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  • FIRST POST
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 17th Mar 17, 8:00 PM
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    NeilCr
    Buying a houseboat
    • #1
    • 17th Mar 17, 8:00 PM
    Buying a houseboat 17th Mar 17 at 8:00 PM
    I am vaguely thinking of moving

    During a search of available properties I came across a new houseboat with a permanent mooring at my local marina. And very nice it is too. 60 ft long - tastefully decorated - a bit of a man vpcave - big telly, drinks fridge etc

    I've never thought of living on a houseboat before but I can see the attractions. I'm aware of some of the downsides - mooring fees, insurance, licence, maintenance etc. I don't need that much space - my best friend reckons I could live in a hotel room. I don't come with much baggage - it's me and my cat really

    Internet and Sky Sports are important to me. Mid 60s now and like my days in front of the telly watching cricket, rugby, golf etc. The marina has wi fi - I've asked about provision for TV

    Just wondered if anyone with experience could comment on the pros and cons. It may well not happen but it's piqued my interest
Page 2
    • boliston
    • By boliston 18th Mar 17, 11:42 AM
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    boliston
    I would imagine the cost of living in a flat vs a boat would be FAR more for the boat.

    I was looking recently at bristol property and a houseboat came up at 165k which is comparable with some of bristol's flats but I would imagine the running costs would be high and the boat would have a limited lifespan

    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-56022298.html
    • GDB2222
    • By GDB2222 18th Mar 17, 11:43 AM
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    GDB2222
    This could be fine, PROVIDING you are paying boat prices for the boat and not house prices.

    A boat has a certain value, but stick it on a residential mooring and people start comparing it with a house. Sure, you can live there. The big problem is that you can get kicked off the mooring, and then all you have is the boat.

    Even in the meantime, you have to pay to rent the mooring and any other fees the marina feels like imposing. Until they decide to fill it all in and build houses on the site.

    You're probably okay if you are buying the boat cheaply enough, and not as in boliston's post above.
    Last edited by GDB2222; 18-03-2017 at 11:46 AM.
    No reliance should be placed on the above! Absolutely none, do you hear?
    • G_M
    • By G_M 18th Mar 17, 11:49 AM
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    G_M
    On the coast!

    Not sure I fancy travelling on it anyway, to be honest
    Originally posted by NeilCr
    So it's not a narrowboat?

    There are vast differences both in the boat type, and the sorts of considerations to take into account between a (liveaboard) narrowboat and a (liveaboard) coastal yacht!

    The websites I linked earlier are applicable to narrowboats on the canals (hence my attempts to drag blood from a stone). There are other sources of information more appropriate to yachts/cruisers.
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 18th Mar 17, 11:55 AM
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    NeilCr
    Sorry G_M. Not trying to be difficult. As I said I am new to this

    It's a narrowboat on a residential mooring on a marina on the coast

    The boat is brand new.

    I appreciate the comments about costs but, financially, it wouldn't be a problem for me. I am on my own with no children or family to take into account. My partner is independent

    The marina, itself, will not be filled in for housing - that's for sure!
    • ProDave
    • By ProDave 18th Mar 17, 1:44 PM
    • 196 Posts
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    ProDave
    Sorry G_M. Not trying to be difficult. As I said I am new to this

    It's a narrowboat on a residential mooring on a marina on the coast

    The boat is brand new.

    I appreciate the comments about costs but, financially, it wouldn't be a problem for me. I am on my own with no children or family to take into account. My partner is independent

    The marina, itself, will not be filled in for housing - that's for sure!
    Originally posted by NeilCr
    That's a very odd situation. A narrowboat is generally not a sea going vessel (though some do take the risk and do short coastal passages e.g along the Bristol channel for instance) Is it a marina on the end of a river or canal so you have some inland cruisng available if you so wish?

    Buying a NEW narrowboat only guarantees it's value is going to go down. they don't last forever and will need repairs and maintenance, and as they get older their value drops. Buying a good old one, will likely give you less depreciation.

    What are the toilet arrangements? Porta potti (self emptyiong) proper lo with a holding tank (have to pay for a pump out) or nothing, and a march to the marina shore facilities? All things to consider on a boat.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 18th Mar 17, 1:54 PM
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    AnotherJoe
    Does the marina connect to the canal network?
    If not, then as said, that is a very unusual situation and its really just a house substitute but resale might be problematic and I'd prefer to live in a nearby flat if you like the buzz of this place, which would appreciate in value unlike a boat.
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 18th Mar 17, 6:12 PM
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    NeilCr
    Here you go then

    https://www.premierhouseboats.co.uk/fh33

    Flats on the marina are out of my price range. Money isn't a big worry and I am very unlikely to want to go travelling on it
    • ProDave
    • By ProDave 18th Mar 17, 6:29 PM
    • 196 Posts
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    ProDave
    So the boat is in Ramsgate?

    Marina details http://www.portoframsgate.co.uk/royal-harbour-marina/201718-fees-and-charges/

    Likely to cost you £6000 p.a. to berth that there, plus electricity etc. No mention of any residential moorings in that marina?
    Last edited by ProDave; 18-03-2017 at 6:45 PM.
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 18th Mar 17, 6:32 PM
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    NeilCr
    So the boat is ion Ramsgate?

    Marina details http://www.portoframsgate.co.uk/royal-harbour-marina/201718-fees-and-charges/

    Likely to cost you £6000 p.a. to berth that there, plus electricity etc. No mention of any residential moorings in that marina?
    Originally posted by ProDave
    Yep

    I know the cost. Have an email in to the harbourmaster to find out more details about how it works/residential moorings etc
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 18th Mar 17, 6:44 PM
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    AnotherJoe
    Here you go then

    https://www.premierhouseboats.co.uk/fh33

    Flats on the marina are out of my price range. Money isn't a big worry and I am very unlikely to want to go travelling on it
    Originally posted by NeilCr
    Well practically speaking you couldn't go travelling on it anyway.

    Personally Id rather live on land as I'd be getting all the disadvantages of a boat (needs much more maintenance, depreciates, difficult to sell, tied to the harbor fees so if they put them up what will you do*) with few of the benefits, eg cant just up anchor and drive away for a change of scenery.

    I think you'll have to work out what your financial position will be in say 10-15 years time, assume you can get say £100k for this boat which cost £150k (whereas a flat bought for £150k might easily be £200k in 10-15 years) , add in say 10% increase in mooring fees every year and see how that works with what you perceive the benefits of living in that location would be and what you could do in 10-15 years time.

    Also, how secure are you? Suppose you are given a years notice to move because they are going upmarket and bringing in superyachts?

    Maybe you'd have a great 10-15 years and then move to a much cheaper flat ina cheaper area and regard it as worthwhilel

    Of course, you might also look elsewhere. This is the SE , by the sea, obviously expensive. have you looked elsewhere in the country where there might be a similar vibe but much cheaper?


    * the friend i referred to was moored in a marina when a new manager came in. Cost went up, facilities down, so he drove off to a different marina! You wouldn't really be able to do that.
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 18th Mar 17, 6:51 PM
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    NeilCr
    Thanks AnotherJoe

    Just the sort of feedback I was looking for

    I am financially secure enough to take that sort of hit. I'd have to research how Ramsgate marina works but I've lived down here for nearly 10 years and have heard little (if no) adverse comment. I take the point re being kicked off but that's a conversation to have with the harbourmaster and a judgement call on my behalf

    Elsewhere isn't an alternative. My partner lives here - a lot of my friends live here - and I love it in Ramsgate

    And it could be a lot of fun for some of my later years!
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 18th Mar 17, 7:07 PM
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    AnotherJoe
    The boat looks nice and any boat would suit someone who as you said "lives out of a suitcase" - definitely not for hoarders LOL.

    Surprised though you can't afford a flat if you can afford to take a hit when you sell plus the very high harbour fees. 10 years thats say £50k house loss plus maybe £100k maintenance and fees taking inflation into account (which i feel confident would be much higher for marina fees than general UK CPI). If you can afford £150k upfront plus £150k over ten years for a boat, cant you afford a flat?

    Look up RIghtmove property 54849169 I dont see to be able to post a link (flat on the harbour for £190k)
    Last edited by AnotherJoe; 18-03-2017 at 7:11 PM.
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 18th Mar 17, 7:15 PM
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    NeilCr
    Sorry. Can't open that URL. Crossed post!

    Having lived in a flat I know just how high the service charges are - it ain't just £190k! And there are neighbour/can I have an animal etc issues.. I've had a good look at the flats in the area too. What looks good on paper! . What I should have said earlier, perhaps, was that the sort of flat I'd fancy wasn't in my price range - ignoring the sort of service charges payable. To be honest, in my situation, £150k up front is a whole lot different to £190k right now

    I guess, in the end, it's a "should I go for something completely different" or stick with what I have. Maybe something about having a glass of wine on a boat on a marina? And yep I know there is some dreaming going on!

    I really appreciate your input. Thanks!
    Last edited by NeilCr; 18-03-2017 at 8:29 PM.
    • GDB2222
    • By GDB2222 18th Mar 17, 7:45 PM
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    GDB2222
    Hi Neil. The boat you are considering is £150k. These people will sell you a bespoke 60ft boat for £108k. I have no way of comparing the quality of the two boats, but you are paying 40% more for the one in Ramsgate marina. Why?

    What's to stop you buying any boat and mooring it in the marina? Looks like you can get the same result for far less money that way.

    I hear that you are financially secure, but there's no sense in wasting money.
    No reliance should be placed on the above! Absolutely none, do you hear?
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 18th Mar 17, 7:49 PM
    • 904 Posts
    • 958 Thanks
    NeilCr
    Hi Neil. The boat you are considering is £150k. These people will sell you a bespoke 60ft boat for £108k. I have no way of comparing the quality of the two boats, but you are paying 40% more for the one in Ramsgate marina. Why?

    What's to stop you buying any boat and mooring it in the marina? Looks like you can get the same result for far less money that way.

    I hear that you are financially secure, but there's no sense in wasting money.
    Originally posted by GDB2222
    Thanks!

    Sorry to be dumb but which people.

    Very open to that if a residential mooring is available. Another question for the harbourmaster/whoever!
    • GDB2222
    • By GDB2222 18th Mar 17, 8:13 PM
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    GDB2222
    Thanks!

    Sorry to be dumb but which people.

    Very open to that if a residential mooring is available. Another question for the harbourmaster/whoever!
    Originally posted by NeilCr
    Sorry! I forgot to post the link.

    http://www.aquanarrowboats.co.uk/new-boat-sales/

    But that's just the first google link I clicked on.
    No reliance should be placed on the above! Absolutely none, do you hear?
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 18th Mar 17, 8:21 PM
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    NeilCr
    Sorry! I forgot to post the link.

    http://www.aquanarrowboats.co.uk/new-boat-sales/

    But that's just the first google link I clicked on.
    Originally posted by GDB2222
    Thanks

    Glad it wasn't me!

    Have to think how to get it to Ramsgate too - assuming a mooring was available!
    Last edited by NeilCr; 18-03-2017 at 8:30 PM.
    • ProDave
    • By ProDave 18th Mar 17, 9:11 PM
    • 196 Posts
    • 257 Thanks
    ProDave
    Thanks

    Glad it wasn't me!

    Have to think how to get it to Ramsgate too - assuming a mooring was available!
    Originally posted by NeilCr
    On the back of a low loader and offloaded with a crane, that's how narrowboats are often moved around the country.
    • candygirl
    • By candygirl 19th Mar 17, 3:48 PM
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    candygirl
    Good luck with it all Neil.I have zero knowledge about boats, but admire people, who are willing to take adventurous steps in life.As GERS said, HARDUPHESTER has just bought a canal boat to live on.If you click on her profile name, you can follow her blog It's really good
    "You can't stop the waves, but you can learn to surf"

    (Kabat-Zinn 2004)
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 19th Mar 17, 3:54 PM
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    lincroft1710
    "Widebeam narrowboat" is an oxymoron.

    £150K, 60 x 12, only 1 cabin and 1 head. Does not seem particularly good value and £6K pa mooring fee. Stay there 10 yrs and there's a minimum of £60K for allowing you to put 2 ropes around mooring posts.
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