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  • FIRST POST
    • dannyjebb
    • By dannyjebb 14th Mar 17, 11:00 PM
    • 372Posts
    • 82Thanks
    dannyjebb
    House price
    • #1
    • 14th Mar 17, 11:00 PM
    House price 14th Mar 17 at 11:00 PM
    So we are looking at a new build priced at 244k the exact same style sold in March 2015 for £195k according to the nationwide house price calculator this house would now be worth £200k..... I am tempted to post a letter through the door asking the current owners if they got discount etc and also using this price as some ammo for negotiating the price of a new build.

    Does anyone know if these kind of calculators are anywhere near accurate, I had to put in the region if the uk so I know they won't be 100% accurate but the area has had nothing happening here that would of drastically affected prices, there are no similar house styles within a 5 mile radius to compare current values with.

    Thanks
Page 1
    • G_M
    • By G_M 14th Mar 17, 11:08 PM
    • 40,553 Posts
    • 46,397 Thanks
    G_M
    • #2
    • 14th Mar 17, 11:08 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Mar 17, 11:08 PM
    Of course they are not accurate.

    And a property is worth what someone will pay for it. If the developer believes he can get £244K for the property, and a buyer comes along and pays that, then that is the market value........

    If you are not willing or able to pay £244, then offer £240. If the developer agrees, that is the current market value.
    • eddddy
    • By eddddy 14th Mar 17, 11:38 PM
    • 4,937 Posts
    • 4,588 Thanks
    eddddy
    • #3
    • 14th Mar 17, 11:38 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Mar 17, 11:38 PM
    ... and also using this price as some ammo for negotiating the price of a new build.
    Originally posted by dannyjebb
    Just to give a different perspective on this...

    When potential buyers try to "educate" me with all sorts of reasons why I should accept their low offer, and why the asking price is too high etc - I tend to lose interest quite quickly.


    Also, if it's a new build you will probably be talking to a salesperson - I suspect they will not be too interested in your calculations. They will have no control over asking price etc. They will just pass your offer up the chain to a decision maker.


    It's probably better to just make your offer and demonstrate that you are proceedable buyer who can work to their timescales.
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 14th Mar 17, 11:56 PM
    • 9,321 Posts
    • 11,768 Thanks
    hazyjo
    • #4
    • 14th Mar 17, 11:56 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Mar 17, 11:56 PM
    Those 'calculators' undervalue mine by £100k-ish, and the house I want to buy by even more. IGNORE THEM.

    Jx
    2017 wins: Opera tickets; film preview; lipstick; Ideal Home Show tickets + afternoon tea & bottle of Champagne; 2 cases of NKD; notebook; bath rack; books; film Premiere; Broadchurch DVDs; lipbalms; hamper (food/wine/Echo Dot/Jo Malone goodies); Avon lippies
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