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  • FIRST POST
    • GT60
    • By GT60 14th Mar 17, 10:22 AM
    • 1,625Posts
    • 923Thanks
    GT60
    Upcycling bedroom furniture
    • #1
    • 14th Mar 17, 10:22 AM
    Upcycling bedroom furniture 14th Mar 17 at 10:22 AM
    HI I have some pine drawers and a wardrobe and I am thinking of painting the cream which seems to be all the trend just now for furniture.
    What I would like to know is what paint should I use and do I need an undercoat also can I use one of those small rollers and tray, if so how do I clean the roller or is it a case of use it and bin it?
    Thanks
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Page 1
    • freeman3030
    • By freeman3030 14th Mar 17, 10:27 AM
    • 156 Posts
    • 60 Thanks
    freeman3030
    • #2
    • 14th Mar 17, 10:27 AM
    • #2
    • 14th Mar 17, 10:27 AM
    Hi,
    I love upcycling furniture. The best paint tonuse is Annie Sloan Chaulk paint. You don't need to prime it, but if the wood it's knotty (which I an imagine it is) you'll need to use a shallac based primer first as the knots will appear to bleed and show a yellow tinge through the paint. Then once it's dry (it dries really quickly) you just seal it with Annie Sloan wax. Look up YouTube videos on it, it's bloody great!
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    • GT60
    • By GT60 14th Mar 17, 11:01 AM
    • 1,625 Posts
    • 923 Thanks
    GT60
    • #3
    • 14th Mar 17, 11:01 AM
    • #3
    • 14th Mar 17, 11:01 AM
    How much paint and wax would I need to paint 3 x 4 draw chest of draws and a double wardrobe leaving the tops brown
    also do I need those fancy brushes?
    Thank you for this
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    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 14th Mar 17, 12:37 PM
    • 3,406 Posts
    • 2,975 Thanks
    Hoploz
    • #4
    • 14th Mar 17, 12:37 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Mar 17, 12:37 PM
    I always give my furniture a bit of a sand first. I just run over it with my little palm sander to give the paint a key so it stocks better and is more durable.

    Then I use Wickes primer, and finish with whatever is to hand. You could use chalk paint. Most often I use satinwood paint which doesn't need any sealer afterwards. I've also used emulsion left over from painting walls and sealed with Wilko Matt varnish.
    • GT60
    • By GT60 14th Mar 17, 3:54 PM
    • 1,625 Posts
    • 923 Thanks
    GT60
    • #5
    • 14th Mar 17, 3:54 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Mar 17, 3:54 PM
    sorry to appear thick but what's the difference between satinwood and chalk paint?
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    • Denene
    • By Denene 14th Mar 17, 5:10 PM
    • 123 Posts
    • 171 Thanks
    Denene
    • #6
    • 14th Mar 17, 5:10 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Mar 17, 5:10 PM
    Satinwood is the more "traditional" product for painting wood, often used on skirting boards etc instead of gloss. It gives a slightly shiny (but not glossy) finish. Chalk paint has become popular because you don't need to do a lot of preparation before using it. It has a matt finish, and you give it a top layer of wax (which darkens the colour a little) to make it more resilient.

    I recently painted a chest of 5 drawers with Annie Sloan paint and used less than a quarter of the tin, so depending on the size of the wardrobe you might only need 1 tin. I stirred the paint well, and then dipped the brush directly in the tin rather than using a tray. You can just use a normal paint brush. Next time I would decant it into a smaller container to use it.

    You can buy light or dark wax, and apply it with a microfibre or jey cloth and lots of elbow grease! I didn't bother with the wax brush they sell, as it cost about £25.

    I also used satinwood paint for another project, and it washes off with warm water and washing up liquid, so no need to throw away. You can wrap brushes etc. in cling film to stop them drying overnight.

    If the furniture has already got a finish (paint or varnish) I don't think you would need to prime it, but you would probably need to sand it a bit so the (satinwood) paint would adhere. If it's bare wood, then do use primer.
    • Chrystal
    • By Chrystal 14th Mar 17, 5:15 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 95 Thanks
    Chrystal
    • #7
    • 14th Mar 17, 5:15 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Mar 17, 5:15 PM
    sorry to appear thick but what's the difference between satinwood and chalk paint?
    Originally posted by GT60
    Satinwood paint doesn't need to be sealed. Chalk paint needs to be sealed with wax when it's dry. Neither needs a primer. If people want the 'distressed' look ie sanding some of the paint of edges so it looks old they use the chalk paint as it's easier to remove and then seal with wax. I've got both and prefer to do the satinwood finish, but both give good results.
    • Cats are great
    • By Cats are great 20th Mar 17, 9:25 AM
    • 27 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    Cats are great
    • #8
    • 20th Mar 17, 9:25 AM
    • #8
    • 20th Mar 17, 9:25 AM
    There is another more cost effective way to up cycle, you can use emulsion paint.

    Lightly sand your furniture with a fine sandpaper, or wet & dry Water down your paint so it has the consistency of cream,

    Apply your first coat, let it dry, give it a very light sand and repeat until you get the depth of colour you like then finally 2 coats of wax.

    Much cheaper than the chalk based or oil based finishes, I've done it on a dresser in my dining room and it stands up well to heat and stuff being dragged over it.
    • GT60
    • By GT60 20th Mar 17, 9:29 AM
    • 1,625 Posts
    • 923 Thanks
    GT60
    • #9
    • 20th Mar 17, 9:29 AM
    • #9
    • 20th Mar 17, 9:29 AM
    What wax would I use?
    Thanks
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    • bertiewhite
    • By bertiewhite 20th Mar 17, 9:32 AM
    • 217 Posts
    • 185 Thanks
    bertiewhite
    I wouldn't waste money on "Annie Sloan" - you can get much cheaper alternatives which are just as good.

    My wife uses chalk paint for the base coat and then "dry brushes" emulsion on top, using the dregs from old tins left in my workshop.
    • Horseygirl123
    • By Horseygirl123 20th Mar 17, 12:49 PM
    • 293 Posts
    • 402 Thanks
    Horseygirl123
    What look do you want? Distressed, battered? I personally hate the look and have painted more furniture than I care to remember. Is it real wood you want to paint or melamine? I have used chalk paint for small pieces my daughters wanted, eg Gilt mirrors, curtain poles, small bedside tables etc and then distressed them. Although you can apply chalk paint directly without any preparation, the time taken in waxing negates preparation time. I am yet to be convinced the finished pieces are very durable and they do chip easily and unless that is the look you want .. stay clear. IKEA melamine surfaces I use a specialist primer and then water based eggshell and for real wood I sand down, water based prime/undercoat and water based eggshell.
    • Horseygirl123
    • By Horseygirl123 20th Mar 17, 12:54 PM
    • 293 Posts
    • 402 Thanks
    Horseygirl123
    What wax would I use?
    Thanks
    Originally posted by GT60
    You use one of the waxes made to be used with chalk paints. They come in clear, light and dark shades. Most diy places sell them and also places like Hobbycraft and The Range. Lots of different manufacturers.
    • GT60
    • By GT60 20th Mar 17, 1:14 PM
    • 1,625 Posts
    • 923 Thanks
    GT60
    It is just old pine furniture that I want to paint a cream colour and leave the tops brown
    not interested in the distress look
    just want a smooth nice finish something like these muppets sell http://www.oakfurnitureland.co.uk/furniture/country-cottage-natural-oak-and-painted-3-2-drawer-chest/7859.html
    Last edited by GT60; 20-03-2017 at 1:16 PM.
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    • imho
    • By imho 20th Mar 17, 2:45 PM
    • 2,406 Posts
    • 1,571 Thanks
    imho
    I am thinkIng of painting my Pine but will leave the top still in Pine like the one in GT60 link.
    • Horseygirl123
    • By Horseygirl123 20th Mar 17, 3:20 PM
    • 293 Posts
    • 402 Thanks
    Horseygirl123
    It is just old pine furniture that I want to paint a cream colour and leave the tops brown
    not interested in the distress look
    just want a smooth nice finish something like these muppets sell http://www.oakfurnitureland.co.uk/furniture/country-cottage-natural-oak-and-painted-3-2-drawer-chest/7859.html
    Originally posted by GT60
    That looks like a straightforward paint job. I'd give the furniture a good clean, sand lightly, prime and undercoat and eggshell. If you want a good tough finish then a coat of varnish on top. I'd use a mohair mini roller and a laying off brush.

    I use eggshell normally but gloss or satinwood would be OK. A gloss finish old be pretty tough as well.
    Last edited by Horseygirl123; 20-03-2017 at 3:25 PM.
    • Annie1960
    • By Annie1960 20th Mar 17, 6:18 PM
    • 2,116 Posts
    • 1,305 Thanks
    Annie1960
    http://makeityours.co.uk/product/furniture-finishing-wax/

    This is the one I used last year on a couple of bedside tables, and they are still fine. I put wallpaper on the top and front of the drawers and painted/waxed the rest.

    Make sure you get the clear wax (unless you want the dark coloured one).

    I bought the wax in Homebase - cost about £10-£12 or so.
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