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  • FIRST POST
    • JoshyBoy
    • By JoshyBoy 11th Apr 17, 2:39 PM
    • 95Posts
    • 3Thanks
    JoshyBoy
    Overstating how much you earn when applying for a job.
    • #1
    • 11th Apr 17, 2:39 PM
    Overstating how much you earn when applying for a job. 11th Apr 17 at 2:39 PM
    Can overstating your salary come back and bite you in your backside, when you start a new job?
Page 4
    • DavidP24
    • By DavidP24 16th Jun 17, 10:03 AM
    • 1,736 Posts
    • 1,054 Thanks
    DavidP24
    Of course no Apology because it simply would not apply in the context the OP outlines because there is no legal duty to disclose.

    You make yourself look even MORE foolish for suggesting it could.

    Honestly!!
    Thanks, don't you just hate people with sigs !
    • Undervalued
    • By Undervalued 16th Jun 17, 10:21 AM
    • 2,861 Posts
    • 2,604 Thanks
    Undervalued
    Of course no Apology because it simply would not apply in the context the OP outlines because there is no legal duty to disclose.

    You make yourself look even MORE foolish for suggesting it could.

    Honestly!!
    Originally posted by DavidP24
    That is complete irrelevant. They are deliberately making a false statement in an attempt to fraudulently obtain a financial advantage.

    As I said, they are totally free to say how much they want, what they are not entitled to do is to lie.

    Yes, prosecutions are rare but they can and do happen.

    In your previous post you demanded that I provided the legislation, which you implied didn't exist. I have done just that so I think you are the one looking foolish / ignorant!
    Last edited by Undervalued; 16-06-2017 at 10:25 AM.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 16th Jun 17, 11:42 AM
    • 3,178 Posts
    • 5,181 Thanks
    sangie595
    It always amuses me how, when someone else tells you something that is untrue for their own advantage, it is always a lie. When you do it yourself, is an "over statement" or some such form of words. And the more people who do the same thing, the less it matters.

    A lie is a lie. If you lie, be prepared to accept that there are consequences when you are found out.
    • DavidP24
    • By DavidP24 16th Jun 17, 11:59 AM
    • 1,736 Posts
    • 1,054 Thanks
    DavidP24
    complete and utter nonsense
    That is complete irrelevant. They are deliberately making a false statement in an attempt to fraudulently obtain a financial advantage.

    As I said, they are totally free to say how much they want, what they are not entitled to do is to lie.

    Yes, prosecutions are rare but they can and do happen.

    In your previous post you demanded that I provided the legislation, which you implied didn't exist. I have done just that so I think you are the one looking foolish / ignorant!
    Originally posted by Undervalued

    I am not going to waste any more time on your totally irrelevant and useless posts on this matter, just nonsense.

    There are no prosecutions, not one.

    If you were talking about putting an inflated salary on a mortgage form your suggestion of fraud might be valid, but you are just talking nonsense, complete and utter nonsense.

    I am unsubing now so you reply if you want but you will be talking to yourself!
    Thanks, don't you just hate people with sigs !
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 16th Jun 17, 1:22 PM
    • 3,178 Posts
    • 5,181 Thanks
    sangie595

    I am not going to waste any more time on your totally irrelevant and useless posts on this matter, just nonsense.

    There are no prosecutions, not one.

    If you were talking about putting an inflated salary on a mortgage form your suggestion of fraud might be valid, but you are just talking nonsense, complete and utter nonsense.

    I am unsubing now so you reply if you want but you will be talking to yourself!
    Originally posted by DavidP24
    That is exceptionally rude and also untrue. In fact there have indeed been prosecutions, although pay rates have usually been part of a larger lie, and the fraud based on the whole lie, not just part of it. If you don't know what you are talking about, and you don't, kindly refrain from making accusations against respected posters who have had the courtesy of doing exactly what you asked for - providing you with the basis in law of what they have said. Frankly, you sound like a demented four year old throwing their toys out of the pram because they can't have their own way. Grow up.
    • Stu_N_
    • By Stu_N_ 16th Jun 17, 3:40 PM
    • 191 Posts
    • 108 Thanks
    Stu_N_
    I happened to see an article about this recently. I do wish I'd read it before I accepted my last job actually! (Although there's no telling if it would have resulted in me being offered a better salary in the end).


    Basically, as some posters have said, a hiring company has no right to know your salary history prior to making you an offer. Of course, if the offer is subject to references, they'll probably find out your salary if they want to, but that's post-offer so pretty much irrelevant.


    How much you earn is typically taboo in the private sector where 'salary bands' aren't really a thing. It's often discouraged or even contractually forbidden to discuss your salary with your colleagues. Therefore, why should you be forced to give this information to a prospective employer? Instead, you should say 'I have a figure of £x in mind', or 'I understand that typically, this role pays around £y - £x'.


    The best (or maybe funniest?) advice I saw was that you could say something like "This question is about my personal financial situation and I consider that to be confidential". If they insist, ask if their budget (or, if a recruiter, their client's budget) to fill the role, or current salaries for employees in that role, is confidential. If they say no, great! You can find out what they're paying other people for the job. If yes, you can say 'so we're agreed, this information is confidential. Here's the salary I have in mind...'


    You've gotta be willing to stand up for yourself!
    • mariposa687
    • By mariposa687 16th Jun 17, 4:55 PM
    • 73 Posts
    • 89 Thanks
    mariposa687
    It wouldn't cross my mind to lie about my salary, I don't see the point. I think it's important to be honest with people. I've also never been one of those people to lie on their CV - you just make things awkward for yourself when (not if) you get found out.
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