 a month in repayments.

    4. YNAB (You Need A Budget) is a great piece of budgeting software. You get a 34 day free trial when you first sign up. HOWEVER, I think that OnTrees was more useful to me at the very beginning because I didn't have an accurate picture of where my money was going. YNAB have a great YouTube channel with lots of advice on how to get the most from their website and about budgeting in general, another thing that is worth a browse when you have time.

    5. Snowball calculator - to help you figure out the correct order for paying your debts off.

    6. Join Cashback, survey sites and market research focus groups. There are loads out there but I use TopCashBack for cashback, MySurvey for surveys and Trend Market Research and People for Research focus group sites (I can't keep up with too many!). I've been using TopCashBack for about 9 months and I've made nearly £400 in total (ok, I have also spent a lot on it!) ; I've made £40 from MySurvey since end of Jan and done two Focus Groups (£90 total) this year.

    7. Try cheaper brands. I used to buy certain brands because I assumed they were better quality, but I've been making an effort to try cheaper brands since January and I've been really pleased with the results. Biggest one for me was switching from Tesco & Waitrose to ALDI for my weekly shop. ALDI is amazing! I think a lot of their products are way better quality than Tesco or Waitrose and they are way, way cheaper. I'm a proper fangirl for them now I switched brands for a couple of skincare and toiletries too and found that I either preferred or didn't notice a difference when using a slightly cheaper brand.

    8. Clear cookies / Delete card / paypal information - if you have any websites that automatically store your card or paypal information then delete it. Clear your cookies. Unsubscribe from mailing lists if you know that certain ones always tempt you to buy something. Stop following the spendiest blogs/instagrams - I found there was one blogger that always prompted me to buy something, so I've just stopped reading her blog for the time being.

    Good luck! I'll subscribe to your diary so I can see how you are getting on
    Last edited by GeorgianaCavendish; 18-04-2017 at 5:38 PM. Reason: typo!
    Georgiana, Duchess of Debt-shire's April 2017 Debt Totals: HSBC Loan £12,498.33 / Barclaycard £9,882.76 / MBNA £1865.14 / HSBC Card £2340.10 / Catalog £ 695 / Dreams £517 / Holiday £0

    And don't forget the Student Loan! £15,199.37 (April 2016)
    • thegirlinthegreenscarf
    • By thegirlinthegreenscarf 18th Apr 17, 5:33 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    thegirlinthegreenscarf
    • #3
    • 18th Apr 17, 5:33 PM
    • #3
    • 18th Apr 17, 5:33 PM
    Hi yes it's a Becky reference ;-)
    Thanks for your reply xxx
    • thegirlinthegreenscarf
    • By thegirlinthegreenscarf 18th Apr 17, 5:35 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    thegirlinthegreenscarf
    • #4
    • 18th Apr 17, 5:35 PM
    • #4
    • 18th Apr 17, 5:35 PM
    Oh cool, can I subscribe to yours too? X
    • GeorgianaCavendish
    • By GeorgianaCavendish 18th Apr 17, 5:37 PM
    • 196 Posts
    • 692 Thanks
    GeorgianaCavendish
    • #5
    • 18th Apr 17, 5:37 PM
    • #5
    • 18th Apr 17, 5:37 PM
    Oh cool, can I subscribe to yours too? X
    Originally posted by thegirlinthegreenscarf
    You can, this is the link to my diary : GC's Debt Diary there is a box at the top to Subscribe (next to the bright pink Post Reply box) xx
    Georgiana, Duchess of Debt-shire's April 2017 Debt Totals: HSBC Loan £12,498.33 / Barclaycard £9,882.76 / MBNA £1865.14 / HSBC Card £2340.10 / Catalog £ 695 / Dreams £517 / Holiday £0

    And don't forget the Student Loan! £15,199.37 (April 2016)
    • thegirlinthegreenscarf
    • By thegirlinthegreenscarf 26th Apr 17, 9:36 AM
    • 15 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    thegirlinthegreenscarf
    • #6
    • 26th Apr 17, 9:36 AM
    • #6
    • 26th Apr 17, 9:36 AM
    Ok, I am probably not doing this is in a logical manner. I thought I had managed to save this month, and I have. Originally I had saved £200 and trasnferred it into another a/c/ But then my main a/c hit the overdraft and I had transferred £150 to cover it. So I had saved £50. I checked the bank again and its now minus £80.
    I have had a look at my money over the last month and I have spend over £200 on paypal - some are gifts but some are jewellery (for me) scentsey products (for me) and aloe vera products. I have spend over £100 eating out/take aways and £100 on "top up shops". I coiuld have saved about £400-£500 this month. And probably every month. I don't even know if I am posting this in the right place. If not, please direct me to where I should go, but definitley need to cancel the credit cards that are stored online.....
    • thegirlinthegreenscarf
    • By thegirlinthegreenscarf 26th Apr 17, 12:44 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    thegirlinthegreenscarf
    • #7
    • 26th Apr 17, 12:44 PM
    • #7
    • 26th Apr 17, 12:44 PM
    Hi


    What is the difference between onetrees and ynab? Are these definitely secure? Its lunctime and I am on the ynab youtube channel right now. Just downloaded the classic app too, but its in dollars. Is this normal or have I downloaded the wrong app?
    Last edited by thegirlinthegreenscarf; Yesterday at 12:50 PM.
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