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  • FIRST POST
    • MatthewAinsworth
    • By MatthewAinsworth 12th Apr 17, 6:41 PM
    • 2,862Posts
    • 1,141Thanks
    MatthewAinsworth
    Why do people buy expensive cars?
    • #1
    • 12th Apr 17, 6:41 PM
    Why do people buy expensive cars? 12th Apr 17 at 6:41 PM
    I don't understand why people buy cars which they know aren't likely to be either the cheapest to run, or safest? What's the point in a car that's so powerful it's dangerous and expensive to fuel and insure, or with rare parts? What don't we all drive corsas and fiestas? People carriers i could understand for large families, or a land rover if you need to pull a heavy trailor on a farm, but not for the school run.

    I don't think it impresses anyone, nobody really cares how anyone gets around, and "brand new" just translates to me into willing to pay a premium to drive off the forecourt. Expensive cars are highly vulnerable to vandalism too as well as depreciation
Page 8
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 18th Apr 17, 11:27 AM
    • 15,662 Posts
    • 8,974 Thanks
    motorguy
    So why don't you spend some time and learn about cars?. I can never understand why people happily pay thousands of pounds for things without understanding them?.


    If the only reason you buy knew is because your too lazy to do some research then your lazyness is costing you thousands of pounds in depreciation a year!
    Originally posted by takman
    Its a convenience thing and its not just about changing an oil filter or discs every now and again.

    Older cars these days tend to fail with engine management lights on, so whilst code readers are cheap you need to know how to interpret that. Then theres the finding and fitting of the parts.

    Older cars these days that have failures tend to be things like DMFs, clutches, turbos, DPFs (if its a diesel), fuel pumps, injectors, etc, etc.

    All hassle and all big ticket items.

    And not everyone wants to get their hands dirty - i know i dont and neither would my wife.
    Last edited by motorguy; 18-04-2017 at 11:37 AM.
    You are not special. You are not a beautiful and unique snowflake.
    • fred246
    • By fred246 18th Apr 17, 11:38 AM
    • 884 Posts
    • 484 Thanks
    fred246
    That's sad. I thought you had an Austin A45! I was saying to my friend yesterday that vintage cars are the only ones​ that impress me anymore.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 18th Apr 17, 11:54 AM
    • 13,081 Posts
    • 17,300 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    It is a peculiarly British trait though.
    Originally posted by bigadaj
    No, it isn't.

    A recent Bbc piece on Brexit stated that the uk is seen as a rich vein of profit for car companies due to the preference for renting or lease deals and the larger turnover per head, they stated the average car in British roads is six years old, whereas it's ten years in Germany and nearly fifteen in Spain.
    There are nearly 200 countries in the world, you have compared the average age of cars in Britain with just two of them and determined that buying flash cars to impress the neighbours is a peculiarly British trait.

    Do you work for the Daily Mail?
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • Jackmydad
    • By Jackmydad 18th Apr 17, 12:06 PM
    • 1,096 Posts
    • 2,177 Thanks
    Jackmydad
    That's sad. I thought you had an Austin A45! I was saying to my friend yesterday that vintage cars are the only ones​ that impress me anymore.
    Originally posted by fred246
    It's not just me then who thinks that when I see "A45"
    And I'd agree about vintage cars, but I was talking to a bloke with a nice, well used vintage Riley sports car some time back, I said "That looks fun" and he said "Used to be, but not so much with the roads these days"

    Surprises me how sort of defensive people are about their choices though. As I said in an earlier post; people have what they want, they don't need to justify their choices to anyone else. It's not a competition. . . Is it?
    • buglawton
    • By buglawton 18th Apr 17, 12:58 PM
    • 7,003 Posts
    • 3,227 Thanks
    buglawton
    No, it isn't.



    There are nearly 200 countries in the world, you have compared the average age of cars in Britain with just two of them and determined that buying flash cars to impress the neighbours is a peculiarly British trait.

    Do you work for the Daily Mail?
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    I think it really is a British trait. Perhaps us folks feel deprived what with rainy weather and home living space per person 30% or so less than say, the Germans have, the compensation is that shiny new motor.
    • palgrave
    • By palgrave 18th Apr 17, 1:30 PM
    • 88 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    palgrave
    I was talking to two of our poorly paid clerical workers about cars. Thinking I would give some useful financial advice I said "please don't tell me you're on one of those buy a new car every 3 years contracts". "We're not rich like you" they said. "We can't afford to run an old car. We can't afford a repair." I am still struggling with this concept of the rich all driving old cars while the poor have to have new.
    Originally posted by fred246
    And that's the reason they're clerical workers on a low salary. They cannot understand simple concepts. In truth they probably just want a new car to show off to make up for their low quality of life
    • Tiddlywinks
    • By Tiddlywinks 18th Apr 17, 1:32 PM
    • 5,329 Posts
    • 18,470 Thanks
    Tiddlywinks
    Yep - the judgemental codswallop just keeps on coming....
    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 18th Apr 17, 1:36 PM
    • 2,401 Posts
    • 1,558 Thanks
    Car 54
    It's not just me then who thinks that when I see "A45"
    Originally posted by Jackmydad
    Austin was also my first thought.

    However, my second thought was that there never was an A45, and a quick Google seems to confirm that.
    • Jackmydad
    • By Jackmydad 18th Apr 17, 2:06 PM
    • 1,096 Posts
    • 2,177 Thanks
    Jackmydad
    You're right by the look of it.
    I never had one, they were getting a bit long in the tooth by my first car days. I didn't have a car until I was 25 I always rode motorbikes before then (and after for a fair time)
    Dad had a new A40 in about 1958-9. I think he actually had two, a pale blue one, rapidly followed by a red one (Tartan red?) Might have been something wrong with the first one. I don't know and nobody left to ask now. Anyway I knew that was an A40, But I thought the later model was an A45.
    Dad didn't really like either, and traded it in for a 12 month old Mk 2 Zodiac.
    • bertiewhite
    • By bertiewhite 18th Apr 17, 2:34 PM
    • 711 Posts
    • 749 Thanks
    bertiewhite
    I had stupid cars when I was living in forces accommodation but then again I was only paying low rent and the cars were tax free. These days, I'd much rather use my money for something that is more likely to appreciate such as bricks & mortar than a car which will depreciate as soon as I drive it off the forecourt!


    On hoof hearted's point, in my council estate there are BMW's and Mercedes from people who rent, it is their choice but i think its financially insane when they could otherwise save up a mortgage deposit to begin to get themselves out of the mire.
    Originally posted by MatthewAinsworth
    This reminds me of the time I asked my Dad as a child "why do people on the council estate have nicer cars than us?", to which he replied "because we have a nicer house than them Son".
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 18th Apr 17, 2:43 PM
    • 13,081 Posts
    • 17,300 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    I think it really is a British trait. Perhaps us folks feel deprived what with rainy weather and home living space per person 30% or so less than say, the Germans have, the compensation is that shiny new motor.
    Originally posted by buglawton
    It might be a British trait, but it certainly isn't unique to Britain.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • bigadaj
    • By bigadaj 18th Apr 17, 4:03 PM
    • 10,690 Posts
    • 6,981 Thanks
    bigadaj
    No, it isn't.



    There are nearly 200 countries in the world, you have compared the average age of cars in Britain with just two of them and determined that buying flash cars to impress the neighbours is a peculiarly British trait.

    Do you work for the Daily Mail?
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    It is, and I've provided two more examples than you have.

    There's the challenge, name another market that is more susceptible to these deals, the answer is there isn't one.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 18th Apr 17, 5:55 PM
    • 13,081 Posts
    • 17,300 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    It is, and I've provided two more examples than you have.

    There's the challenge, name another market that is more susceptible to these deals, the answer is there isn't one.
    Originally posted by bigadaj
    Of course there is.

    Did you even look at the picture I posted? An advert from the USA blatantly exploiting the US car buying public's desire to keep up with the Jones'

    The comparison that you used only shows that, on average, cars in the UK are younger than those in Spain and Germany. It certainly doesn't prove any neighbourly one upmanship tendencies.
    Last edited by Gloomendoom; 18-04-2017 at 5:58 PM.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 18th Apr 17, 6:19 PM
    • 9,909 Posts
    • 7,977 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    Austin introduced the A40 Devon and Dorset in 1947, which were succeeded by the A40 Somerset and then the A40 Cambridge, which ceased production in 1956. In 1958 a much smaller A40 was introduced, unofficially known as the A40 Farina as it was designed by Pininfarina. The minimally restyled Mk 2 followed in 1961 and after the fitting of the 1100 engine a year later, there were no more changes until it was discontinued in 1967.

    Unlike its larger Farina sisters, the A55 Cambridge Mk2 and the A99 Westminster, which became the A60 and the A110 respectively following restyling in 1961, the A40 remained the A40.

    The A40 was the only BMC Farina design which was not cloned.
    • bigadaj
    • By bigadaj 18th Apr 17, 9:35 PM
    • 10,690 Posts
    • 6,981 Thanks
    bigadaj
    Of course there is.

    Did you even look at the picture I posted? An advert from the USA blatantly exploiting the US car buying public's desire to keep up with the Jones'

    The comparison that you used only shows that, on average, cars in the UK are younger than those in Spain and Germany. It certainly doesn't prove any neighbourly one upmanship tendencies.
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    I think all you found was a very rare instance of American irony.

    You state there are two hundred countries that might be better examples than Germany and Spain, which ones are you picking, Outer Mongolia, Burkina Faso and Guatemala?

    The comparison with Germany should be apt because it is one of few developed countries that is wealthier than the uk, a poorer country would be expected to have older cars.

    A more apt if general observation is the level of personal debt, only the us rivals the levels achieved in the uk, and that excludes mortgages so represents what the country is spending on depreciating items rather than investments.
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