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  • FIRST POST
    • Noob4now
    • By Noob4now 16th Mar 17, 10:26 PM
    • 12Posts
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    Noob4now
    Does 3 months in a job role make you highly experienced?
    • #1
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:26 PM
    Does 3 months in a job role make you highly experienced? 16th Mar 17 at 10:26 PM
    I am getting different stories from different people.

    When I was sacked for an alleged misconduct issue, the employment tribunal judge said I should have have known better then to make the decision i made because, according to the judge, I was 'highly experienced' in the job role after only being in it for 3 months. Needles to say I lost the tribunal but thats another story.

    When I apply for similar job roles and tell potential employers that I am 'highly experienced' in the job role after only doing it for 3 months, the ones that respond tell me that 3 months is hardly any time at all and not considered as 'highly experienced'.

    If the employers are right, that would make the judge wrong.

    Does 3 months in a job role make someone 'highly experienced' in that role?

    I get that you would gain some experience in the role during your 3 months, but cant see how that would make you highly experienced, especially when the minimum training for that role is 12 months.
Page 1
    • Masomnia
    • By Masomnia 16th Mar 17, 10:30 PM
    • 16,802 Posts
    • 36,986 Thanks
    Masomnia
    • #2
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:30 PM
    • #2
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:30 PM
    3 months working in a bank would be enough to know that you don't 'borrow' money from the till.

    So, it depends.

    Get over it and move on is my advice.
    “I could see that, if not actually disgruntled, he was far from being gruntled.” - P.G. Wodehouse
    • jobbingmusician
    • By jobbingmusician 16th Mar 17, 10:32 PM
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    jobbingmusician
    • #3
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:32 PM
    • #3
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:32 PM
    Generally I would agree with you. However, it does depend on the role. Someone with 3 months' experience in a burger bar might be the most experienced (non-managerial) employee there, so highly experienced.

    I do wonder what you are hoping to achieve with the answer to your question, though. I don't reckon your chances of challenging a remark by a tribunal judge.
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    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 16th Mar 17, 10:37 PM
    • 14,676 Posts
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    motorguy
    • #4
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:37 PM
    • #4
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:37 PM
    I am getting different stories from different people.

    When I was sacked for an alleged misconduct issue, the employment tribunal judge said I should have have known better then to make the decision i made because, according to the judge, I was 'highly experienced' in the job role after only being in it for 3 months. Needles to say I lost the tribunal but thats another story.

    When I apply for similar job roles and tell potential employers that I am 'highly experienced' in the job role after only doing it for 3 months, the ones that respond tell me that 3 months is hardly any time at all and not considered as 'highly experienced'.

    If the employers are right, that would make the judge wrong.

    Does 3 months in a job role make someone 'highly experienced' in that role?

    I get that you would gain some experience in the role during your 3 months, but cant see how that would make you highly experienced, especially when the minimum training for that role is 12 months.
    Originally posted by Noob4now
    I'm not sure what you want us to say here?

    3 months in pretty much any job doesnt make you "highly experienced" by any stretch of the imagination.

    If the judge said that in that context, then are you expecting to be able to appeal his decision on that point based on the fact that subsequently you've put highly experienced on your CV and not got jobs? Although i'm thinking maybe the fact you got sacked for gross misconduct from your previous job could be a factor....

    Maybe when they do tell you that you're not "highly experienced" you should tell them that the judge at the employment tribunal you were at because you were sacked for gross misconduct from your previous job said he thought you were "highly experienced" and thats why you lost the case?

    Maybe you could ask the judge for a reference?
    Regards

    Paul
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 16th Mar 17, 10:38 PM
    • 14,676 Posts
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    motorguy
    • #5
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:38 PM
    • #5
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:38 PM
    3 months working in a bank would be enough to know that you don't 'borrow' money from the till.

    So, it depends.

    Get over it and move on is my advice.
    Originally posted by Masomnia
    +1

    Likewise i'd say 3 months flipping burgers in McDonalds and you could be considered that highly experienced that you're ready for promotion to Chip Fryer.
    Regards

    Paul
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 16th Mar 17, 10:57 PM
    • 3,320 Posts
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    TELLIT01
    • #6
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:57 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:57 PM
    3 months doing a basic and repetitive job could certainly be long enough to be classed as experienced (define highly!), whereas 3 months from starting to train as a brain surgeon wouldn't be.
    • Mr.Generous
    • By Mr.Generous 16th Mar 17, 11:06 PM
    • 1,438 Posts
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    Mr.Generous
    • #7
    • 16th Mar 17, 11:06 PM
    • #7
    • 16th Mar 17, 11:06 PM
    I have plumbed quite a few sets of taps and would consider myself perfectly capable of doing it - highly experienced? maybe, its a subjective comment, perhaps an off the cuff remark. I have probably spent less than 40 working days changing taps in total. Each set doesn't take that long. If I applied to be a master plumber they would probably tell me to get stuffed, but if I left a set !!!!ing out water because I claimed I wasn't experienced enough to know better I suspect that I would be held to account. You need to explain a bit more about the job for peoples judgement to be anything more than a guess.
    • marliepanda
    • By marliepanda 17th Mar 17, 12:51 AM
    • 4,284 Posts
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    marliepanda
    • #8
    • 17th Mar 17, 12:51 AM
    • #8
    • 17th Mar 17, 12:51 AM
    Entirely depends what your alleged misconduct was.

    Somethings you'd be expected to know before you even set foot in the door (common sense)
    Some things you'd be expected to know after a couple of days to a week (the basics)
    After three months you'd probably have a good grasp of the day to day of the job and what you could and couldn't do.

    If you were sacked for gross misconduct after three months and the judge said you should have known better, well, should you?
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    • MataNui
    • By MataNui 17th Mar 17, 8:36 AM
    • 748 Posts
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    MataNui
    • #9
    • 17th Mar 17, 8:36 AM
    • #9
    • 17th Mar 17, 8:36 AM
    You are talking about different things. You dont get fired for misconduct for not doing the job perfectly. You get fired for stuff like ignoring company policy. They are not the same.

    I work in IT in a pretty specialist area. After 3 months you still know squat and wouldnt be expected to be proficient. If you mess up you wouldnt get sacked for it. Thats not misconduct. On the other hand we have VERY strict security and access policies. These are hammered into you from day one. They are so strict that a single transgression is considered Gross misconduct. After 3 months in the office you would indeed be 'highly experienced' at knowing what is and is not acceptable in that regard and the consequences of any lapses of judgment.
    • Noob4now
    • By Noob4now 17th Mar 17, 11:01 AM
    • 12 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Noob4now
    It was a manager's job which a new company that took over the business threw me into with no training, interview or assessment. There were no procedures in place for the issue i was sacked for; I used common sense and made a judgement call which they disagreed with. Their excuse was, youre a manager so you should have known what to do. The judge took it further and said i was a 'highly experienced' manager and should have known better. Neither of them could tell me how i should have known what to do, or how i should have known better, when there were no procedures in place and i wasnt trained!

    im not aiming to achieve anything here, just curious if 3 months would make someone 'highly experienced' and from the answers so far, it all depends on your job!

    Thanks for the replies and yes i am thinking of asking the judge for a reference seeing as he considers my job experience so highly
    • marliepanda
    • By marliepanda 17th Mar 17, 11:23 AM
    • 4,284 Posts
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    marliepanda
    You're still giving no information to help:

    Stealing, violence, using somebody else's password, swearing at a customer, intimidating a staff member, not letting someone have a toilet break, cash mishandling - all of these things would be something you would know fairly quickly.

    Something like taking an unusual route to solve a problem which was actually against company policy, wouldn't be. Promising something that was against company policy and costing them money, probably wouldn't be.

    You say you made a judgement call that they disagreed with. Did that cause danger or monetary loss? Was there anyone available for you to call of contact before that call was made? Was it urgent and needed to be acted on there and then or could you have waited to get higher up permission?

    Unless you give us some idea we have no clue whether the experience you had would be sufficient.
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    • Gavin83
    • By Gavin83 17th Mar 17, 11:37 AM
    • 4,132 Posts
    • 6,336 Thanks
    Gavin83
    It depends on the job. Some jobs are extremely basic and you could know everything you could about the role in 3 months. Some jobs you could do for a decade and still not know everything. I would say that in the majority of jobs you aren't 'highly experienced' after 3 months.

    However I think your taking the judge out of context and I'd dismiss any ideas of lodging an appeal based on this. I suspect what the judge was saying is that you were experienced enough to not make the mistake you did but with the tiny amount of information you've provided it's hard to say. Also something doesn't add up, if you'd only been working for the company for 3 months you can't take them to a tribunal anyway.

    Had you come here before people could have given you advice as to how solid your case was.
    • Mr.Generous
    • By Mr.Generous 17th Mar 17, 11:43 AM
    • 1,438 Posts
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    Mr.Generous
    This is going to drive you nuts unless you try and put it behind you and move on. The tribunal chair will be a judge, the other two members not necessarily. They will find in favour of your employer if the decision they took falls within the band of reasonable decisions a person might take when faced with the same situation. They don't necessarily agree with the decision. You may have only been in that particular job role for 3 months but how long working for the company? You were given that position for a reason and they - and you? - felt there was no need for training. It could be the best thing if you find a more suitable position, in five years who knows. Move on.
    • jonmoneybags
    • By jonmoneybags 17th Mar 17, 1:28 PM
    • 177 Posts
    • 123 Thanks
    jonmoneybags
    What did you do, forget to ask if they wanted fries with that.

    3 months, highly experienced...not in many jobs.
    • Andy L
    • By Andy L 17th Mar 17, 3:13 PM
    • 8,179 Posts
    • 6,373 Thanks
    Andy L
    +1

    Likewise i'd say 3 months flipping burgers in McDonalds and you could be considered that highly experienced that you're ready for promotion to Chip Fryer.
    Originally posted by motorguy
    You'd have to be quite the high-fryer to progress that quickly
    • neilio
    • By neilio 17th Mar 17, 3:31 PM
    • 214 Posts
    • 99 Thanks
    neilio
    Wow, people on these forums are always so quick to tell people to get over something and move on. This is a place for discussion and sharing experiences, ideas, or find an explanation for something. Don't be so dismissive, someone else might find this helpful in the future.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 17th Mar 17, 6:44 PM
    • 9,066 Posts
    • 6,895 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    Wow, people on these forums are always so quick to tell people to get over something and move on. This is a place for discussion and sharing experiences, ideas, or find an explanation for something. Don't be so dismissive, someone else might find this helpful in the future.
    Originally posted by neilio
    In this particular case telling the OP to get over it is the best advice. He lost the ET case, there is nothing he can do except move on with his life and look for another job.
    • Fireflyaway
    • By Fireflyaway 18th Mar 17, 8:46 AM
    • 806 Posts
    • 806 Thanks
    Fireflyaway
    I agree with the majority of posters that it depends on what the job is. Data entry might be mastered in a few weeks whereas a doctor would take years to become highly experienced. However could the judge have been referring to your overall career history not just this particular job? If you only worked for 3 months at company x but previously you had worked for 5 years in a similar role elsewhere, you could still be deemed highly experienced.
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