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Dog v. Human Gravy
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# 1
BigMummaF
Old 28-09-2007, 8:12 AM
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Default Dog v. Human Gravy

:rolleyes: I've seen doggy gravy on sale, in bottles rather like a table sauce but quite a bit dearer. Can anyone pass an opinion on them---I believe they come in beef or chicken varieties---or is it acceptable to use a 'human' stock cube or gravy powder?
There is a famous brand of dog toy [think a large monkey on a tall building in the USA!]that suggests freezing gravy & fruit juice as a treat for woofums. But it doesn't elaborate any further.....
  • How strong should said liquids be, given acceptable variations for individual taste?
  • Is that 'reduced salt/sugar' varieties where possible?
  • Fruit juice...fresh; concentrated; squeezed; squash; cordial?
  • Any particular fruits/veg to avoid, eg grapefruit; or encourage,eg pineapple?
I know about onions, but does that include leek & chives
Could anyone direct me towards a good website :confused: so I don't have to keep annoying you good folk
On behalf of pup, I thank you for your advice.
Full time Carer for Mum; harassed mother of three;
loving & loved by two 4-legged babies.


Last edited by BigMummaF; 28-09-2007 at 8:13 AM. Reason: spelling mistake...t'is early?!??
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# 2
Raksha
Old 28-09-2007, 8:11 PM
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I'd use home made gravy where ever possible (made with home made stock if possible) as stock cubes are very high in salt.

Many dogs really enjoy fruit - the only one to definatly avoid is grapes (and sultanas and raisins), many dogs love Apple and banana (mine form an orderly queue for a share of the apple core) and one of my owners used dried banana chips as treats/rewards.

http://www.companyofanimals.co.uk/kongrecipe.php - here's some recipes for stuffing you Kong (there, I said it <G>) Try those, then use your imagination......
Please forgive me if my comments seem abrupt or my questions have obvious answers, I have a mental health condition which affects my ability to see things as others might.
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# 3
MOLLYBRUSH
Old 28-09-2007, 10:48 PM
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Found the web-site you recommended very useful. Thanks. Getting our puppy on 20 Oct, half border, quarter jack russell and quarter yorkie (what a mix!). It's a long time since I had a dog and actually forgotten what to do so all this info is extremely useful.
There are three ways to get something done; do it yourself, hire someone or forbid your kids to do it.
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# 4
foreign correspondent
Old 29-09-2007, 12:13 AM
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ooh I would love to see a piccie of your little terrier pup when you get here!
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# 5
BigMummaF
Old 29-09-2007, 10:49 AM
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Thanks Raksha..had a feeling you would be able to help

I'm never sure if we should use brand names on these forums, so err on the side of caution!

Have you chosen a pup or name yet Molly? I have to admit that I wasn't too keen on having a dog, but pup is gorchus!!
Full time Carer for Mum; harassed mother of three;
loving & loved by two 4-legged babies.

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# 6
Wolfsbayne
Old 29-09-2007, 6:24 PM
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Just to let you know, we fed our dogs dried banana chips until the vet told us they were deep fried in oil before being dried. We quickly stopped and he has since lost 1kg in weight (the reason we went to banana chips in the first place was because they were a healthy treat).

Use fresh fruit wherever possible.
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# 7
JennyW
Old 01-10-2007, 11:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigMummaF View Post
:rolleyes: I've seen doggy gravy on sale, in bottles rather like a table sauce but quite a bit dearer. Can anyone pass an opinion on them---I believe they come in beef or chicken varieties---or is it acceptable to use a 'human' stock cube or gravy powder?
There is a famous brand of dog toy [think a large monkey on a tall building in the USA!]that suggests freezing gravy & fruit juice as a treat for woofums. But it doesn't elaborate any further.....
  • How strong should said liquids be, given acceptable variations for individual taste?
  • Is that 'reduced salt/sugar' varieties where possible?
  • Fruit juice...fresh; concentrated; squeezed; squash; cordial?
  • Any particular fruits/veg to avoid, eg grapefruit; or encourage,eg pineapple?
I know about onions, but does that include leek & chives
Could anyone direct me towards a good website :confused: so I don't have to keep annoying you good folk
On behalf of pup, I thank you for your advice.
Tesco's sell sachets of dog gravy in beef and chicken - 25p a sachet. They are quite thick so I water them down and store it the fridge. Works well for my dog.

Never use human gravy or stock cubes. Too much salt. My vet told me it's not good for dogs.

Here’s a list of some other foods to avoid feeding your dog:

- raw liver
- milk and other diary products - dogs are lactose intolerant
- cat food can cause metabolic imbalances
- tea, coffee and cola type drinks (similar to chocolate in terms of poison)
- bread dough
- turkey skin
- raw fish especially salmon
- some mushrooms
- raw eggs
- walnuts and macadamia nuts

I found this too:
Chocolate: baking chocolate is the worst, needing only 0.1 ounce per pound of body weight to kill a dog. Cocoa and milk chocolate should also be avoided. White chocolate is the least toxic, requiring 200 ounces per pound of body weight to cause death. It's the theobromine in chocolate that kills, found in chocolate liquor, coffe and tea.
Bones: Most types of bones will splinter, and these splinters may become lodged in the dog's throat. The best bone for a dog is the beef shin bone. Avoid chicken and pork bones.
Cassava root
Rhubarb
Onions: especially in large quantities. Onions are even more dangerous to cats.
Other things that might make an appearance in you kitchen that your dog shouldn't eat are:
Apple Seeds
Apricot Pits
Peach Pits
Pear Seeds
Avocado Leaves
Eggplant leaves
All parts tomato plant except the fruit
Uncooked Java beans
Acorns
I hope I don't have to tell you this, but:
Aluminum Foil can cut a dog's intestines, causing internal bleeding.
Plastic food wrap can cause choking or intestinal obstruction.


Tobacco, Marijuana, and Aspirin are also bad for your dog.
Alcohol isn't poisonous, but dogs will get drunk much more quickly than a human.
Caffeine: I haven't had much luck trying to find out how poisonous caffeine is to dogs, but I wouldn't advise giving them tea, coffee, jolt, etc.
Rich, fatty foods can cause pancreatitis.
Dogs are lactose intolerant. Dairy products can cause excessive gas and diarrhea.
Rawhides, cow hooves, and pigs' ears are hard to digest, and may cause vomiting or diarrhea if eaten too quickly. Cow hooves are hard enough that they can break a dog's tooth, and sharp splinters can become lodged in the intestinal tract.
Finally, watch out for Bloat (gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome or GDV), a condition that comes from eating too much too fast, especially in times of stress or just after exercise. Changes in diet and gas producing foods may also contribute to this condition. Most often occurring in large dogs, the symptoms are; a distended abdomen, abdominal discomfort, severe weakness and shock. This condition can be life threatening, and needs to be treated by a veterinarian as quickly as possible

Last edited by JennyW; 01-10-2007 at 11:39 AM.
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# 8
MOLLYBRUSH
Old 07-10-2007, 12:16 AM
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Have found so much info off this site. Think am better prepared for looking after pup than first child. Just remember it being a shock so I want to be more prepared to look after little one. We are calling her Tillie. Will post her photo and let you know how we are doing when we get her. Can't wait! Again, many thanks to the people who post all this fantastic information.
There are three ways to get something done; do it yourself, hire someone or forbid your kids to do it.
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# 9
suki1964
Old 07-10-2007, 12:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JennyW View Post
Tesco's sell sachets of dog gravy in beef and chicken - 25p a sachet. They are quite thick so I water them down and store it the fridge. Works well for my dog.

Never use human gravy or stock cubes. Too much salt. My vet told me it's not good for dogs.

Here’s a list of some other foods to avoid feeding your dog:

- raw liver
- milk and other diary products - dogs are lactose intolerant
- cat food can cause metabolic imbalances
- tea, coffee and cola type drinks (similar to chocolate in terms of poison)
- bread dough
- turkey skin
- raw fish especially salmon
- some mushrooms
- raw eggs
- walnuts and macadamia nuts

I found this too:
Chocolate: baking chocolate is the worst, needing only 0.1 ounce per pound of body weight to kill a dog. Cocoa and milk chocolate should also be avoided. White chocolate is the least toxic, requiring 200 ounces per pound of body weight to cause death. It's the theobromine in chocolate that kills, found in chocolate liquor, coffe and tea.
Bones: Most types of bones will splinter, and these splinters may become lodged in the dog's throat. The best bone for a dog is the beef shin bone. Avoid chicken and pork bones.
Cassava root
Rhubarb
Onions: especially in large quantities. Onions are even more dangerous to cats.
Other things that might make an appearance in you kitchen that your dog shouldn't eat are:
Apple Seeds
Apricot Pits
Peach Pits
Pear Seeds
Avocado Leaves
Eggplant leaves
All parts tomato plant except the fruit
Uncooked Java beans
Acorns
I hope I don't have to tell you this, but:
Aluminum Foil can cut a dog's intestines, causing internal bleeding.
Plastic food wrap can cause choking or intestinal obstruction.


Tobacco, Marijuana, and Aspirin are also bad for your dog.
Alcohol isn't poisonous, but dogs will get drunk much more quickly than a human.
Caffeine: I haven't had much luck trying to find out how poisonous caffeine is to dogs, but I wouldn't advise giving them tea, coffee, jolt, etc.
Rich, fatty foods can cause pancreatitis.
Dogs are lactose intolerant. Dairy products can cause excessive gas and diarrhea.
Rawhides, cow hooves, and pigs' ears are hard to digest, and may cause vomiting or diarrhea if eaten too quickly. Cow hooves are hard enough that they can break a dog's tooth, and sharp splinters can become lodged in the intestinal tract.
Finally, watch out for Bloat (gastric dilatation and volvulus syndrome or GDV), a condition that comes from eating too much too fast, especially in times of stress or just after exercise. Changes in diet and gas producing foods may also contribute to this condition. Most often occurring in large dogs, the symptoms are; a distended abdomen, abdominal discomfort, severe weakness and shock. This condition can be life threatening, and needs to be treated by a veterinarian as quickly as possible
Whilst Im sure you are replying in good faith but I think you will find that you are slightly out of date on some of the information you have supplied. Barf feeders regulary feed a wide selection of raw bones , raw meats, raw fish and raw eggshttp://www.ukbarfclub.co.uk/about-ba...-barf-diet.php

http://www.njboxers.com/faqs.htm

Although I dont completely feed raw, both my 3 yo cocker and now my 12 week old springer get raw meats, especially chicken wings as I just take them off the chicken before I cook it for us, offal, raw eggs (shell included) and raw fish. Both dogs also started life off getting one meal a day which included milk - goats milk as it is lower in lactose and less likely to bring on an intolerance which dogs are not born with - they develop. And cheese is a regular treat, a great bribe when training and also comes in handy when getting the worming tablets down
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# 10
BigMummaF
Old 07-10-2007, 11:13 AM
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I have been advised--on very good authority [ thanks!] that pup may need extra fibre in his diet. I'm assuming this is similar to a human diet, containing fruit & veg.

At the moment, he has a mix of eukanuba puppy kibble[I know..but we got it before I found out about the testing ]but mainly 'human' meals. He will have either shredded wheet biscuits or weet bix with a little semi-skimmed milk, & I add banana or apple some days, for breakfast.
He's beginning to leave his 'lunch' later in the day, so somedays becomes dinner[he's 6mths] & will have cooked beef mince, chicken, liver, egg, white fish, tinned sardines or mackeral...with chopped veg & pasta or rice. He also likes natural low fat yoghurt, & licking the lids & pots of flavoured ones, & peanut butter on granary toast!

Fresh water is always freely available.

I love porridge & make mine with just water, so would that be OK for him?

Molly, I have to agree with you about the info, & often think babies should come with a users manual...but I'm beginning to think they were a lot easier to wean than our pups!

HELP!
Full time Carer for Mum; harassed mother of three;
loving & loved by two 4-legged babies.

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# 11
suki1964
Old 07-10-2007, 6:05 PM
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No way am i telling you not to feed your dog how you wish, just I really do think you need to do a lot more research, reading up on canine nutrition,to work out what is a balanced diet for your dog.

Dogs cant digest fruit and vegetables the way we can so they are getting absolutely no nutritional value from them at all. Even raw feeders who feed veggies turn them into a pulp first to help with the digestion of them. Fruit and veggies are great as snacks or treats ortherwise - keeps their teeth clean and cuts back on the high fat processed treats aimed at dogs.

Pasta made from wheat can also cause problems in dogs, rather like many humans dogs do suffer wheat intolerance. Symptoms range from flakey skin to hyperactivity with upset tums or diahorrea being pretty common

A complete food will feed a dog all the nutrients it needs. There are times when maybe a bit of extra roughage is required, you will know when thats the case - when the anal glans fill up and need emptying . But a good quality kibble (as previously mentioned JWB, Arden grange, Burns )or wet food (Nature Diet natures choice and even PAH own brand) will decrease the likely hood of that happening.



Many people I know have gone over to Barf (bones and raw food ) feeding with great results, I have chosen to stick with a good quality complete simply because I just don't have the time or resources to feed a full Barf diet, just some days feeding raw meaty bone meals for a bit of variety
if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it

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# 12
Han
Old 07-10-2007, 7:22 PM
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Try this site for your own recipes.

http://www.i-love-dogs.com/dog-food-recipes.html
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