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    • smmeadow
    • By smmeadow 14th Mar 17, 4:15 PM
    • 25Posts
    • 45Thanks
    smmeadow
    Survey/home buyers report query
    • #1
    • 14th Mar 17, 4:15 PM
    Survey/home buyers report query 14th Mar 17 at 4:15 PM
    Just had the sale of a house fall through due to issues found on the survey and seller refusing to accept there was a problem. On that house we got a full building survey due to it being a refurbishment situation.

    We are now in talks with our landlord about buying the house we live in which is in a more habitable state to say the least! I have gas and electricial safety certficates from renting it. What I dont want to do is fork out more money on an expensive survey for the sale to not go ahead again.

    Home buyers report seems a bit vague and not very informative? Advice appreciated on what is the best option.

    Thanks
Page 1
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 14th Mar 17, 8:01 PM
    • 3,416 Posts
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    Hoploz
    • #2
    • 14th Mar 17, 8:01 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Mar 17, 8:01 PM
    Yes, a homebuyer's report will be a bit vague, as it's essentially a tick-box system. The more detailed report is the building survey. You've been there before ...
    • G_M
    • By G_M 14th Mar 17, 8:13 PM
    • 38,455 Posts
    • 43,546 Thanks
    G_M
    • #3
    • 14th Mar 17, 8:13 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Mar 17, 8:13 PM
    How well do you know the property?

    Do you know if the roof is sound and dry? Is there damp in the property? Do all the doors and windows open and close properly, and are the window frames in good condition?

    It's not really rocket science! As you live there you have lots of time. Start at the top (roof) and work down, booth outside (gutters, downpipes, walls, dpc, drains) and inside (attic, each room, floorboards, stairs etc) and spot the problems.
    • smmeadow
    • By smmeadow 14th Mar 17, 9:16 PM
    • 25 Posts
    • 45 Thanks
    smmeadow
    • #4
    • 14th Mar 17, 9:16 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Mar 17, 9:16 PM
    I know the house quite well. I have been here 18 months. I can see the roof probably needs to couple of tiles replacing. I was thinking of getting a roofer to come in and quote. The windows are new and in good working order. The central heating is new. The brickwork is good.

    I can tell from the survey I had done on the other one what they look at and I am confident this house has none of the same issues. Also this house is exactly the same just a few doors down. I am thinking of just asking about when the damp course went in and just getting that checked over for free by a damp specialist.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 14th Mar 17, 9:49 PM
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    G_M
    • #5
    • 14th Mar 17, 9:49 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Mar 17, 9:49 PM
    Pointless.

    the roof probably needs to couple of tiles replacing.
    £50 - £100 depending how many. Man + ladder + 1 or 2 hours work. £1.00 per tile.

    thinking of just asking about when the damp course went in
    It went in when the house was built!

    just getting that checked over for free by a damp specialist.
    The 'check' will be done by a salesman. Guess what he'll find? Damp of course - which his company can fix for you for £2000.

    If you have damp in the house you would know. There would be a smell. The wallpaper/paint would be peeling. There would be condensation on the windows. You would know.

    If you must get it checked, pay an independant damp surveyor who does not work for a company that fixes demap probems.
    Last edited by G_M; 14-03-2017 at 9:55 PM.
    • smmeadow
    • By smmeadow 14th Mar 17, 9:55 PM
    • 25 Posts
    • 45 Thanks
    smmeadow
    • #6
    • 14th Mar 17, 9:55 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Mar 17, 9:55 PM
    Ok.... there is some condensation on the windows during the winter but there is no insulation in the loft and I dry clothes indoors figured it was due to that.

    I see your point about damp salesman but the survey I had done just told me to get a damp report....
    • waamo
    • By waamo 14th Mar 17, 10:03 PM
    • 954 Posts
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    waamo
    • #7
    • 14th Mar 17, 10:03 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Mar 17, 10:03 PM
    A proper damp report would be by a damp specialist and wouldn't be free.
    This space for hire.
    • smmeadow
    • By smmeadow 14th Mar 17, 10:04 PM
    • 25 Posts
    • 45 Thanks
    smmeadow
    • #8
    • 14th Mar 17, 10:04 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Mar 17, 10:04 PM
    Ok I will look into this. Thanks. It's the only thing I want to properly check really.

    Buying houses is such a minefield
    • G_M
    • By G_M 14th Mar 17, 10:05 PM
    • 38,455 Posts
    • 43,546 Thanks
    G_M
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 17, 10:05 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 17, 10:05 PM
    Ok.... there is some condensation on the windows during the winter but there is no insulation in the loft and I dry clothes indoors figured it was due to that.
    Bad idea - either open windows, use an extractor fan, use a tumble dryer which vents outside or captures moisture. or dry them outside.

    I see your point about damp salesman but the survey I had done just told me to get a damp report....
    Originally posted by smmeadow
    Yes, but a paid damp report from a damp surveyor - not free visit from a salesman!

    By the way, it's your duty as a tenant to report problems with the property. Have you written to the LL reporting the slipped tiles? He should fix them!
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 15th Mar 17, 5:56 PM
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    Hoploz
    If it's mainly damp you're concerned about, if you've been living there without mould, damp patches on walls or musty smells, then it's most likely fine.

    What era was the house built? Does it have cavity walls? Some built in the Victorian era or earlier have solid walls and no damp course. Over the years a damp proof course has sometimes been added by damp specialists (whether needed or not?) but this is not the way these houses were designed to work.
    • smmeadow
    • By smmeadow 15th Mar 17, 8:58 PM
    • 25 Posts
    • 45 Thanks
    smmeadow
    This house was built in 1935. Forgive me if this sounds dumb but there is a layer of blueish purple bricks along the bottom of the house. Damp course?

    No damp patches or musty smell no just paranoid about damp I guess
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