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    • JonathanB1981
    • By JonathanB1981 19th Mar 17, 12:20 PM
    • 5Posts
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    JonathanB1981
    HELP - Ways I could create 3rd bedroom
    • #1
    • 19th Mar 17, 12:20 PM
    HELP - Ways I could create 3rd bedroom 19th Mar 17 at 12:20 PM
    Hi Guys

    So I'm looking at buying this house. The area / set up are great BUT it's a two bed and I know over the next few years the family will grow and I will want another bedroom, maybe a 2nd five years down the track. I honestly can't find any decent three beds in price range in an area i'd want to live so am looking at the possibility of extensions etc. The property has already been extended / widened on three different occasions from what I can see. What I am wondering is how I could create an extra bedroom, working around the challenges created by what has already been done and either extending the first floor or converting the loft. Now normally of course I'd consult a builder and WILL but I'm just throwing it out there to you guys to see if you can spot any obvious problems with the scenarios i'm imagining (as I'm a complete novice!). Any indications as to pricing would also be helpful. Floorplan and pic of back of house for reference:

    NB As a new poster I'm unable to post links so you'll have copy and paste...
    Floorplan

    flickr.com/photos/37072533@N05/33143959600/in/dateposted-public/

    Back Of House

    flickr.com/photos/37072533@N05/33399065201/in/dateposted-public/

    Scenario 1

    Lengthen first floor extension over kitchen to end of building. Make bathroom more compact (but longer) with space on the left side for a corridor and add an extra bedroom at the end. Could you do this? I'm unsure as they've removed the original kitchen wall below when they've widened the kitchen - might still be possible I guess...

    Scenario 2

    Dormer loft conversion. Add bedroom and shower room (ideally) upstairs in loft space. Problems I imagine...cost (!), chimney stacks on either sidee obviously limit space and property is on a busy road meaning access might be difficult.

    Any suggestions / ideas / help much appreciated and if you think i'm wasting my time (for whatever reason - please feel free to tell me (as long as you also tell me why!).

    Many Thanks
Page 1
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 19th Mar 17, 1:52 PM
    • 23,184 Posts
    • 65,100 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #2
    • 19th Mar 17, 1:52 PM
    • #2
    • 19th Mar 17, 1:52 PM
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/37072533@N05/33143959600/in/dateposted-public

    You have to be careful about overdeveloping the property. Unless this is in London, you're unlikely to see any return on the investment as the cost of extending is more than the value added. People also expect parking and the downstairs living space to reflect the bedroom space for a family.

    Looking at the picture, my first thought is that the pitch of the roof doesn't look high enough for a loft conversion.

    You don't have to stay in the first house you buy.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 19th Mar 17, 3:07 PM
    • 1,088 Posts
    • 1,615 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #3
    • 19th Mar 17, 3:07 PM
    • #3
    • 19th Mar 17, 3:07 PM
    Scenario 1

    Lengthen first floor extension over kitchen to end of building. Make bathroom more compact (but longer) with space on the left side for a corridor and add an extra bedroom at the end. Could you do this? I'm unsure as they've removed the original kitchen wall below when they've widened the kitchen - might still be possible I guess...
    Originally posted by JonathanB1981
    Chances are, the foundations would be insufficient for a second floor and be compliant with current building regs. There are options and alternatives, and one I've seen in the neighbourhood was drive in some pilings and then support the first floor extension on a steel framework.

    In London, the fashion is to dig down, but this is starting to fall out of favour with the planning depts and is a high risk development. http://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/finchley-family-left-homeless-after-bodged-building-work-causes-house-to-collapse-a3193121.html
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • JonathanB1981
    • By JonathanB1981 20th Mar 17, 12:32 AM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    JonathanB1981
    • #4
    • 20th Mar 17, 12:32 AM
    • #4
    • 20th Mar 17, 12:32 AM
    You have to be careful about overdeveloping the property. Unless this is in London, you're unlikely to see any return on the investment as the cost of extending is more than the value added. People also expect parking and the downstairs living space to reflect the bedroom space for a family.
    It's Cambridge so really not far off the same affordability issues of London. Downstairs space is very reasonable for a 3 bed in a central location such as this. Parking is however a major issue...

    Looking at the picture, my first thought is that the pitch of the roof doesn't look high enough for a loft conversion.
    Yup I had feared that.

    You don't have to stay in the first house you buy
    Very true and I suppose a big part of this is me assessing how long this property will fit my needs.
    • JonathanB1981
    • By JonathanB1981 20th Mar 17, 12:36 AM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    JonathanB1981
    • #5
    • 20th Mar 17, 12:36 AM
    • #5
    • 20th Mar 17, 12:36 AM
    Chances are, the foundations would be insufficient for a second floor and be compliant with current building regs.
    Yes, you are most likely right. I am basing my ideas on what I have seen from other Victorian terraces where they often have extended over the original dog leg. But I guess a lot of them would have done that when the original extension was being done. Guess I'd need to consult a builder on that one.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 20th Mar 17, 8:30 AM
    • 35,140 Posts
    • 148,287 Thanks
    silvercar
    • #6
    • 20th Mar 17, 8:30 AM
    • #6
    • 20th Mar 17, 8:30 AM
    That room marked 'snug' only appears to have a window into the dining room and no direct natural light.
    • JonathanB1981
    • By JonathanB1981 20th Mar 17, 5:19 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    JonathanB1981
    • #7
    • 20th Mar 17, 5:19 PM
    • #7
    • 20th Mar 17, 5:19 PM
    That room marked 'snug' only appears to have a window into the dining room and no direct natural light.
    Yes, one of my other major gripes with the property. Who on f*****g earth commits to an extension that will basically void one existing room and doesn't follow through and sort it out by either knocking it through into the lounge or knocking through both kitchen and lounge walls? Someone who ran out of money I guess! Don't worry I will ream them over that if I decide to offer.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 21st Mar 17, 12:08 AM
    • 1,088 Posts
    • 1,615 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #8
    • 21st Mar 17, 12:08 AM
    • #8
    • 21st Mar 17, 12:08 AM
    In all probability, the internal wall between the 'snug' and lounge is structural - In which case, it is not as simple as "just knocking through". It would require the input from a structural engineer, a substantial RSJ, and possibly underpinning of the foundations. The same will be required if the wall between the snug & kitchen were to be removed.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • JonathanB1981
    • By JonathanB1981 21st Mar 17, 4:56 AM
    • 5 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    JonathanB1981
    • #9
    • 21st Mar 17, 4:56 AM
    • #9
    • 21st Mar 17, 4:56 AM
    In all probability, the internal wall between the 'snug' and lounge is structural - In which case, it is not as simple as "just knocking through". It would require the input from a structural engineer, a substantial RSJ, and possibly underpinning of the foundations. The same will be required if the wall between the snug & kitchen were to be removed.
    I found the floor plans from a property a few doors down who have done exactly the same thing but have actually completed the work.

    flickr.com/photos/37072533@N05/33505602116/in/dateposted-public/

    Both will require an RSJ as you rightly pointed out. Any idea ballpark what sort of cost you'd be looking at here? I've got a friend who runs a construction company that I'm trying to get hold of but any ideas you may have would be appreciated.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 21st Mar 17, 8:07 AM
    • 35,140 Posts
    • 148,287 Thanks
    silvercar
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/37072533@N05/33505602116/in/dateposted-public/
    Last edited by silvercar; 21-03-2017 at 8:09 AM.
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