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    • lotto
    • By lotto 19th Mar 17, 12:21 PM
    • 77Posts
    • 3Thanks
    lotto
    Visa application costs
    • #1
    • 19th Mar 17, 12:21 PM
    Visa application costs 19th Mar 17 at 12:21 PM
    My daughter in law is in the process of applying for the renewal of her visa. Since being in the U.K. (for two years) she has worked and paid National Insurance and tax. She is now being asked as part of the visa renewal to pay over £500 for NHS cover. If this is not paid upfront the visa application will not be processed. This is in addition to the £1000+ for the visa itself.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Page 1
    • izoomzoom
    • By izoomzoom 19th Mar 17, 12:44 PM
    • 1,410 Posts
    • 1,980 Thanks
    izoomzoom
    • #2
    • 19th Mar 17, 12:44 PM
    • #2
    • 19th Mar 17, 12:44 PM
    Don't really know what advise you want. The NHS surcharge is compulsory and was brought in to relieve some of the financial strain on the NHS.

    As soon as your DIL can apply for ILR, I suggest she does.
    LBM Nov 08 CC debt 6450.

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    • Voyager2002
    • By Voyager2002 19th Mar 17, 12:57 PM
    • 11,455 Posts
    • 7,752 Thanks
    Voyager2002
    • #3
    • 19th Mar 17, 12:57 PM
    • #3
    • 19th Mar 17, 12:57 PM
    Does she really want to stay in England? Presumably your son is a British citizen and so the two of them enjoy the right to Freedom of Movement under EU laws. They could live and work in any of the EU member countries other than the UK without having to pay a penny for the visa.
    • lotto
    • By lotto 19th Mar 17, 1:17 PM
    • 77 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    lotto
    • #4
    • 19th Mar 17, 1:17 PM
    • #4
    • 19th Mar 17, 1:17 PM
    I understand why, and agree with the contribution to NHS for those who are using it without contributing to it, but I don't understand why she should be contributing twice!

    My son now wants to live in his own country, after spending five years studying/ working in Japan with his wife, who in turn doesn't want to live off the state, but work and pay for services through tax and NI contributions.

    The reason for asking for advice was to see if anyone knew of any appeal system.
    • IAmWales
    • By IAmWales 19th Mar 17, 1:26 PM
    • 784 Posts
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    IAmWales
    • #5
    • 19th Mar 17, 1:26 PM
    • #5
    • 19th Mar 17, 1:26 PM
    I understand why, and agree with the contribution to NHS for those who are using it without contributing to it, but I don't understand why she should be contributing twice!

    My son now wants to live in his own country, after spending five years studying/ working in Japan with his wife, who in turn doesn't want to live off the state, but work and pay for services through tax and NI contributions.

    The reason for asking for advice was to see if anyone knew of any appeal system.
    Originally posted by lotto
    Do you think their NI covers the full cost of healthcare? It doesn't, and if they have or are planning to have children it won't even come close.

    There is no right to appeal.
    • lotto
    • By lotto 19th Mar 17, 3:37 PM
    • 77 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    lotto
    • #6
    • 19th Mar 17, 3:37 PM
    • #6
    • 19th Mar 17, 3:37 PM
    I know their contributions would not cover full NHS cover for everyone, (neither would yours or mine) but it has definitely covered hers and others for the time she has been in this country. She hasn't made a single trip to a hospital or doctor and if she did it would be covered by Private Health care.

    They certainly don't expect to get something for nothing.
    • harz99
    • By harz99 19th Mar 17, 3:47 PM
    • 2,410 Posts
    • 2,354 Thanks
    harz99
    • #7
    • 19th Mar 17, 3:47 PM
    • #7
    • 19th Mar 17, 3:47 PM
    I know their contributions would not cover full NHS cover for everyone, (neither would yours or mine) but it has definitely covered hers and others for the time she has been in this country. She hasn't made a single trip to a hospital or doctor and if she did it would be covered by Private Health care.

    They certainly don't expect to get something for nothing.
    Originally posted by lotto


    Unfortunately when any of us go live/work in another country other than where we were born, we have to live by the rules of that country whether we agree with them or not.


    In this case that means paying the NHS supplementary charge or moving on elsewhere. AFAIK there is no appeal. The choice is your daughter in law's to make.
    • emmatthews
    • By emmatthews 19th Mar 17, 4:49 PM
    • 641 Posts
    • 1,241 Thanks
    emmatthews
    • #8
    • 19th Mar 17, 4:49 PM
    • #8
    • 19th Mar 17, 4:49 PM
    In all honesty I think £500 is an absolute bargain. I understand she has also been making contributions, but it is still very little to pay for the services offered by the NHS.

    Routine doctors appointments, A&E visits and pregnancy/childbirth are not usually covered by private health insurance either.
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 19th Mar 17, 4:54 PM
    • 29,332 Posts
    • 18,545 Thanks
    DCFC79
    • #9
    • 19th Mar 17, 4:54 PM
    • #9
    • 19th Mar 17, 4:54 PM
    She just needs to pay up.
    Je Suis Charlie
    • WillowCat
    • By WillowCat 20th Mar 17, 4:14 PM
    • 668 Posts
    • 757 Thanks
    WillowCat
    Presumably then she will no longer need private healthcare. She can use the money she saves from giving that up to pay for the NHS charge.
    • ognum
    • By ognum 20th Mar 17, 4:32 PM
    • 4,445 Posts
    • 6,651 Thanks
    ognum
    My daughter in law is in the process of applying for the renewal of her visa. Since being in the U.K. (for two years) she has worked and paid National Insurance and tax. She is now being asked as part of the visa renewal to pay over £500 for NHS cover. If this is not paid upfront the visa application will not be processed. This is in addition to the £1000+ for the visa itself.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
    Originally posted by lotto
    I clearly don't know if you have ever lived in another country other than your own. I have lived in two other countries for an extended period.

    In the USA I was not allowed to work, I went as a hanger on to my husbands visa and the conditions were that I didn't work, no right of appeal that was the condition. ( I volunteered)

    In another country I queued up for hours on end each year to get a police statement and then queued again for hours to pay through the nose to get a passport stamp to say I could reside but not work!

    These were the conditions for the countries I lived in, no right of appeal. Pay up and put up or ship out. It's a hard feeling but that's the situation.
    • thorsoak
    • By thorsoak 20th Mar 17, 5:29 PM
    • 5,396 Posts
    • 24,614 Thanks
    thorsoak
    When my daughter and her OH lived in Japan,and had baby no 2, they had to pay for health insurance there, even though they had lived and worked and paid Japanese taxes there for three years before she was born - and had to pay more for her to be registered there, although they also had to pay for her British passport .....and when they came back to the UK, they had to pay for NH treatment because they haven't paid in for the years that they were out of the country - it's the way things are.
    • Sicard
    • By Sicard 21st Mar 17, 8:11 AM
    • 557 Posts
    • 472 Thanks
    Sicard
    When I got my Kenyan wife to the UK we applied for a 'leave to remain' visa. She had to go to an English learning course and a Citizenship course as part of the conditions. The visa was expensive and as it was about 10 years ago I can't recall how long the process took but when it was provided she could work and be eligible for free healthcare. Plus she could then bring 2 of her kids over and get the same visas for them.
    Part of the inhumanity of the computer is that, once it is competently programmed and working smoothly, it is completely honest.
    Isaac Asimov
    • bamgbost
    • By bamgbost 21st Mar 17, 9:56 AM
    • 206 Posts
    • 62 Thanks
    bamgbost
    unfortunately, as the people above has said. its compulsory. No choice over it. Sorry
    • clint_S
    • By clint_S 21st Mar 17, 10:32 AM
    • 357 Posts
    • 553 Thanks
    clint_S
    When I got my Kenyan wife to the UK we applied for a 'leave to remain' visa. She had to go to an English learning course and a Citizenship course as part of the conditions. The visa was expensive and as it was about 10 years ago I can't recall how long the process took but when it was provided she could work and be eligible for free healthcare. Plus she could then bring 2 of her kids over and get the same visas for them.
    Originally posted by Sicard
    When my American Wife came over she also had to complete English language course and a citizenship test. Sometime the system is stupid, but it's stupid for everyone.


    I can't see any reason why your daughter in law should be given an exclusion.
    • mgdavid
    • By mgdavid 21st Mar 17, 4:38 PM
    • 5,159 Posts
    • 4,331 Thanks
    mgdavid
    ...........
    I can't see any reason why your daughter in law should be given an exclusion.
    Originally posted by clint_S
    I don't think the OP has said anything about anyone excluding her. Did you mean an exception?
    A salary slave no more.....
    • itchyfeet123
    • By itchyfeet123 26th Mar 17, 11:27 AM
    • 351 Posts
    • 395 Thanks
    itchyfeet123
    It's a blatant cash grab. Immigrants are already paying taxes. They may have been doing so for a shorter period of time, but they've also been consuming NHS services for a shorter period of time. On average, immigrants are healthier and place less demand on health services than native populations. So even without the surcharge, immigration is a net benefit in terms of funding for the NHS. The surcharge just adds to it.

    That said, so what? The whole point of any health care system - whether a public one like the NHS or an insurance-based one - is to spread the costs. Most people will pay in more than they consume, while a few will consume more than they pay in. Because there's so much chance involved in determining which group any person will be in, most people agree that is better to spread the costs than to risk having to pay cash for treatment after, say, a car crash.

    In terms of money spent, I objected much more to the visa fee itself than to the NHS surcharge. The NHS can certainly do with my few hundred pounds. UKVI, on the other hand, is providing me a service - evaluating and certifying my right to be in the country - and doing so for a lot more than it costs. There is no difference in the manpower or infrastructure costs to issue a two-year versus a five-year visa, but there is a price difference.

    Anyway, as others have said, there's nothing you can do. Pay the surcharge or don't get a visa.
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