Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Roy1234
    • By Roy1234 16th Mar 17, 8:00 AM
    • 92Posts
    • 12Thanks
    Roy1234
    What kind of survey for a 1995 House?
    • #1
    • 16th Mar 17, 8:00 AM
    What kind of survey for a 1995 House? 16th Mar 17 at 8:00 AM
    I'm in the process of buying a house built in 1995 by Wilcon Homes Midlands Ltd (now absorbed into one of the bigger house builders) and need to decide what level of survey to pay for.

    This is a pretty new house by my standards; most others I've had have been 1930s, and I'm aware of the general advice that the older the house the greater the need for a Full Structural Survey.

    I've spoken with a local who has lived on the estate since construction, and who had only praise for their house. But equally, it's quite easy to find stories of problems & haters of building standards etc where newer housing is concerned.

    Would a full structural survey be over the top for something 22 years old, or should I be just as wary as of an old house?
Page 1
    • MEM62
    • By MEM62 16th Mar 17, 10:44 AM
    • 1,221 Posts
    • 869 Thanks
    MEM62
    • #2
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:44 AM
    • #2
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:44 AM
    The age of the house should not dictate your decision. Since when has age been the only factor in a house having issues?

    Your tolerance for risk is the deciding factor. If you have the basic survey done this is little more than a valuation survey. If you are happy with that then all well and good. A full structural survey brings better peace of mind as any serious issues are more likely to be identified and, even of these only come to light at a later stage, you have coverage under the surveyors indemnity insurance.

    You pay your money and take your choice.
    • martinsurrey
    • By martinsurrey 16th Mar 17, 10:53 AM
    • 2,895 Posts
    • 3,534 Thanks
    martinsurrey
    • #3
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:53 AM
    • #3
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:53 AM
    The age of the house should not dictate your decision. Since when has age been the only factor in a house having issues?

    Your tolerance for risk is the deciding factor. If you have the basic survey done this is little more than a valuation survey. If you are happy with that then all well and good. A full structural survey brings better peace of mind as any serious issues are more likely to be identified and, even of these only come to light at a later stage, you have coverage under the surveyors indemnity insurance.

    You pay your money and take your choice.
    Originally posted by MEM62
    Exactly, I bought a 1880's house with a valuation report, I knew work needed doing, I was fairly happy that I knew Victorian construction and issues.

    I'm having a full building survey on a late 1980's house as its modern timber frame construction, and I'm not as confidant that I know what to look out for.
    • Roy1234
    • By Roy1234 16th Mar 17, 10:58 AM
    • 92 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    Roy1234
    • #4
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:58 AM
    • #4
    • 16th Mar 17, 10:58 AM
    MEM62 - That was kind of what I was thinking, but it was nice to hear from someone else that I wasn't probably wasting £1k or whatever a Full Structural Survey costs. And the thought that a serious overlooked defect would become their liability not mine, is an added benefit.

    In terms of choosing a Surveyor (it's for my benefit not a Mortgage Company's) in a location I'm new too, would you pick someone random from the RCIS website, Yellow Pages/Google etc, or ask the selling Estate Agent for recommendations, the latter perhaps influenced by referral fees they may get?
    • MEM62
    • By MEM62 16th Mar 17, 11:45 AM
    • 1,221 Posts
    • 869 Thanks
    MEM62
    • #5
    • 16th Mar 17, 11:45 AM
    • #5
    • 16th Mar 17, 11:45 AM
    Recommendation is always good but RICS membership will at least ensure that they are properly qualified.
    • Roy1234
    • By Roy1234 16th Mar 17, 12:09 PM
    • 92 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    Roy1234
    • #6
    • 16th Mar 17, 12:09 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Mar 17, 12:09 PM
    martinsurrey - sorry just answering out of sequence here. Yes, I know what you mean about modern construction techniques. I saw a new build go up here recently, it was all wood and insulation until the very end when some blocks went around it. To me, perhaps showing my age, it seemed like a child with a saw could have demolished most of the insides in an afternoon.

    Now, I'm trying to believe there is some sense in these modern construction methods, obviously they win on thermal insulation against good old solid brick. But yes, I do wonder if there are new and scary ways for them to go wrong.

    The attraction of this house is its location primarily, and relative lack of (apparent) outstanding work needed. Do you give modern houses any credit?
    • strawberries1
    • By strawberries1 16th Mar 17, 2:28 PM
    • 579 Posts
    • 132 Thanks
    strawberries1
    • #7
    • 16th Mar 17, 2:28 PM
    • #7
    • 16th Mar 17, 2:28 PM
    MEM62 - That was kind of what I was thinking, but it was nice to hear from someone else that I wasn't probably wasting £1k or whatever a Full Structural Survey costs. And the thought that a serious overlooked defect would become their liability not mine, is an added benefit.

    In terms of choosing a Surveyor (it's for my benefit not a Mortgage Company's) in a location I'm new too, would you pick someone random from the RCIS website, Yellow Pages/Google etc, or ask the selling Estate Agent for recommendations, the latter perhaps influenced by referral fees they may get?
    Originally posted by Roy1234
    I'm a FTB so no experience but I hesitate to use the EA's surveyor. He might hesitate to value it lower than the agreed price even if justified.

    What're your thoughts re survey for a 1st floor purpose built late 60s maisonette?
    • n217970
    • By n217970 16th Mar 17, 4:09 PM
    • 79 Posts
    • 47 Thanks
    n217970
    • #8
    • 16th Mar 17, 4:09 PM
    • #8
    • 16th Mar 17, 4:09 PM
    We just bought a 2002 house without getting a survey. Its got plenty of minor problems/maintenance for a house that was supposedly perfect but none of which a survey would have found. If I ever buy a house again I will flush all of the toilets on the viewing no matter how mad the vendor thinks I am.



    The purchasers of our old 1950's house had a survey done which identified "problems" that did not exist (confirmed by buyers builder) and marked other things on the report as a 1, which while not serious should really have been a 2.
    • martinsurrey
    • By martinsurrey 16th Mar 17, 4:23 PM
    • 2,895 Posts
    • 3,534 Thanks
    martinsurrey
    • #9
    • 16th Mar 17, 4:23 PM
    • #9
    • 16th Mar 17, 4:23 PM
    martinsurrey - sorry just answering out of sequence here. Yes, I know what you mean about modern construction techniques. I saw a new build go up here recently, it was all wood and insulation until the very end when some blocks went around it. To me, perhaps showing my age, it seemed like a child with a saw could have demolished most of the insides in an afternoon.

    Now, I'm trying to believe there is some sense in these modern construction methods, obviously they win on thermal insulation against good old solid brick. But yes, I do wonder if there are new and scary ways for them to go wrong.

    The attraction of this house is its location primarily, and relative lack of (apparent) outstanding work needed. Do you give modern houses any credit?
    Originally posted by Roy1234
    They are the same as every construction method since the dawn of time.

    Done well they are fine.
    Done badly they are trouble.

    I'm spending north of £600k on one, so I better believe they are fine!
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

1,234Posts Today

7,888Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • A year of fighting to break the link between mental illness and money problems... https://t.co/JllWotLGqv

  • Today's twitter poll: Is Conservative pact with DUP necessary for stable govt during the crucial Brexit time, or should it've stayed alone?

  • RT @thisismoney: First cash machine was used 50 years ago today: 50 facts you never knew about ATMs https://t.co/nh5kqb5Ml5

  • Follow Martin