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    • henrygregory
    • By henrygregory 14th Mar 17, 1:40 PM
    • 440Posts
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    henrygregory
    First time buying a 60ís property?
    • #1
    • 14th Mar 17, 1:40 PM
    First time buying a 60ís property? 14th Mar 17 at 1:40 PM
    Hi there, I am trying to buy my first home. I have a good deposit but canít afford the new build places as they are just so expensive. Found a nice 3 bed 60s home which has been modernised. Is there anything I need to be careful of as I am sure properties of this age may need things doing soon?
    I have asked and had answers on the following:
    Gas boiler for c/h and hot water is 9 years old but has been serviced by british gas each year
    Vendor does not know how old wiring is, it doesnít look original to me, but on my second viewing I will see if I can unscrew a light fitting and see what colour the wires are. I will also check the consumer unit and see what it looks like.

    It has cavity wall insulation which is good and the roof looks to be in good condition. It has circa 90s double glazing.
    Any pointers or tips would be greatly appreciated.
Page 1
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 14th Mar 17, 1:49 PM
    • 2,667 Posts
    • 3,642 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    • #2
    • 14th Mar 17, 1:49 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Mar 17, 1:49 PM
    When you have had an offer accepted on a house you have it surveyed. If you get a full structural survey the surveyor will tell you what might need to be repaired. Don't do anything until you have had an offer accepted.
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 14th Mar 17, 1:55 PM
    • 1,842 Posts
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    ReadingTim
    • #3
    • 14th Mar 17, 1:55 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Mar 17, 1:55 PM
    Here's a tip: attempting to unscrew a light fitting will not endear you to the vendor.

    Furthermore, even assuming you do expose the wiring, can identify whether it's a junction box or loop in circuit, and in the case of the latter, can identify the circuit vs the switch cable, can you explain why red and black sheathing is inherently more dangerous than blue and brown?
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 14th Mar 17, 3:22 PM
    • 1,509 Posts
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    Red-Squirrel
    • #4
    • 14th Mar 17, 3:22 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Mar 17, 3:22 PM
    It sounds like its been well maintained and updated over the years, if the roof hasn't been replaced though it might need doing within the next 10 years or so.

    See what the survey says about the electrics etc. don't go messing around with light fittings, you don't want to seem like a nightmare high maintenance buyer!
    • henrygregory
    • By henrygregory 14th Mar 17, 4:10 PM
    • 440 Posts
    • 47 Thanks
    henrygregory
    • #5
    • 14th Mar 17, 4:10 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Mar 17, 4:10 PM
    It sounds like its been well maintained and updated over the years, if the roof hasn't been replaced though it might need doing within the next 10 years or so.

    See what the survey says about the electrics etc. don't go messing around with light fittings, you don't want to seem like a nightmare high maintenance buyer!
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    Seems so. From inside, it is hard to tell it is the age it is which is good. Any rough ideas on what a replacement roof might cost for a three bed semi detached? We are going to end up using all of my savings on the deposit so would be good to get some ideas on what sort of money I should be putting aside for repairs.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 14th Mar 17, 4:25 PM
    • 1,509 Posts
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    Red-Squirrel
    • #6
    • 14th Mar 17, 4:25 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Mar 17, 4:25 PM
    Seems so. From inside, it is hard to tell it is the age it is which is good. Any rough ideas on what a replacement roof might cost for a three bed semi detached? We are going to end up using all of my savings on the deposit so would be good to get some ideas on what sort of money I should be putting aside for repairs.
    Originally posted by henrygregory
    Bad idea. If you need to do that then wait and save a bit more, or buy a slightly cheaper house.

    Any house could need work doing in the first few years of you owning it that nobody could predict. You should have a contingency fund after you complete ready for this.
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 14th Mar 17, 6:21 PM
    • 3,036 Posts
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    bouicca21
    • #7
    • 14th Mar 17, 6:21 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Mar 17, 6:21 PM
    Whilst having a contingency is useful, I well remember that buying anything at all required every last penny we had. No contingency, and yes we survived. But I'm talking about London; contingencies may be feasible in cheaper areas.

    Having said that my previous two houses were built in the 1930s and still had their original roofs. My current property was built in the mid 1960s - not ugly but not pretty either, solidly built and no sign of any problem with the roof. I'd stop worrying, certainly wouldn't be fiddling with light fittings, would be taking a careful look at the damp course, and rely on a surveyor to point out hidden nasties.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 14th Mar 17, 7:52 PM
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    Red-Squirrel
    • #8
    • 14th Mar 17, 7:52 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Mar 17, 7:52 PM
    Whilst having a contingency is useful, I well remember that buying anything at all required every last penny we had. No contingency, and yes we survived. But I'm talking about London; contingencies may be feasible in cheaper areas.

    Having said that my previous two houses were built in the 1930s and still had their original roofs. My current property was built in the mid 1960s - not ugly but not pretty either, solidly built and no sign of any problem with the roof. I'd stop worrying, certainly wouldn't be fiddling with light fittings, would be taking a careful look at the damp course, and rely on a surveyor to point out hidden nasties.
    Originally posted by bouicca21
    I suppose it depends on your comfort level with risk. On my first purchase I didn't have a spare penny after completion, but it was a modern flat so I had very little responsibility for the 'fabric' of the place.

    I bought a house about 18 months ago, and even though it was a renovation project and I knew it would need lots of work, there have been unexpected costs (thanks storm Angus!) and I would have hated to be in the position of having a leaking roof, or a dead boiler or a mysterious damp patch knowing my only option to sort it was to take on debt.
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 14th Mar 17, 8:04 PM
    • 7,378 Posts
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    Owain Moneysaver
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 17, 8:04 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 17, 8:04 PM
    Loft insulation? Might be the original 1 inch of fibreglass, but it's fairly easy and cheap to top it up if you do it yourself. Original windows and doors or replacement? - older replacement d/glazing might be externally beaded without security tape, which is a security risk.

    Unless it's been completely rewired, there is likely to be a severe shortage of power points, and ceiling lights may be in awkward places near windows.

    The boiler might be fairly new but the radiators and pipework may not be. Loft tanks if still used may be metal and rusting, and not have lids. Hot water pipes, boiler cupboards etc may be insulated with asbestos.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • bouicca21
    • By bouicca21 14th Mar 17, 8:47 PM
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    bouicca21
    I would have hated to be in the position of having a leaking roof, or a dead boiler or a mysterious damp patch knowing my only option to sort it was to take on debt.
    With the last house we almost immediately found we needed a new boiler over one of the coldest winters. We wore lots of extra clothes, slept in dressing gowns under duvets with extra blankets on top. And saved like mad. A contingency would have been great - but I'm sure I'm not the only person trying to clamber on to a very expensive ladder, who has had to manage without one.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 15th Mar 17, 12:06 AM
    • 1,509 Posts
    • 4,077 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    With the last house we almost immediately found we needed a new boiler over one of the coldest winters. We wore lots of extra clothes, slept in dressing gowns under duvets with extra blankets on top. And saved like mad. A contingency would have been great - but I'm sure I'm not the only person trying to clamber on to a very expensive ladder, who has had to manage without one.
    Originally posted by bouicca21
    I was the same, but I bought a flat which removed a lot of the responsibility. I think my concern would be that some maintenance problems only get worse and more expensive the longer you have to wait to fix them.
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