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    • applepad
    • By applepad 18th Apr 17, 6:43 AM
    • 313Posts
    • 797Thanks
    applepad
    Cheapest time to buy kiln dried wood?
    • #1
    • 18th Apr 17, 6:43 AM
    Cheapest time to buy kiln dried wood? 18th Apr 17 at 6:43 AM
    I'm having a multi fuel stove fitted in a few weeks and I have been told that spring/summer is the cheapest time to buy wood?
    Looking at buying 1m3 of wood, hoping this and some smokeless fuel will last me a winter?
    But which month would you say was the cheapest ?
Page 1
    • firefox1956
    • By firefox1956 18th Apr 17, 11:10 AM
    • 959 Posts
    • 531 Thanks
    firefox1956
    • #2
    • 18th Apr 17, 11:10 AM
    • #2
    • 18th Apr 17, 11:10 AM
    1 cubic metre of wood to last you all winter ??
    Not going to be using it much then..................
    HTH
    • applepad
    • By applepad 18th Apr 17, 12:21 PM
    • 313 Posts
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    applepad
    • #3
    • 18th Apr 17, 12:21 PM
    • #3
    • 18th Apr 17, 12:21 PM
    1 cubic metre of wood to last you all winter ??
    Not going to be using it much then..................
    HTH
    Originally posted by firefox1956
    How much do you think I will need then? New to all this
    Guess stove will be on 4pm-10pm Mon -fri and noon to 10pm weekends, guess it's a how long is a piece of string question
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 18th Apr 17, 12:45 PM
    • 1,050 Posts
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    FreeBear
    • #4
    • 18th Apr 17, 12:45 PM
    • #4
    • 18th Apr 17, 12:45 PM
    It really depends on the size of the stove - Mine is rated at 6.4Kw and I've used around four cubic metres of stacked wood.

    Summer time is certainly the best time to get wood in, but I wouldn't waste money on kiln dried - Just get a couple of loads of well seasoned wood and stack it under cover.
    Her courage will change the world.

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    • applepad
    • By applepad 18th Apr 17, 12:56 PM
    • 313 Posts
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    applepad
    • #5
    • 18th Apr 17, 12:56 PM
    • #5
    • 18th Apr 17, 12:56 PM
    Summer time is certainly the best time to get wood in, but I wouldn't waste money on kiln dried - Just get a couple of loads of well seasoned wood and stack it under cover.[/QUOTE]

    Is 6 months enough time to dry out the seasoned wood?
    • matelodave
    • By matelodave 18th Apr 17, 1:25 PM
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    matelodave
    • #6
    • 18th Apr 17, 1:25 PM
    • #6
    • 18th Apr 17, 1:25 PM
    If it's seasoned then it should be dry enough, just keep it in a sheltered ventilated place so that it doesn't get rained on and the wind can blow around it..
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    • the_lunatic_is_in_my_head
    • By the_lunatic_is_in_my_head 18th Apr 17, 1:50 PM
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    the_lunatic_is_in_my_head
    • #7
    • 18th Apr 17, 1:50 PM
    • #7
    • 18th Apr 17, 1:50 PM
    I'm having a multi fuel stove fitted in a few weeks and I have been told that spring/summer is the cheapest time to buy wood?
    Looking at buying 1m3 of wood, hoping this and some smokeless fuel will last me a winter?
    But which month would you say was the cheapest ?
    Originally posted by applepad
    It depends on how big a space you want to heat and how well insulated it is. Softwood will pump out heat but will burn quicker.

    Seasoning times depend on the wood (generally speaking hardwood 2 years, softwood 1 year assuming it's not cut down when full of sap) and where it is stored. If you get sun and have space to lay your split logs out to dry or a place to stack the logs that will get a lot of wind this will be best for drying them out.

    If you buy seasoned wood it should be dry enough to burn (you can buy a moisture tester on Amazon and a decent wood supplier shouldn't mind you splitting and checking a few logs, about 20% or lower is ideal).

    Also worth buying a flue thermometer to give you an indication of whether you are burning at an efficient temperature.
    • A. Badger
    • By A. Badger 18th Apr 17, 7:56 PM
    • 5,045 Posts
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    A. Badger
    • #8
    • 18th Apr 17, 7:56 PM
    • #8
    • 18th Apr 17, 7:56 PM
    I would second the recommendation to avoid kiln dried wood. It takes energy to dry the material and energy is expensive in the UK.

    Ask around to find a reliable supplier and buy it as soon as you can. Other replies have been right about how to store it - sheltered but open to the air,

    As for smokeless fuel, many sources have a summer rate but you will have to shop around to find the start dates as they vary. The cheapest way to buy it is by the pallet load (a metric tonne, for example) but you will need somewhere to store 50 or so brightly coloured bags (so probably not by the front door) and delivery drivers are quite likely to dump the pallet at the kerbside and leave you to do the rest. Check eBay and Google for suppliers.

    Another consideration is that you may need to experiment a little to find the best fuel for your particular application. My advice would be to start with a mid-price smokeless like Newflame and see how that goes.
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 18th Apr 17, 8:29 PM
    • 2,540 Posts
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    Ectophile
    • #9
    • 18th Apr 17, 8:29 PM
    • #9
    • 18th Apr 17, 8:29 PM
    Whenever I buy "seasoned" wood, I always try to keep it another summer, as it burns a lot better then. So I tend to buy in the spring.

    Most woods require a good 2 years to season properly. Some even longer.

    If you do want to buy kiln-dried wood, then you need somewhere really dry to keep it. Otherwise, it will just get damp again on the first windy rainy day.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • jeepjunkie
    • By jeepjunkie 19th Apr 17, 3:49 PM
    • 1,341 Posts
    • 1,290 Thanks
    jeepjunkie
    Two stoves here


    Personally although logs can be great and I'll happily burn them if going a begging, but...

    Must be properly seasoned which, round here, they almost never are.

    Storage space.

    They burn better in a larger stove unless you can get your supplier to provide smaller logs.

    Expensive even if free by the time you lug them around, cut, stack etc...

    I just get smokeless ovals and briquettes Cheaper and less hassle.


    EDIT: Suggest 3-4 cubic metre bags.
    Last edited by jeepjunkie; 19-04-2017 at 3:51 PM.
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