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  • FIRST POST
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 23rd Mar 17, 2:33 PM
    • 7,560Posts
    • 12,586Thanks
    andrewf75
    need new commuter bike
    • #1
    • 23rd Mar 17, 2:33 PM
    need new commuter bike 23rd Mar 17 at 2:33 PM
    I need a new commuting bike. Currently have a Ridgeback hybrid 21 speed that I have basically trashed by not maintaining it. I don’t have a long commute and not too hilly so should I be looking at fixed gear or enclosed hub bikes as these are more resistant to neglect? I just saw a Bobbin Noodle in a shop which got me thinking. Not looking to spend too much - around 300 ideally but would consider spending more if it will last longer.

    Thanks!
Page 2
    • fred246
    • By fred246 17th Apr 17, 8:22 AM
    • 853 Posts
    • 469 Thanks
    fred246
    As a daily commuter I don't clean my bike often. I only clean it when cleaning will result in serious reductions in bicycle weight. I have full length SKS Chromoplastic mudguards which get caked in mud. I remove the wheels and clean them and the insides of the mudguards. I then clean the drivetrain. It's all fidly little bits. Car servicing is all quick jobs one after the other.
    • bigbulldog
    • By bigbulldog 17th Apr 17, 10:00 AM
    • 563 Posts
    • 651 Thanks
    bigbulldog
    Rohloffs are supposed to be super reliable but are still very heavy and everything about them is expensive.
    Originally posted by fred246

    There are super reliable at a cost for that part alone your looking at over £400 plus.
  • archived user
    Yes servicing a car is very easy. All the tricky jobs have gone. The only thing slightly tricky is a cambelt change.
    Originally posted by fred246
    you cannot be serious ! cambelt change is ridiculous nowadays. You cannot get your hands down the sides of the engines.You need a pit . I used to be able to change an alternator in less than 20 minutes but it took me nearly a weekend fighting my way to get at the thing just in an old Corsa C hatchback So much extra stuff has been rammed into the engine bays nowadays. theres no room . I have a Corsa D and cannot even get at the headlight bulb without major surgery. Unless you are talking about an old car or are a pro mechanic "you cannot be serious "
    To the OP I implore you to look out for a Planet X London road commuter bike on Ebay. I ve seen these quality lightweight commuters appearing for less than £300 in either straight or drop handlebars . I got a virtually brand new carbon fibre Planet X 8 kilo bike for only £600 with top quality group set. They will come up eventually. Planet X are leading the way in offering the best prices for really good gear.
    Last edited by House Martin; 19-04-2017 at 10:20 PM.
    • fred246
    • By fred246 19th Apr 17, 10:47 PM
    • 853 Posts
    • 469 Thanks
    fred246
    I have a pit but don't use it for cambelts as it doesn't help. Alternator removal is not part of servicing but have done it quite easily on my last 2 cars. Sometimes you need to do some disassembly but it's not rocket science. People who work in garages don't have smaller hands than anyone else. Parts and tools seem cheaper than they have ever been.
    • Richard53
    • By Richard53 2nd May 17, 2:03 AM
    • 2,533 Posts
    • 2,159 Thanks
    Richard53
    There's absolutely no way in hell that servicing a car is going to be easier than cleaning a bicycle!
    Originally posted by esuhl
    He didn't say easier, he said it didn't take as long. I can believe that. On my Mondeo, I could change oil and oil, fuel, air and pollen filters in an hour. Add a full check of the brakes (wheels off, pads and discs), and a change of coolant, two hours.


    If the bike is mucky and/or I want to do a really thorough job, I can easily spend half a day on just 'cleaning' the bike.
    An hour alone spells freedom to the slave.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 2nd May 17, 3:39 AM
    • 7,579 Posts
    • 5,375 Thanks
    esuhl
    If the bike is mucky and/or I want to do a really thorough job, I can easily spend half a day on just 'cleaning' the bike.
    Originally posted by Richard53
    You're kidding me? All that really matters is the drivetrain and the brakes. There's not much more to a bike anyway!

    Hose the bike down, spray on cleaner, wipe, rinse. Then clean the drivetrain, derailleurs and brakes.

    I don't know if it helps, but I've found that using wax instead of oil on my chain has made a big difference and stops any gunk build-up. And there's some fluorescent yellow Muc-Off drivetrain degreaser that is incredibly good at degreasing any part of your bike that really needs it.

    You don't need to spend hours cleaning your bike... there are probably lots of shortcuts you can take.

    What is it that takes so long?
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 10th May 17, 3:40 PM
    • 7,560 Posts
    • 12,586 Thanks
    andrewf75
    Just ressurecting this thread. Thinking about getting this:
    https://www.decathlon.co.uk/nework-500-urban-hybrid-bike-id_8376372.html
    I know much is down to personal choice, but any thoughts?
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 10th May 17, 5:12 PM
    • 1,400 Posts
    • 1,215 Thanks
    parking_question_chap
    Its quite heavy.
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 10th May 17, 5:39 PM
    • 7,560 Posts
    • 12,586 Thanks
    andrewf75
    Thanks. Compared to what though? I thought 13.5kg wasn't bad.
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 11th May 17, 1:20 PM
    • 2,333 Posts
    • 1,543 Thanks
    Johnmcl7
    It looks a good bike for the price, I assume some of the weight comes from the gear hub as I had an eight speed one which added a chunk of weight to the back of the bike. That said though it seems it's what you're looking for when you say your commute is short and not hilly and therefore the lack of gear range isn't an issue. I've a friend who has a short commute to work and back who didn't need the range of gears from the derailleurs but wanted a little more than a single speed, he bought a cheap Dawes hybrid with a three speed hub and he's been pleased with it so far.

    I had a look over some of the other bikes in this price range although one big plus of the Decathlon bike is the disc brakes which for day to day cycling in all weather I'd prefer over the rim brakes.

    John
    Last edited by Johnmcl7; 11-05-2017 at 1:23 PM.
    • elverson
    • By elverson 11th May 17, 1:23 PM
    • 671 Posts
    • 398 Thanks
    elverson
    If you're going to spend that much you may as well go for either a Decathlon road bike (Triban range) or a last-season Specialized hybrid if you can get one.
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 11th May 17, 2:50 PM
    • 7,560 Posts
    • 12,586 Thanks
    andrewf75
    If you're going to spend that much you may as well go for either a Decathlon road bike (Triban range) or a last-season Specialized hybrid if you can get one.
    Originally posted by elverson
    I like the Triban but I use a child seat to take my son to nursery on the back and I think for that I prefer the more upright position of this style rather than a road bike
    If it wasn't for that I'd probably go for the Triban. Does that view make sense?
    • fred246
    • By fred246 11th May 17, 9:23 PM
    • 853 Posts
    • 469 Thanks
    fred246
    Three speed hubs are pretty standard in Holland where it is flat. One of my fleet has a three speed hub. They are good but you have to be prepared to stand up to pedal up a hill. My issue with them is the whole concept of a box of small springs, pawls etc surrounded by a wheel. It's OK when they work. If you can't fix them yourself you probably have to pay a large labour charge to fix them or a big bill to replace it with wheel rebuilding costs. I have another bike which I prefer which is like the Bobbin Noodle. Single chainring at the front with 8 speed derailleur. It's light, easy to maintain but still not great at steep hills.
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 15th May 17, 3:14 PM
    • 7,560 Posts
    • 12,586 Thanks
    andrewf75
    Leaning towards this one now
    https://www.decathlon.co.uk/riverside-900-hybrid-bike-id_8379018.html
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 22nd May 17, 12:53 AM
    • 2,333 Posts
    • 1,543 Thanks
    Johnmcl7
    I'm not convinced about a suspension fork for that sort of bike as they add cost, weight and complexity but not much benefit on the road nor really off road either. I ride a variety of bikes (rigid, front suspension, full suspension and tyre widths from narrow road tyres to massive fat tyres) and I find suspension forks are great for absorbing impacts when riding drops or jumps but not so great at smoothing out rough surfaces. For that I prefer a wider tyre which can be run a bit softer.

    If you are planning any amount of technical off road riding you'd be better with a cheap hardtail mountain bike then put slicker tyres on it for road riding. Otherwise I'd stick with a rigid fork.

    John
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 22nd May 17, 12:04 PM
    • 7,560 Posts
    • 12,586 Thanks
    andrewf75
    Thanks, although too late as I've ordered it now.
    Suspension fork was a downside for me, as you say pointless unless doing proper off-road, which the bike isn't suitable for anyway. But still thought it was the best bike for the money.
    • Richard53
    • By Richard53 24th May 17, 1:18 PM
    • 2,533 Posts
    • 2,159 Thanks
    Richard53
    What is it that takes so long?
    Originally posted by esuhl
    I'm enjoying what I am doing
    An hour alone spells freedom to the slave.
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