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  • FIRST POST
    • invisibility
    • By invisibility 13th Mar 17, 1:39 PM
    • 18Posts
    • 11Thanks
    invisibility
    Quit my job because of mental illness - am I entitled to anything?
    • #1
    • 13th Mar 17, 1:39 PM
    Quit my job because of mental illness - am I entitled to anything? 13th Mar 17 at 1:39 PM
    I'm 24 years old with a history of anxiety and depression. At uni I was entitled to disabled students allowance which helped a lot when I had "episodes".

    Fast forward and last summer I had a terrible relapse (I'd mostly had it under control) and was signed off work from August 2016 to January 2017 when I made the decision to quit, because I wasn't moving forward and I knew deep down I wouldn't go back after so long off.

    I have been looking for jobs but I think I've been fooling myself into thinking I'm ready - I've had interviews that I couldn't attend, or have attended and had a breakdown when there. I also signed up for supply teaching (I was a teacher) but found I couldn't go to any jobs due to my condition. My parents have been telling me I am not well enough to work yet, but I don't know what I'm supposed to do about money.

    I can't claim JSA because I can't really job seek with the same intent as I could if I was well.

    Is there anything I could apply for? My parents are supporting me the best they can but we are all thinking there must be some financial support I can get as I am unable to work or claim JSA.

    I've googled it but there's so many different types of support for people who are 'disabled' that I don't know where to start.

    Any help would be really appreciated.
Page 1
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 13th Mar 17, 1:47 PM
    • 868 Posts
    • 910 Thanks
    NeilCr
    • #2
    • 13th Mar 17, 1:47 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Mar 17, 1:47 PM
    Some information here

    https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/benefits/sick-or-disabled-people-and-carers/

    ESA and PIP are possibilities.

    Do you live with your parents? If you rent then Housing Benefit and Council Tax Support

    May well be worth a visit to a CAB/metal health support group to chat about benefits in general and other areas of support

    Good luck!
    • Muttleythefrog
    • By Muttleythefrog 13th Mar 17, 1:48 PM
    • 10,144 Posts
    • 18,794 Thanks
    Muttleythefrog
    • #3
    • 13th Mar 17, 1:48 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Mar 17, 1:48 PM
    Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) is the alternative to JSA but where you are unable to work because of illness or disability. You would need the support of your GP or equivalent in claiming in the first phase of the benefit via a 'fit note' (sick note) and then after the initial assessment period of 3 months you should be assessed as to whether you qualify for the main phase of ESA via the dreaded Work Capability Assessment. Worth looking into.
    "Do not attribute to conspiracy what can adequately be explained by incompetence" - rogerblack
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 13th Mar 17, 5:25 PM
    • 7,886 Posts
    • 4,697 Thanks
    teddysmum
    • #4
    • 13th Mar 17, 5:25 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Mar 17, 5:25 PM
    This is a negative, but if you don't feel that you can cope with a regular teaching job, I would not recommend supply work, as it is far more stressful.


    I did supply work years ago and children know you are not permanent so play up and some refuse to believe that you are a proper teacher. (I was lucky as most of my supply work was done in a school where I was known by the pupils or one of their family.)


    Gone are the days when new teachers had a mentor, as 'permanent' (used loosely; hence the ' ') teachers are now required to do much more than teach, so don't have the time and have even less to spare for someone who won't be staying long.


    If your subject is academic, have you approached your local college for work with adults, in what was once called Basic Skills (maths, English and ESL) ? It does require an extra qualification on FE teaching, though.
    • stuomac88
    • By stuomac88 14th Mar 17, 12:18 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    stuomac88
    • #5
    • 14th Mar 17, 12:18 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Mar 17, 12:18 PM
    Hi all,

    Don't know if this is the right place to post but please advise if not.

    My partner has been unemployed since July when her ssp stopped and she was let go by her employer after 7 months on the sick.

    Since then she has had no income from benefits whatsoever.

    She has borderline personality disorder but was turned down for PIP and received the same answer on appeal.

    She was also turned down for ESA. Income related she won't get due to my income (around 16k) and apparently she couldn't get contribution based due to lack of NI credits(even though she was employed between September 2015 & July 2016).

    Does anyone know if we can get any help? Like I said I earn about £16k a year. We have a mortgage and bills and have no help whatsoever.

    Any information/advice would be much appreciated.

    Many thanks
    Stuart
    • pmlindyloo
    • By pmlindyloo 14th Mar 17, 12:57 PM
    • 10,522 Posts
    • 12,439 Thanks
    pmlindyloo
    • #6
    • 14th Mar 17, 12:57 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Mar 17, 12:57 PM
    Did you apply for working tax credits? You may be eligible if you are over 25 and working at least 30 hrs a week but looking at your figures it may be 'tight'.

    So I would apply if you meet the criteria.

    Otherwise the only other possible benefit is council tax reduction.

    Can you take in a lodger?
    Can you renegotiate your mortgage repayments - longer term?
    Can you increase your hours/change jobs to increase income?
    Can you partner manage a part time job?

    You can post your details on the Debtfree Wannabe forum (even if you have no debts). They are a very supportive lot and will help you as best they can.

    Also read all the articles on this website about reducing your expenditure - utilities/mobile phones etc etc
    • invisibility
    • By invisibility 15th Mar 17, 7:19 PM
    • 18 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    invisibility
    • #7
    • 15th Mar 17, 7:19 PM
    • #7
    • 15th Mar 17, 7:19 PM
    Huge thanks for pointing me in the right direction. This looks like what I was after. I'm seeing my doctor about it tomorrow then I can get on with my claim.

    And teddysmum - yeah, I know, I think I was under the impression it would be a stress free return to work but I don't think it would work. Sadly my subject isn't the type that lends itself to extra work like that - I taught A-Level Politics.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 15th Mar 17, 7:49 PM
    • 7,886 Posts
    • 4,697 Thanks
    teddysmum
    • #8
    • 15th Mar 17, 7:49 PM
    • #8
    • 15th Mar 17, 7:49 PM
    Huge thanks for pointing me in the right direction. This looks like what I was after. I'm seeing my doctor about it tomorrow then I can get on with my claim.

    And teddysmum - yeah, I know, I think I was under the impression it would be a stress free return to work but I don't think it would work. Sadly my subject isn't the type that lends itself to extra work like that - I taught A-Level Politics.
    Originally posted by invisibility


    All branches of teaching have their stress factor but supply work is the worst, followed by sub A level work ,when the 'elite' in a department take the easy (ie cleverest and most eager pupils).


    In private schools, the pupils are much easier, as most daren't waste the parents' money and the schools don't like trouble makers, but the parents are the problem there, expecting silk purses from pigs' ears and whoa betide if Teacher makes a mistake .


    FE, with adults, is far easier as the pupils actually want to be there, but colleagues did complain about difficult young students there because their job prospects required then to be (and they'd prefer doing nothing for free benefits), but subjects are limited.


    I would have loved to teach just GCSE maths (well qualified) but those jobs were rare as hens' teeth, even in maths (my subject) and English, which are the lost popular.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 15th Mar 17, 7:52 PM
    • 7,886 Posts
    • 4,697 Thanks
    teddysmum
    • #9
    • 15th Mar 17, 7:52 PM
    • #9
    • 15th Mar 17, 7:52 PM
    A thought : I don't know whether you still can qualify this way, now, but Basic Skills (now renamed) tutor courses were open to anyone of suitable background. My immediate superior taught (still teaches?) maths but is a graduate chemist.
    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 16th Mar 17, 12:23 AM
    • 22,044 Posts
    • 12,712 Thanks
    xylophone
    whoa betide if Teacher makes a mistake .
    Woe betide?
    • xylophone
    • By xylophone 16th Mar 17, 12:30 AM
    • 22,044 Posts
    • 12,712 Thanks
    xylophone
    - yeah, I know, I think I was under the impression it would be a stress free return to work but I don't think it would work. Sadly my subject isn't the type that lends itself to extra work like that - I taught A-Level Politics.
    I imagine that for a person suffering from clinical depression, trying to concentrate on any demanding job must be very,very difficult - and where the job demands high levels of personal interaction well nigh impossible.

    Teaching must be one of the most difficult jobs to do well if you are feeling physically or mentally under par.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 16th Mar 17, 1:31 PM
    • 7,886 Posts
    • 4,697 Thanks
    teddysmum
    Woe betide?
    Originally posted by xylophone
    I can't believe that I made that mistake !


    Mind you, when writing and thinking the appropriate word is 'their' your brain can do its own thing and cause you to write 'there' (Luckily usually spotted before pressing 'submit'.


    I'm very aware of the differences between 'to' 'two' and 'too', but sometimes use the wrong spelling. (Again spotted 99% of the time).


    As my post suggested ,that mistake would have meant a parent reporting you to the head of a private school and having you summoned to The Presence.
    • crossstitchamy
    • By crossstitchamy 16th Mar 17, 3:13 PM
    • 99 Posts
    • 49 Thanks
    crossstitchamy
    Hi yes you should be able to get ESA . I have just had to go to tribunal to fight to stay on it for my chronic anxiety and depression. I was awarded 18 points in the end with Regulation 35. Regulation 35 means that you get into the support group cos going to interviews and work etc makes you feel worse. Good luck .
    • McKneff
    • By McKneff 9th Apr 17, 4:32 PM
    • 35,409 Posts
    • 45,570 Thanks
    McKneff
    Hi all,

    Don't know if this is the right place to post but please advise if not.

    My partner has been unemployed since July when her ssp stopped and she was let go by her employer after 7 months on the sick.

    Since then she has had no income from benefits whatsoever.

    She has borderline personality disorder but was turned down for PIP and received the same answer on appeal.

    She was also turned down for ESA. Income related she won't get due to my income (around 16k) and apparently she couldn't get contribution based due to lack of NI credits(even though she was employed between September 2015 & July 2016).

    Does anyone know if we can get any help? Like I said I earn about £16k a year. We have a mortgage and bills and have no help whatsoever.

    Any information/advice would be much appreciated.

    Many thanks
    Stuart
    Originally posted by stuomac88
    You should start a thread of you own, if you jump in on one then it gets confusing as to who is talking to who.
    No one can make you feel inferior without your consent
    • xXMessedUpXx
    • By xXMessedUpXx 11th Apr 17, 10:51 PM
    • 16,948 Posts
    • 44,531 Thanks
    xXMessedUpXx
    I claimed ESA and then DLA after my breakdown in 2009 (led to me being diagnosed with bipolar) i was un the support group due to the regulation 35 that crosstitchamy mentioned. Tbh i was in a bad place, couldn;t work and for the time i was on it it gave me chance to breathe and recover whilst still being able to keep a roof over my head and pay bills. DLA no longer exits for new claimants but PIP is its replacement. You can claim both PIP and ESA at the same time.

    Happy to say after my time on ESA i managed to go back to work, have needed a lot of adjustments but don't give up.
    "Life Is Like A Beautiful Melody Only The Lyrics Are Messed Up"
    To see the rainbow you need both the sun and the rain to make its colours appear
    weight lost: 0lbs
    • MCGONIS
    • By MCGONIS 15th Apr 17, 1:34 AM
    • 682 Posts
    • 777 Thanks
    MCGONIS
    Woe betide?
    Originally posted by xylophone
    Yawns.
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