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    • Annie1960
    • By Annie1960 16th Mar 17, 8:29 PM
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    Annie1960
    Under-floor heating
    • #1
    • 16th Mar 17, 8:29 PM
    Under-floor heating 16th Mar 17 at 8:29 PM
    I'm wondering about what sort of heating to have in my kitchen. I've always had cold kitchens before as there has never been enough room for a table and chairs. My current kitchen is large, and I plan to have a table and chairs, so will need some heating.

    Could I have under-floor heating if I go for vinyl flooring?
Page 1
    • bouncydog1
    • By bouncydog1 17th Mar 17, 7:19 AM
    • 2,591 Posts
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    bouncydog1
    • #2
    • 17th Mar 17, 7:19 AM
    • #2
    • 17th Mar 17, 7:19 AM
    There is no reason why you shouldn't be able to have underfloor heating - it depends on how much you have in the budget. There is usually a maximum operating temperature given by the vinyl manufacturers so as long as your underfloor heating doesn't exceed this it would be o.k.

    Do bear in mind though that electric underfloor heating is not the cheapest to run and if you have a large area then it may not be able to heat it properly. It tends to give off a low heat so the floor is comfortable. We have it in our bathroom but also have a full size heated towel rail as the underfloor wouldn't be enough on its own. You will also need to ensure that you have insulation under the floor to stop the heat escaping downwards and also insulation in the ceiling to stop it escaping upwards.
    • ComicGeek
    • By ComicGeek 17th Mar 17, 7:50 AM
    • 143 Posts
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    ComicGeek
    • #3
    • 17th Mar 17, 7:50 AM
    • #3
    • 17th Mar 17, 7:50 AM
    There is no reason why you shouldn't be able to have underfloor heating - it depends on how much you have in the budget. There is usually a maximum operating temperature given by the vinyl manufacturers so as long as your underfloor heating doesn't exceed this it would be o.k.

    Do bear in mind though that electric underfloor heating is not the cheapest to run and if you have a large area then it may not be able to heat it properly. It tends to give off a low heat so the floor is comfortable. We have it in our bathroom but also have a full size heated towel rail as the underfloor wouldn't be enough on its own. You will also need to ensure that you have insulation under the floor to stop the heat escaping downwards and also insulation in the ceiling to stop it escaping upwards.
    Originally posted by bouncydog1
    Electric underfloor mats are relatively cheap to buy - we've just done 2 1-bedroom flats for supply cost of less than £1k, but expensive to run. Electric mats can provide up to 200w/m2 so have a high output - they struggle in bathrooms because of the limited floor area available, but work well in larger rooms.

    That 'low heat' works as radiation, so keeps you warm without the sometimes uncomfortable heat from radiators (which despite the name provide heat mainly by convection).

    You don't need insulation in the ceiling for it to work.
    • Annie1960
    • By Annie1960 17th Mar 17, 8:03 AM
    • 2,654 Posts
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    Annie1960
    • #4
    • 17th Mar 17, 8:03 AM
    • #4
    • 17th Mar 17, 8:03 AM
    There is no reason why you shouldn't be able to have underfloor heating - it depends on how much you have in the budget. There is usually a maximum operating temperature given by the vinyl manufacturers so as long as your underfloor heating doesn't exceed this it would be o.k.

    Do bear in mind though that electric underfloor heating is not the cheapest to run and if you have a large area then it may not be able to heat it properly. It tends to give off a low heat so the floor is comfortable. We have it in our bathroom but also have a full size heated towel rail as the underfloor wouldn't be enough on its own. You will also need to ensure that you have insulation under the floor to stop the heat escaping downwards and also insulation in the ceiling to stop it escaping upwards.
    Originally posted by bouncydog1
    It is a very large kitchen, the biggest I have ever had, 5.3 x 3.9 metres. I will be replacing the ceiling so could insulate it, and the floor is concrete.

    However, it sounds as though a radiator may be better.
    • ComicGeek
    • By ComicGeek 17th Mar 17, 8:08 AM
    • 143 Posts
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    ComicGeek
    • #5
    • 17th Mar 17, 8:08 AM
    • #5
    • 17th Mar 17, 8:08 AM
    Electric heating will be more comfortable heat output, but probably 3/4 times the cost of the radiator to run.

    Also depends on whether you have sufficient spare wall space to have radiators.
    • Annie1960
    • By Annie1960 17th Mar 17, 10:21 AM
    • 2,654 Posts
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    Annie1960
    • #6
    • 17th Mar 17, 10:21 AM
    • #6
    • 17th Mar 17, 10:21 AM
    Electric heating will be more comfortable heat output, but probably 3/4 times the cost of the radiator to run.

    Also depends on whether you have sufficient spare wall space to have radiators.
    Originally posted by ComicGeek

    The pipes are already there for a radiator as I had the old one taken off when I knocked through.
    • Rain Shadow
    • By Rain Shadow 17th Mar 17, 10:25 AM
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    Rain Shadow
    • #7
    • 17th Mar 17, 10:25 AM
    • #7
    • 17th Mar 17, 10:25 AM
    I have wet underfloor heating in a kitchen 3m x 9m and it is really good. It was installed as part of the build. I imagine it is an expensive retrofit.
    You can pick your friends and you can pick your nose but you can't pick your friend's nose.
    • DonnySaver
    • By DonnySaver 17th Mar 17, 10:28 AM
    • 397 Posts
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    DonnySaver
    • #8
    • 17th Mar 17, 10:28 AM
    • #8
    • 17th Mar 17, 10:28 AM
    We have underfloor heating in our kitchen. It's from WarmUp. It works very well at heating the entire kitchen. We've got a tiled floor and they can get cold on your feet. We do only have it on during the winter months though.
    • Annie1960
    • By Annie1960 17th Mar 17, 4:09 PM
    • 2,654 Posts
    • 1,484 Thanks
    Annie1960
    • #9
    • 17th Mar 17, 4:09 PM
    • #9
    • 17th Mar 17, 4:09 PM
    I have wet underfloor heating in a kitchen 3m x 9m and it is really good. It was installed as part of the build. I imagine it is an expensive retrofit.
    Originally posted by Rain Shadow
    What is wet underfloor heating, and how does it differ from dry?
    • Alex1983
    • By Alex1983 17th Mar 17, 4:34 PM
    • 270 Posts
    • 142 Thanks
    Alex1983
    Wet underfloor is ran off your central heating system
    • Ptolemyspuzzle
    • By Ptolemyspuzzle 20th Mar 17, 12:38 AM
    • 30 Posts
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    Ptolemyspuzzle
    Wet - imagine a bunch of hose pipes running under your floor. It's generally heated from a boiler (often gas) but sometimes from heat pumps. Since the water is generally heated by gas it's a lot cheaper than electric underfloor heating to run.

    Personally I prefer wet. I've had wet in 2 of my 3 past houses and it is (imo) the best thing ever. First house was concrete, so it was installed everywhere. Second house it is installed on the ground floor only, radiators upstairs. Nice efficient and effective heating. I'm currently looking at getting it installed into my new place. The other house had electric underfloor heating in the bathroom. It wasn't great to begin with, then it stopped working completely and I noticed a current running through the shower. I personally wouldn't bother with electric heating of any kind due to costs of running, the shower becoming electrified was enough to put me off for life.
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