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  • FIRST POST
    • t33
    • By t33 18th Mar 17, 11:22 AM
    • 20Posts
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    t33
    Possible rewire and effects
    • #1
    • 18th Mar 17, 11:22 AM
    Possible rewire and effects 18th Mar 17 at 11:22 AM
    Hi

    I am keen on a flat and before making an offer want to see what disruption I might be in for.

    It is a ground floor flat of a 30s tenament (I'm in Scotland) and wood flooring throughout. In the Home Report it says 'some old wiring observed' and to get it cheched. But gives no further information. I know I can ask the seller but the property market in Edinburgh is 'hot' at present and very competitive and have been told that they just want to sell asap, so risk losing the property if I delay too much.

    The flat has a partial cellar (not sure of extent, but it is a crouching storage type thing below entrance hall and has a light). The power sockets in the flat are in the skirting but look modern two plug white with rockers. The ceiling lighting is modern and the pendant wiring looks newish. Not sure of any further info that might give a clue, though there has been a renovation to the kitchen/utility about 5 years ago and has modern looking electicals. The consumer unit IIRC is a modernish sort, I am seeing it again next week so this is on my list to double check - it was not picked out as an issue on the Home Report.

    As the floors are in excellent condition I'm wondering what a partial rewire or full one might cause as far as damage/disruption to floors and walls is concerned. I do have time to get it done before moving in I think.

    Thanks for any guidance you can give. I know its a tough question with so little info.

    Thank you.
    Last edited by t33; 18-03-2017 at 11:28 AM.
Page 1
    • societys child
    • By societys child 18th Mar 17, 11:32 AM
    • 4,087 Posts
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    societys child
    • #2
    • 18th Mar 17, 11:32 AM
    • #2
    • 18th Mar 17, 11:32 AM
    'some old wiring observed'
    Doesn't give you much to go on does it and doesn't necessarily mean it's unsafe.

    What's meant by old wiring, how old, where, what, have you asked the surveyor? Sounds like the usual back-covering.
    If worried, get it checked.

    • Risteard
    • By Risteard 18th Mar 17, 4:28 PM
    • 580 Posts
    • 174 Thanks
    Risteard
    • #3
    • 18th Mar 17, 4:28 PM
    • #3
    • 18th Mar 17, 4:28 PM
    The only way to ascertain the condition of the wiring is to have a periodic inspection carried out. You will then receive an Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR). Home surveyors are not competent to inspect electrical installations and therefore they don't and are non-commital on its suitability and safety. You need an electrical contractor for this - look on the NICEIC website (www.niceic.com) for an NICEIC Approved Contractor.
    • t33
    • By t33 18th Mar 17, 8:24 PM
    • 20 Posts
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    t33
    • #4
    • 18th Mar 17, 8:24 PM
    • #4
    • 18th Mar 17, 8:24 PM
    Doesn't give you much to go on does it and doesn't necessarily mean it's unsafe.

    What's meant by old wiring, how old, where, what, have you asked the surveyor? Sounds like the usual back-covering.
    If worried, get it checked.
    Originally posted by societys child
    Indeed those are my questions as well. In Scotland the seller is obliged to get a survey (called a home report) that is available to all potential buyers. This is all you have to go on especially in a strong sellers market. I'd like to have the option to get a more thorough survey or inspection, but if a property is desirable it is sold within a couple of weeks of going on the market. So knowing more beforehand is impossible.

    I understand well the only way to know what the potential issues are and what needs to be done to resolve same is to get a professional inspection and report. This, however, is not possible in the current situation.

    Given the worst case scenario of a full rewire, is it predictable what the damage will be to walls/floors or is it very dependent on a case by case basis? Last time I had a full rewire done was many years ago and ended up with cuts through floorboards in places and lots of plastering to be done on new sockeets, but ceiling fixture and light switches were not affected at all.

    Not an enviable situation as I don't like buying half-blind, but it seems the majority here do just that.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 18th Mar 17, 9:52 PM
    • 1,047 Posts
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    FreeBear
    • #5
    • 18th Mar 17, 9:52 PM
    • #5
    • 18th Mar 17, 9:52 PM
    You say it is a 1930s property with fairly modern looking sockets & light fittings - This would indicate that it has been rewired at some stage in its lifetime. There is a very good chance that the floorboards have been cut when the rewire was done. Should you want it done again and are happy with the location of the sockets, disruption will be minimal.

    That said, you'd probably want to add a few more sockets in each room and lift them further off the ground - This would entail a bit of mess chasing the walls and lifting a few more floorboards. With modern tools, cutting floorboards & chasing walls is a breeze.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • t33
    • By t33 19th Mar 17, 11:25 AM
    • 20 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    t33
    • #6
    • 19th Mar 17, 11:25 AM
    • #6
    • 19th Mar 17, 11:25 AM
    Thanks FreeBear that's useful info, I will be checking on current sockets and whether they are adequate for the future and also look for any floorboard cuts that are there already.

    If some rewiring is required and/or extra sockets up the walls, which workmen do what things. Do electricians lift the boards and do the chasing for instance and then you have to get someone in to replaster and skim? As a general rule? Is it best after checking and work needs to be done to get a building contractor who can do the whole thing?

    Cheers
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 19th Mar 17, 3:12 PM
    • 1,047 Posts
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    FreeBear
    • #7
    • 19th Mar 17, 3:12 PM
    • #7
    • 19th Mar 17, 3:12 PM
    A competent electrician is capable of lifting boards and chasing walls. A few can even do a half decent job of making good on the plaster. That said, I have seen one job where they used expanding foam to fill the chase (there is a reason it is called Bodging Foam).

    You don't need a general building contractor in to do the job - Just get a few quotes & recommendations for a decent electrician.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
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