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  • FIRST POST
    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 17th Apr 17, 9:56 PM
    • 2,207Posts
    • 343Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    Buying a garden shed (possibly online)?
    • #1
    • 17th Apr 17, 9:56 PM
    Buying a garden shed (possibly online)? 17th Apr 17 at 9:56 PM
    I've reluctantly come to accept that we're going to have to have a wooden shed rather than the block built one i want as it'll simply take too long to save for a block built shed.
    The current one is approx 9ft-x-7ft & i'll be looking at about a 12ft-x-11ft. Would've been a tad bigger for block but for timber i'll go 12x11.

    Has anyone here used any online shed builder websites & can either rate or slate them?

    Also can anyone offer any pointers, things to look out for or include etc that i may not think of? The base too?

    We'll be storing a couple of bikes in there, power washer, a big jumbo bag of kindling, i'd want to store a tool chest in there, depending on how much weight it could take & whether that'd be an ok/bad idea.
    I've seen the father in law's shed he got & one thing i noticed was that i'd like to have some sort of insulation but don't know whether this would present its own problems or not. Whatever thickness i could have & then ply boards on top maybe. Maybe insulation also at the roof & board this out also perhaps, or maybe that'd be overkill.

    If you can't already tell - i'm clueless

Page 1
    • d0nkeyk0ng
    • By d0nkeyk0ng 17th Apr 17, 10:33 PM
    • 369 Posts
    • 140 Thanks
    d0nkeyk0ng
    • #2
    • 17th Apr 17, 10:33 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Apr 17, 10:33 PM
    Have a look at tigersheds. Our house came with this one. Feels sturdy and comes in different sizes and styles.
    • patman99
    • By patman99 17th Apr 17, 11:06 PM
    • 7,823 Posts
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    patman99
    • #3
    • 17th Apr 17, 11:06 PM
    • #3
    • 17th Apr 17, 11:06 PM
    I must admit that when I had the task of replacing a shed for my mum I ended up buying a plastic shed as it was cheaper than the wooden version of the same size.

    No need to stain it, replace the felt or patch it up as it rots.

    Seriously though, If I were building for my use, it would be breeze block or brick. Plenty of each given away for free on my local freegle group.
    Never Knowingly Understood.

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    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 18th Apr 17, 6:11 AM
    • 22,122 Posts
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    Davesnave
    • #4
    • 18th Apr 17, 6:11 AM
    • #4
    • 18th Apr 17, 6:11 AM
    I
    I've seen the father in law's shed he got & one thing i noticed was that i'd like to have some sort of insulation but don't know whether this would present its own problems or not. Whatever thickness i could have & then ply boards on top maybe. Maybe insulation also at the roof & board this out also perhaps, or maybe that'd be overkill.

    If you can't already tell - i'm clueless
    Originally posted by JustAnotherSaver
    Don't insulate a shed with any kind of fibre material. Water will get in and it won't get out. I speak from experience of the idiot who left me a shed here, soggily insulated.

    And against what? I bet he never worked in it on a freezing day!
    Working subliminally.
    • mysterymurdoch
    • By mysterymurdoch 18th Apr 17, 6:52 AM
    • 86 Posts
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    mysterymurdoch
    • #5
    • 18th Apr 17, 6:52 AM
    • #5
    • 18th Apr 17, 6:52 AM
    Little point insulating it if there's no heat source/fire.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 18th Apr 17, 9:20 AM
    • 28,396 Posts
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    getmore4less
    • #6
    • 18th Apr 17, 9:20 AM
    • #6
    • 18th Apr 17, 9:20 AM
    Spend the money to get a proper roof(not felt)

    get it off the ground ideally with ventilation under.

    if getting things like builders bags full in, needs to have wide double doors to take a wide wheeled load.


    if you want a 365day man cave that will probably need more money than a shed, decent power & maybe water
    • Chrishazle
    • By Chrishazle 18th Apr 17, 9:32 AM
    • 384 Posts
    • 225 Thanks
    Chrishazle
    • #7
    • 18th Apr 17, 9:32 AM
    • #7
    • 18th Apr 17, 9:32 AM
    +1 for Tiger sheds - just helped a friend build his second one, good quality and reasonable price. We'd previously built a cheap one, was an absolute nightmare!!

    3x3 fence posts are good for keeping the base of the shed off the ground, also make it fairly easy to get level before putting the base down.

    The 20x10 Tiger shed we've just built has 43mm framing, so insulating it would be fairly easy using 40mm Klingspan then 12mm ply - which is what I did when I built my workshop.

    Consider a pent shed rather than a traditional pitch roof, much easier to build!!
    • J B
    • By J B 18th Apr 17, 6:36 PM
    • 2,157 Posts
    • 688 Thanks
    J B
    • #8
    • 18th Apr 17, 6:36 PM
    • #8
    • 18th Apr 17, 6:36 PM
    A guy near here runs https://www.smithssectionalbuildings.co.uk/

    He builds to order whatever you want - it may be worth a call perhaps??
    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 18th Apr 17, 9:15 PM
    • 2,207 Posts
    • 343 Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    • #9
    • 18th Apr 17, 9:15 PM
    • #9
    • 18th Apr 17, 9:15 PM
    No need to stain it, replace the felt or patch it up as it rots.

    Seriously though, If I were building for my use, it would be breeze block or brick.
    Originally posted by patman99
    I know tannalised can rot but it's better than dipped or untreated and it'd be what i'd be looking at going if i went with a timber shed.

    Of course i would prefer block built but the cost dictates and i could afford a timber shed many years sooner than a block built shed, unfortunately. If it was just one or two years then i'd wait it out but it's going to be a good number of years. Too much to wait.

    Don't insulate a shed with any kind of fibre material. Water will get in and it won't get out. I speak from experience of the idiot who left me a shed here, soggily insulated.

    And against what? I bet he never worked in it on a freezing day!
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    I was thinking on the lines of Kingspan / Quinntherm / Celotex etc. Would this be ok material? I can source damaged sheets at low/no cost.
    I wasn't thinking on the lines of rockwool

    Spend the money to get a proper roof(not felt)
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    what do you mean by 'proper' roof?

    I've heard of these 'shingles' being used for a roof but we had some specially ordered in for a customer last week & they're pretty thin things i noticed.

    Out of interest, what is so bad about felt? And i mean reasonable felt - not top of the range 1000 per square inch but also not your wafer thin 10p per 100sq mtr either.

    if getting things like builders bags full in, needs to have wide double doors to take a wide wheeled load.
    This wont be necessary actually. I'll just put the bag in there & fill it whilst it's in. It's how i've done it in the existing shed. Just stick the bag in the corner & bring the kindling that i cut up at my mothers in 25kg bags and 'pour' in.

    if you want a 365day man cave that will probably need more money than a shed, decent power & maybe water
    I'm not Mr DIY so i wont be spending my days in there to be honest.
    Really, what i'm looking for is just something that'll be dry, warm enough (but not toasty so i have to strip off in the middle of winter) and spacious with enough space to accommodate anything that may get thrown in in the future that i haven't yet planned for. It wont be a workshop where i'm making a load of things out of wood or whatever. All that's beyond me

    Consider a pent shed rather than a traditional pitch roof, much easier to build!!
    Originally posted by Chrishazle
    Aside from the ease of building, is there any pros/cons to either or is it purely just personal preference on the looks front?


    And thanks for the link JB

    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 18th Apr 17, 9:32 PM
    • 22,122 Posts
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    Davesnave


    I was thinking on the lines of Kingspan / Quinntherm / Celotex etc. Would this be ok material? I can source damaged sheets at low/no cost.
    I wasn't thinking on the lines of rockwool
    Originally posted by JustAnotherSaver
    Solid insulation, like Kinsgpan will be fine. Had that in the roof of the shed I inherited.
    Working subliminally.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 19th Apr 17, 3:34 AM
    • 28,396 Posts
    • 16,979 Thanks
    getmore4less
    what do you mean by 'proper' roof?

    I've heard of these 'shingles' being used for a roof but we had some specially ordered in for a customer last week & they're pretty thin things i noticed.

    Out of interest, what is so bad about felt? And i mean reasonable felt - not top of the range 1000 per square inch but also not your wafer thin 10p per 100sq mtr either.
    Originally posted by JustAnotherSaver
    Felt will need replacing sooner than you want.

    Many are going for EPDM Rubber Membrane Roof Covering
    like used on this Tiger one.
    http://www.tigersheds.com/product/tiger-garden-studio/

    to replace my felt roof I went for Bitumen corrugated sheet like
    http://www.homebase.co.uk/en/homebaseuk/coroline-black-roof-sheet---2m-397258
    they are 2.6 there is 3mm Onduline.

    .......
    Still think a big/double door makes a shed easier to get stuff in/out.
    • Annie1960
    • By Annie1960 19th Apr 17, 8:54 AM
    • 2,504 Posts
    • 1,428 Thanks
    Annie1960
    Also think about where you are going to position the shed. Place it well away from any trees, as it will rot much quicker if it's near or under a tree.
    • Kernel Sanders
    • By Kernel Sanders 19th Apr 17, 3:41 PM
    • 3,035 Posts
    • 1,253 Thanks
    Kernel Sanders
    Also think about where you are going to position the shed.
    Originally posted by Annie1960
    Also, if it's within a metre of a boundary, doesn't it need planning permission?
    • xyz123
    • By xyz123 19th Apr 17, 5:14 PM
    • 1,438 Posts
    • 355 Thanks
    xyz123
    Also, if it's within a metre of a boundary, doesn't it need planning permission?
    Originally posted by Kernel Sanders
    Onky if it's more than 30m2 I think.
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 19th Apr 17, 6:32 PM
    • 2,473 Posts
    • 1,379 Thanks
    TheCyclingProgrammer
    Also, if it's within a metre of a boundary, doesn't it need planning permission?
    Originally posted by Kernel Sanders
    No. Planning-wise, sheds are almost always covered under permitted development providing the maximum eaves height is 2.5m and a maximum height of 4m (2.5m with within 2 metres of boundary) - things may be different if you do not have permitted development rights for some reason.

    Building regulations may apply though, if the shed is is bigger than 15sqm and within 1m of a boundary and made of substantially combustible materials (e.g. wood).

    https://www.planningportal.co.uk/info/200130/common_projects/43/outbuildings/2
    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 19th Apr 17, 9:43 PM
    • 2,207 Posts
    • 343 Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    There's a couple of folk around here who've done things in their garden that i've wondered if they needed planning permission for.

    One was our immediate rear neighbour putting up a really tall fence. Must be a good bit over 10ft high.

    I wasn't complaining though ... it kept his irritating kids from shouting over to us every time they saw us

    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 19th Apr 17, 9:52 PM
    • 2,207 Posts
    • 343 Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    I knew there was something i wanted to touch on......

    damp / rusting.

    In our existing shed, which the previous owner must've built himself (not a bad effort and certainly way better than anything i could do but still not great) i put some metal objects. Tins of paint was one as well as other metalwork.

    After a not very long period of time i found that it had all rusted to varying degrees. Obviously not something i would be wanting.

    I don't know if a block built shed would've stopped this (or at least helped a lot) but that's now out of the question as said.

    So is there any way of reducing this? Would it be lining with Kingspan as mentioned earlier or any other method?

    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 20th Apr 17, 1:11 AM
    • 22,122 Posts
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    Davesnave
    There's a couple of folk around here who've done things in their garden that i've wondered if they needed planning permission for.

    One was our immediate rear neighbour putting up a really tall fence. Must be a good bit over 10ft high.
    Originally posted by JustAnotherSaver
    Where would anyone get fence posts that long? He must have used constructional timber. The chance of it being damaged in high winds would be so much greater too.

    There will be some dampness in any shed which isn't heated, regardless of construction material. I have some dampness in my block built barn which originates in the air. Condensation from the air will happen more in stone/block buildings, which hold onto the cold longer when the surrounding air heats up, resulting in water vapour condensing on the cold surfaces.
    Working subliminally.
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 20th Apr 17, 1:20 AM
    • 2,878 Posts
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    bouicca21
    When is a shed not a shed? I think because I'm in a flat I need planning permission for a shed. But the shed I want is a tiny sentry box type, and I'm wondering whether I could get away with calling it a cupboard.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 20th Apr 17, 7:44 AM
    • 22,122 Posts
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    Davesnave
    When is a shed not a shed?
    Originally posted by bouicca21
    I would say that if a person would not normally go inside it and could reach everthing inside without doing so, it's a cupboard. or outdoor box.
    Working subliminally.
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