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  • FIRST POST
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 17th Mar 17, 8:00 PM
    • 856Posts
    • 891Thanks
    NeilCr
    Buying a houseboat
    • #1
    • 17th Mar 17, 8:00 PM
    Buying a houseboat 17th Mar 17 at 8:00 PM
    I am vaguely thinking of moving

    During a search of available properties I came across a new houseboat with a permanent mooring at my local marina. And very nice it is too. 60 ft long - tastefully decorated - a bit of a man vpcave - big telly, drinks fridge etc

    I've never thought of living on a houseboat before but I can see the attractions. I'm aware of some of the downsides - mooring fees, insurance, licence, maintenance etc. I don't need that much space - my best friend reckons I could live in a hotel room. I don't come with much baggage - it's me and my cat really

    Internet and Sky Sports are important to me. Mid 60s now and like my days in front of the telly watching cricket, rugby, golf etc. The marina has wi fi - I've asked about provision for TV

    Just wondered if anyone with experience could comment on the pros and cons. It may well not happen but it's piqued my interest
Page 1
    • G_M
    • By G_M 17th Mar 17, 8:10 PM
    • 40,113 Posts
    • 45,820 Thanks
    G_M
    • #2
    • 17th Mar 17, 8:10 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Mar 17, 8:10 PM
    'Permenant mooring' or 'residential mooring'? Very different. You can live on the latter, not the former.

    Do some research on waterways websites and forums.

    https://www.waterways.org.uk/boating/livingafloat/living_afloat

    https://www.watersidemooring.com/

    http://www.canaljunction.com/news/adrift-a-story-of-living-on-a-london-houseboat/2704

    https://livingonanarrowboat.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/21_Liveaboard_Narrowboat_Case_Studies.pdf

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Liveaboard-Guide-Living-Afloat-Waterways/dp/1408145553
    Last edited by G_M; 17-03-2017 at 8:18 PM.
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 17th Mar 17, 8:17 PM
    • 856 Posts
    • 891 Thanks
    NeilCr
    • #3
    • 17th Mar 17, 8:17 PM
    • #3
    • 17th Mar 17, 8:17 PM
    Residential mooring.

    Happy to do research (indeed have done some) but asking on here as it's a forum I use quite a lot and my experience is that you can get answers from many different sources
    • G_M
    • By G_M 17th Mar 17, 8:19 PM
    • 40,113 Posts
    • 45,820 Thanks
    G_M
    • #4
    • 17th Mar 17, 8:19 PM
    • #4
    • 17th Mar 17, 8:19 PM
    see edited links above
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 17th Mar 17, 9:37 PM
    • 9,411 Posts
    • 7,376 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    • #5
    • 17th Mar 17, 9:37 PM
    • #5
    • 17th Mar 17, 9:37 PM
    Get a proper marine survey on any boat you're seriously thinking of buying.
    • Prothet of Doom
    • By Prothet of Doom 17th Mar 17, 10:14 PM
    • 3,131 Posts
    • 3,775 Thanks
    Prothet of Doom
    • #6
    • 17th Mar 17, 10:14 PM
    • #6
    • 17th Mar 17, 10:14 PM
    During the week I rent a room in a house, next to a marina and river mooring. My landlords know a few of the permanent residents, and they are without doubt the happiest yet grubbiest people I've met.
    It's quite nice to be taken to the local pub by boat too. It's 1/2 mile as the crow flies, 3/4 mile by boat and 12 miles by road.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 17th Mar 17, 10:25 PM
    • 6,866 Posts
    • 7,302 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    • #7
    • 17th Mar 17, 10:25 PM
    • #7
    • 17th Mar 17, 10:25 PM
    I have a friend who lives on a narrowboat. 6 months of the year permanently moored up near Banbury in a marina, 6 months travelling around. I think he has to continue paying for his mooringsbtruoughbteh summer though or he'd lose them. I suspect when he gets to no longer be able to do the cruising he may pack it in.

    It started out of financial necessity but he likes the lifestyle now, kudos to him I've done a few weeks on the canals on holidays with friends, but locks and the like solo, I wouldn't fancy.
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 17th Mar 17, 10:37 PM
    • 59,187 Posts
    • 345,520 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    • #8
    • 17th Mar 17, 10:37 PM
    • #8
    • 17th Mar 17, 10:37 PM
    "At your age...." all it'd take is one trip to that beer fridge in early January, followed by missing your footing getting onto the bank to pop to the car for something and you're in Hospital with a broken leg, living in an odd place to access and nobody can work out how you can be sent home in a wheelchair with a broken leg when you live alone in a boat.

    In my opinion, it's not really an ideal long-term solution for somebody "getting on" who lives alone because something new will start to creak every day - and I'm not talking about the boat!
    • Mr.Generous
    • By Mr.Generous 17th Mar 17, 10:41 PM
    • 1,609 Posts
    • 2,404 Thanks
    Mr.Generous
    • #9
    • 17th Mar 17, 10:41 PM
    • #9
    • 17th Mar 17, 10:41 PM
    Whatever floats your boat. Go for it!
    • iammumtoone
    • By iammumtoone 17th Mar 17, 10:48 PM
    • 4,635 Posts
    • 9,791 Thanks
    iammumtoone
    Are you looking to buy or rent?

    Buy I would not recommend as pasturens new points out this will unlikely be able to be a permanent home and you will at some point have the hassle of having to sell it, maybe quickly at a loss depending on how your health needs are as you get older.

    Rent, go for it hopefully you have plenty of healthy years ahead of you so enjoy it. Still consider buying if you can afford to take a loss if the worse happens and you need to sell quick to move to a more suitable home.
    Sealed pot challenge ~ 10 #017
    Declutter 2017 items in 2017 - 78/2017

    • AFF8879
    • By AFF8879 18th Mar 17, 12:00 AM
    • 216 Posts
    • 508 Thanks
    AFF8879
    Buying a houseboat is not something to do on a whim (which is what it sounds like from your post)...not a glamorous lifestyle for sure, especially in the winter months it can get pretty torrid.

    You'd be much better off / more comfortable buying a small flat if possible. Especially given your age, there are large numbers of developments specifically for over 50s/55s/60s where you buy at a reduced rate.

    Houseboats depreciate in value like other vehicles, so it becomes extremely difficult to move back to land the longer you spend there. And as PasturesNew highlighted, I'm sure you're fit and healthy now but I would feel a bit vulnerable if I was single on a houseboat as I began to enter old age. Much rather have the warmth, accessibility and comfort of a nice cosy flat!
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 18th Mar 17, 6:05 AM
    • 856 Posts
    • 891 Thanks
    NeilCr
    Thanks everyone.

    I am looking to buy.

    Yes it's a whim at the moment but I'd never go into anything without doing a lot of research!

    I own a house so I may well stay were I am. For certain reasons (living on a communal estate) I am contemplating moving and this came up. The age thing could be a deciding factor - the points are well made. On the other hand it could be fun. And,you know, the breaking the leg issue could be a problem in flats and houses too

    Once again thanks. I appreciate all the comments
    • 3mph
    • By 3mph 18th Mar 17, 7:32 AM
    • 158 Posts
    • 173 Thanks
    3mph
    You do know that BOAT stands for "bung over another thousand" ?
    • Lioness Twinkletoes
    • By Lioness Twinkletoes 18th Mar 17, 9:07 AM
    • 1,054 Posts
    • 3,405 Thanks
    Lioness Twinkletoes
    This thread lead me to look at houseboats for sale and I have to say, I'd love one. Looking at spending about £2m though, so it'll have to wait until I've won the lottery!
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 18th Mar 17, 10:16 AM
    • 1,401 Posts
    • 3,499 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    On the other hand it could be fun. And,you know, the breaking the leg issue could be a problem in flats and houses too
    Originally posted by NeilCr
    Much easier to solve though, lifts, ramps etc. Newer builds have to be accessible by law, a houseboat doesn't!

    I understand the temptation though, can you upsticks and go on holiday in a houseboat though or does it have to stay where it is?
    • G_M
    • By G_M 18th Mar 17, 10:26 AM
    • 40,113 Posts
    • 45,820 Thanks
    G_M
    The term 'houseboat' generally refers to a static, floating 'house'.

    We seem here to be talking about the canal network, mostly used by 'narrowboats' (due to the width of the canals, and more importantly, the locks).

    On the wider canals (eg Grand Union), Dutch Barges can be used (they're about double the width of a narrowboat). And on the rivers/broads etc there are river boats (often glass fibre or wood rather than steel construction).

    I suspect here the OP is considering a liveaboad narrowboat on a canal. Which would be able to cruise as well as provide a permenat home.
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 18th Mar 17, 10:43 AM
    • 856 Posts
    • 891 Thanks
    NeilCr

    I suspect here the OP is considering a liveaboad narrowboat on a canal. Which would be able to cruise as well as provide a permenat home.
    Originally posted by G_M
    It's actually a 60 footer moored on my local marina. It is fully working, as I understand it.

    There is a good lifestyle by our marina - lots of bars, restaurants etc and buzzy. So yes it is tempting but I have to keep my sensible head on too
    Last edited by NeilCr; 18-03-2017 at 10:46 AM.
    • Gers
    • By Gers 18th Mar 17, 11:10 AM
    • 5,585 Posts
    • 32,091 Thanks
    Gers
    I am vaguely thinking of moving

    During a search of available properties I came across a new houseboat with a permanent mooring at my local marina. And very nice it is too. 60 ft long - tastefully decorated - a bit of a man vpcave - big telly, drinks fridge etc

    I've never thought of living on a houseboat before but I can see the attractions. I'm aware of some of the downsides - mooring fees, insurance, licence, maintenance etc. I don't need that much space - my best friend reckons I could live in a hotel room. I don't come with much baggage - it's me and my cat really

    Internet and Sky Sports are important to me. Mid 60s now and like my days in front of the telly watching cricket, rugby, golf etc. The marina has wi fi - I've asked about provision for TV

    Just wondered if anyone with experience could comment on the pros and cons. It may well not happen but it's piqued my interest
    Originally posted by NeilCr
    If you pop over to the Old Style board and search for HardupHester she'll be able to give you great information as her and her hubby have just bought one to live in full time.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 18th Mar 17, 11:30 AM
    • 40,113 Posts
    • 45,820 Thanks
    G_M
    Originally Posted by G_M

    I suspect here the OP is considering a liveaboad narrowboat on a canal. Which would be able to cruise as well as provide a permenat home.
    It's actually a 60 footer moored on my local marina. It is fully working, as I understand it.
    Originally posted by NeilCr
    And the marina is.... on the canal network? On the coast? On a river?

    Being a '60 footer' I imagine it's a narrowboat on a canal which you're considering using as a liveaboard..........
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 18th Mar 17, 11:34 AM
    • 856 Posts
    • 891 Thanks
    NeilCr
    And the marina is.... on the canal network? On the coast? On a river?

    Being a '60 footer' I imagine it's a narrowboat on a canal which you're considering using as a liveaboard..........
    Originally posted by G_M
    On the coast!

    Not sure I fancy travelling on it anyway, to be honest
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