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  • FIRST POST
    • downhillfast
    • By downhillfast 14th Mar 17, 5:01 PM
    • 919Posts
    • 639Thanks
    downhillfast
    At what point to paint new front door?
    • #1
    • 14th Mar 17, 5:01 PM
    At what point to paint new front door? 14th Mar 17 at 5:01 PM
    Hi there

    I know this may sound a bit stupid but we're having a new (solid wood) door fitted this weekend. Door has been ordered online by us and is being fitted by a local joiner (pocket money job). The door will arrive unfinished ready to be painted or varnished... I know for a fact that the door will be trimmed quite significantly to fit as the door frame is quite low (plus joiner told us another door we picked would be a problem as he wouldn't be able to trim enough off it as it was veneer)

    So as the title of the thread... at what point do we paint it as being an external door it surely needs to be finished asap but once it's hung then you then can't easily paint the bottom edge and the bits near the hinges??? Surely people don't have it fitted and then removed to paint and then re-fitted???

    Any guidance much appreciated
Page 1
    • minibbb
    • By minibbb 14th Mar 17, 5:51 PM
    • 305 Posts
    • 75 Thanks
    minibbb
    • #2
    • 14th Mar 17, 5:51 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Mar 17, 5:51 PM
    I painted mine once fitted- I've never known anyone to remove it to paint as you'll likely damage the finish re- hanging it.

    I would use a water based paint for longevity and it dries v quickly so you can actually shut the door again that day!! I used Johnstone's aqua time which my local decorators center mixed to a Farrow and ball colour.
    • EssexExile
    • By EssexExile 14th Mar 17, 6:15 PM
    • 2,289 Posts
    • 1,524 Thanks
    EssexExile
    • #3
    • 14th Mar 17, 6:15 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Mar 17, 6:15 PM
    I'd take it off to paint the bottom & I'd probably do all the edges at the same time. The rest can be done when it's on. But having just started paying people to do this sort of thing instead of doing it myself, it turns out I'm a bit of a perfectionist.
    Tall, dark & handsome. Well two out of three ain't bad.
    • Mr.Generous
    • By Mr.Generous 14th Mar 17, 6:24 PM
    • 1,628 Posts
    • 2,429 Thanks
    Mr.Generous
    • #4
    • 14th Mar 17, 6:24 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Mar 17, 6:24 PM
    End grain is the killer for joinery, the face and sides are quite good at shedding water. make sure top edge, bottom edge and any cut outs get a good treatment. If water or even moisture get into a timber door it will do 1 of 2 things:

    1. Come open at the joints by swelling.
    2. Split panels where thick timbers expand more than thin panels.

    A flexible "High build" coating that bridges gaps and cracks is much better than a low built on joinery products. If a traditional gloss type paint is used you have to be very careful regarding any bare wood, even cracks that appear later. I would imagine your new door will be kiln dried timber and hygroscopic - ie absorbs moisture from the air if exposed.
    • Private Church
    • By Private Church 14th Mar 17, 7:28 PM
    • 259 Posts
    • 605 Thanks
    Private Church
    • #5
    • 14th Mar 17, 7:28 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Mar 17, 7:28 PM
    Hi there

    I know this may sound a bit stupid but we're having a new (solid wood) door fitted this weekend. Door has been ordered online by us and is being fitted by a local joiner (pocket money job). The door will arrive unfinished ready to be painted or varnished... I know for a fact that the door will be trimmed quite significantly to fit as the door frame is quite low (plus joiner told us another door we picked would be a problem as he wouldn't be able to trim enough off it as it was veneer)
    Originally posted by downhillfast
    Exterior doors that are engineered and have a veneered top layer are not good in my opinion. If the carpenter fitting the door cuts off more than the manufacturer stipulates you will void any warranty. You will also void the warranty if you do not prime,undercoat and top coat all faces and edges when its fitted. Veneered or engineered doors are cheaper than solid doors and in my opinion are a gamble.Some will last a decent length of time and others will be falling apart after 12 months.

    I would prime it with aluminium wood primer followed by at least 2 oil based/spirit based undercoats and 1-2 top coats. If it is a veneered door to comply with the warranty they will likely specify the hinges cuts outs and lock mortice decorated too .

    So to sum up, aluminium primer to both inside and outside faces and then undercoats faces all before fitting. Then fit and prime all edges immediately before screwing door onto frame, then next day take door off and undercoat all edges (twice in a day) screw door back on and repeat the following day with top coats on all edges........... Its a real palaver but otherwise warranty will likey be voided and doormay well fall apart.
    Last edited by Private Church; 14-03-2017 at 7:34 PM.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 15th Mar 17, 9:01 AM
    • 3,383 Posts
    • 2,130 Thanks
    Furts
    • #6
    • 15th Mar 17, 9:01 AM
    • #6
    • 15th Mar 17, 9:01 AM
    I go with the above post. In general, buying external doors on the internet is a huge risk. Not something I would do, but the decision has been made.

    General principles of building are doors are laid flat to decorate - so tackle yours before fitting at least with a primer and base coat/undercoat. But pay careful attention to any warranty terms, and requirements for decorating.

    All external doors should be pre-treated against rot, but the reality is I suspect none are. Here you need to make enquiries to your supplier. If there is no treatment then apply some with care provided the warranty allows this. Obviously no good if the doors are veneered, but external doors should not be veneered anyway!
    • lg13mza
    • By lg13mza 15th Mar 17, 1:45 PM
    • 62 Posts
    • 21 Thanks
    lg13mza
    • #7
    • 15th Mar 17, 1:45 PM
    • #7
    • 15th Mar 17, 1:45 PM
    Can't you put the old door back up after it has been sized so you can prep it properly?
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