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  • FIRST POST
    • alladin
    • By alladin 18th Mar 17, 3:00 PM
    • 21Posts
    • 9Thanks
    alladin
    Double-glazed replacement wood sash-windows
    • #1
    • 18th Mar 17, 3:00 PM
    Double-glazed replacement wood sash-windows 18th Mar 17 at 3:00 PM
    Hi,

    We've recently bought a property and knew we'd need to replace the windows, unfortunately we didn't realise it'll need to happen so soon.

    We have old wooden sash single glazed windows some of which have hairline cracks or the frames have gaps. I've looked at all options; casement windows, UpVC sash but decided to go with hardwood double glazing sash replacement as that's the only option which does not require ripping out the existing wooden fixtures. I don't live in a conservation area but I want to keep the original features.

    The quote I've been given is £730 per window in Kiln dried Mahogany double glazing including horns (like for like). The quote is irrespective of the size of the window as apparently the price is more about the labour rather than the materials. I have 22 windows, of which 3 are small .5m (w) 1m (h). Extra for locks, paint and vertical bars.

    I don't mind paying the money as long as I'm getting my money's worth. Question is, am I getting my money's worth? I don't know how to measure this as none of the site give pricing. Comparing it with other quotes I've received it not exactly the same as everyone uses different materials and they all feel their material is better suited.

    I've read that oak is the best and having sound proofing windows is advisable. But is this worth it, the windows don't face the main road however I does retain heat better than double glazing.

    If anyone has experience this, what would you advise? Should I be looking for companies who use oak? Would spending extra £90 on sound proofing be worth while? Are the prices realistic bearing in mind I live in Cardiff.

    thank you in advance.
Page 1
    • Private Church
    • By Private Church 18th Mar 17, 6:39 PM
    • 57 Posts
    • 112 Thanks
    Private Church
    • #2
    • 18th Mar 17, 6:39 PM
    • #2
    • 18th Mar 17, 6:39 PM
    Hi,



    decided to go with hardwood double glazing sash replacement as that's the only option which does not require ripping out the existing wooden fixtures. I don't live in a conservation area but I want to keep the original features.
    Originally posted by alladin
    Using the original boxes and replacing only the sashes is ok as long as the boxes are in tip top condition otherwise in a few years time you will have rotten boxframes with nice sashes in them. Also worth noting because of the increased weight of the glass you will need longer ,heavier weights so whoever makes the sashes needs to work out if there is enough room/height in the boxes to take the extra weight.

    The quote I've been given is £730 per window in Kiln dried Mahogany double glazing including horns (like for like). The quote is irrespective of the size of the window as apparently the price is more about the labour rather than the materials. I have 22 windows, of which 3 are small .5m (w) 1m (h). Extra for locks, paint and vertical bars.
    "Kiln dried mahogany" is a generic name so without knowing what species of timber and what type of double glazing you would be getting its difficult to tell if its value for money. One thing to remember is there's no point in fitting double glazing if you don't have the draught proofing carried out at the same time..



    I've read that oak is the best and having sound proofing windows is advisable. But is this worth it, the windows don't face the main road however I does retain heat better than double glazing.
    No point using Oak to be honest as its hugely expensive and will certainly outlast the boxframes. Also its difficult to paint due to tanic acid in the timber.

    If anyone has experience this, what would you advise? Should I be looking for companies who use oak? Would spending extra £90 on sound proofing be worth while? Are the prices realistic bearing in mind I live in Cardiff.
    What do they class as soundproofing? If its basically fitting draught strips then it will help the acoustics a little but better for thermal value so should be done as a matter of coarse when replacing the sashes and is as simple as routing a groove in the sashes and fitting weatherstrips which should be very cheap per window.

    Can you post the actual wording from the quote word for word?.
    Last edited by Private Church; 18-03-2017 at 6:57 PM.
    • RobinsonE
    • By RobinsonE 21st Mar 17, 2:50 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    RobinsonE
    • #3
    • 21st Mar 17, 2:50 PM
    • #3
    • 21st Mar 17, 2:50 PM
    I would recommend Accoya wood. It is guaranteed against rot for 50 years.

    I would expect most companies to carry out draught proofing at the same time as installing new windows. If they don't I would definitely recommend getting this done - it will save you money in the long term on heating costs and makes your home nicer to live in!

    I would say the prices look quite cheap to me, but it might be due to the hidden extras which are normally included in the price (locks, paint, draught proofing...).
    • Private Church
    • By Private Church 21st Mar 17, 7:58 PM
    • 57 Posts
    • 112 Thanks
    Private Church
    • #4
    • 21st Mar 17, 7:58 PM
    • #4
    • 21st Mar 17, 7:58 PM
    I would recommend Accoya wood. It is guaranteed against rot for 50 years.
    Originally posted by RobinsonE
    Not sure if its correct but I was told that Accoya only gives a long warranty if you go on one of their training courses. Its also hugely expensive and costs as much as European Oak so why not use Oak. Its very good for bi fold doors because it doesn't expand in the Winter months which can be a real pain with bi-fold doors. The downsides are its very,very expensive,you can only use certain glues when using it and any fixing must me stainless steel. The reason its hugely expensive is because only 2 companies have the licence to import it into the UK so they keep the price high by restricting supply. At the end of the day its a cheap pine timber vacuum pressure treated and then sold at a huge premium and I really question why no other companies are allowed to import it which would prevent these companies from fixing the prices. So companies nationwide have to buy it from 2 companies and they set the price for the whole country. Other timber importers are developing similar products which should bring the prices down to a realistic level.

    Its also worth pointing out they claim its eco friendly because its actually Radiata pine but when I looked they harvest the trees in New Zealand and transport the timber half way round the world to Holland where they put it in a vacuum and take out all the moisture ,then impregnate it with a form of acetic acid and then transport it all over the world so I do question how enviromentally friendly it really is.



    I would say the prices look quite cheap to me, but it might be due to the hidden extras which are normally included in the price (locks, paint, draught proofing...).
    I agree with this and it seems strange to me that a company would price the job to fit double glazed sashes but charge draught proofing as an optional extra..
    Last edited by Private Church; 21-03-2017 at 8:03 PM.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 21st Mar 17, 11:50 PM
    • 952 Posts
    • 1,478 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #5
    • 21st Mar 17, 11:50 PM
    • #5
    • 21st Mar 17, 11:50 PM
    Its also worth pointing out they claim its eco friendly because its actually Radiata pine but when I looked they harvest the trees in New Zealand and transport the timber half way round the world to Holland
    Originally posted by Private Church
    It is also grown in many countries across the world where it has displaced native woodlands to the detriment of the local ecology - In a few areas (including New Zealand), it is considered an invasive weed by some.
    So many cats, so few good recipes.

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