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  • FIRST POST
    • Nookie5
    • By Nookie5 13th Mar 17, 10:37 AM
    • 7Posts
    • 1Thanks
    Nookie5
    Interviewer went berserk on me
    • #1
    • 13th Mar 17, 10:37 AM
    Interviewer went berserk on me 13th Mar 17 at 10:37 AM
    I was previously interviewing for an office junior job just to help improve my interviewing skills. After the interview, I sent a polite email to the interviewer to withdraw my application because of bad fit.

    Moments later he called to interrogate me and shouted at me for wasting his time. I hanged up on him because he was so rude.

    He then sent me a lengthy email to express his disappointment in me, highlighted how great his company is and it's my loss for withdrawing my application.

    About 10 minutes later he called again, asked if I read his email and said I'm stupid if I still want to withdraw my application after seeing how much profit they make, their reputation etc. I hanged up on him shortly after he said I'm probably withdrawing because I have mental issues, suffer from depression or something like that.
Page 2
    • jobbingmusician
    • By jobbingmusician 13th Mar 17, 2:32 PM
    • 18,612 Posts
    • 18,871 Thanks
    jobbingmusician
    The interview is just as much for the interviewee to find out about the employer as vice versa. If the fit had been fab, maybe the OP would have taken the job! It's totally out of order to rant at someone for withdrawing their application!
    I'm the Board Guide on the Matched Betting; Referrers and Jobseeking & Training boards. I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly, and I can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with this). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com.

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    • bertiewhite
    • By bertiewhite 13th Mar 17, 2:38 PM
    • 483 Posts
    • 438 Thanks
    bertiewhite
    I can't see much difference between going for the practice and applying for several jobs at once in order to have a backup should you not get the job you want.

    I know many leaving the Armed Forces start to apply for many jobs long before their exit date in the belief that by setting their sights high (no pun intended) they might just get offered a job they never expected to get.
    • neilio
    • By neilio 13th Mar 17, 2:44 PM
    • 197 Posts
    • 101 Thanks
    neilio
    There are ways of withdrawing, though. Personally, if it wasn't for me, I'd leave it at the interview and if I never hear from them again, fine. If they call back to offer a job or second interview, I'd politely decline. To proactively contact a hiring manager immediately after an interview to say you're not interested is a bit foolish; you never know if you might cross paths with them or someone in their HR department again.
    • steampowered
    • By steampowered 13th Mar 17, 3:09 PM
    • 1,508 Posts
    • 1,473 Thanks
    steampowered
    A couple of months ago I withdrew an application after a second interview. The interviews went reasonably well, but it became apparent that the job was slightly different to what I thought and wasn't the right fit.

    The employer thanked for letting them know, as it saved them the time of needing to evaluate me against the other candidates, and wished me the best of luck in my search.

    The employer you interviewed with sounds like a bad apple.
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 13th Mar 17, 3:19 PM
    • 59,638 Posts
    • 348,339 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    It's absolutely a pain in the !!!! to interview someone who has no intention of taking the job.

    However, he didn't know you had no intention of taking it. It is perfectly acceptable to withdraw after interview if you don't like what's on offer.
    Originally posted by ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    The OP didn't like what was on offer, a decision reached during/after the interview. It happens a lot as you don't like the people, building, firm, location of the desk, and "feel" of the atmosphere.

    That's what interviews are for.... see if you like them/what their offer is.

    So basically you wasted his time, and if he had known that, his reaction is more understandable. However as he didn't know that, then his reaction is unacceptable, from his perspective. You can't complain about it though because you have additional information that means that you know he had a point, even though he didn't know that. You are both in the wrong.
    Originally posted by ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    The OP didn't waste his time. An interview is a two way street: do we like you? do you like us? Do we wish to make an offer? Do you think the offer is worthy of your attention?

    The hiring company is in the wrong entirely.
    NOT the OP.

    The hiring owner was clearly a nutter and a bullet was dodged there.
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 13th Mar 17, 7:12 PM
    • 1,803 Posts
    • 2,641 Thanks
    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    The OP didn't like what was on offer, a decision reached during/after the interview. It happens a lot as you don't like the people, building, firm, location of the desk, and "feel" of the atmosphere.

    That's what interviews are for.... see if you like them/what their offer is.



    The OP didn't waste his time. An interview is a two way street: do we like you? do you like us? Do we wish to make an offer? Do you think the offer is worthy of your attention?

    The hiring company is in the wrong entirely.
    NOT the OP.

    The hiring owner was clearly a nutter and a bullet was dodged there.
    Originally posted by PasturesNew

    Which part of "It is perfectly acceptable to withdraw after interview if you don't like what's on offer." did you not understand?

    You have quoted my post which makes the exact point you go on to preach at me and ignored the fact that the OP announced that s/he never had any intention of taking the job. Why have you done this?
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 13th Mar 17, 8:56 PM
    • 1,038 Posts
    • 706 Thanks
    Tarambor
    I was previously interviewing for an office junior job just to help improve my interviewing skills.

    Moments later he called to interrogate me and shouted at me for wasting his time.
    Originally posted by Nookie5
    You did. You wasted his time and that of a person who may have wanted the job, needed it desperately and could have possibly got it but didn't even get a chance of an interview because you just wanted to improve your interview skills.

    I'd have added selfish to time wasting as well.
    • keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • By keepcalmandstayoutofdebt 13th Mar 17, 10:00 PM
    • 2,776 Posts
    • 1,444 Thanks
    keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    I was previously interviewing for an office junior job just to help improve my interviewing skills. After the interview, I sent a polite email to the interviewer to withdraw my application because of bad fit.

    Moments later he called to interrogate me and shouted at me for wasting his time. I hanged up on him because he was so rude.

    He then sent me a lengthy email to express his disappointment in me, highlighted how great his company is and it's my loss for withdrawing my application.

    About 10 minutes later he called again, asked if I read his email and said I'm stupid if I still want to withdraw my application after seeing how much profit they make, their reputation etc. I hanged up on him shortly after he said I'm probably withdrawing because I have mental issues, suffer from depression or something like that.
    Originally posted by Nookie5
    What would you like to happen exactly? Sounds like there was more to this. I've heard of a similar rant when someone attends interview, accepts offered job and then messes the employer around.
    The last interview I went to that I ended up deciding I didn't want/was just above my level I was told there were at least 4 others in the running and after the interview decided I probably wouldn't return the email or call if it came, just to save on this very situation so what were you hoping for again.
    "If you are caught in a rainstorm, once you accept that you'll receive a soaking, the only thing left to do is enjoy the walk"
    • tripled
    • By tripled 13th Mar 17, 10:56 PM
    • 2,439 Posts
    • 1,098 Thanks
    tripled
    Of course he knows. I've interview hundreds of people and no one has ever withdrawn straight after interview. If it happened I'd assume I'd been messed around even if wasn't sure why.
    Originally posted by shortcrust
    I have withdrawn anything from straight after to 24 hours after an interview on a number of occasions as I've decided the role isn't for me. As far as I'm concerned, I'm interviewing the company just as much as they're interviewing me. So you may be assuming wrong.
    Last edited by tripled; 13-03-2017 at 10:58 PM.
    • Malthusian
    • By Malthusian 14th Mar 17, 4:44 PM
    • 2,607 Posts
    • 3,725 Thanks
    Malthusian
    In addition you took up an interview space that could have went to someone desperate for the job, nice one.
    Originally posted by ohreally
    But the job went to someone who was desperate for it eventually - we know this because only someone who is desperate would work for such a nutter. If there were two people who were desperate enough to take it, it hardly matters if the OP took an interview slot that would otherwise have gone to the other one, as there was only one job on offer.

    I tend to agree with Invisibility, we tell people every day on these boards to go to interviews if only just for the experience, and then when someone does exactly that we castigate them. I can't see that the OP has done much wrong. Employers waste the time of interviewees often enough by interviewing them even though they have already decided to employ an internal candidate or their nephew and the interview is a sham. Two wrongs don't make a right, but I can't see that much harm has been done.

    If someone's CV and covering letter wasn't persuasive enough to get them past the OP who had no interest in the job, they probably weren't going to get it.
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 14th Mar 17, 4:47 PM
    • 59,638 Posts
    • 348,339 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    Which part of "It is perfectly acceptable to withdraw after interview if you don't like what's on offer." did you not understand?

    You have quoted my post which makes the exact point you go on to preach at me and ignored the fact that the OP announced that s/he never had any intention of taking the job. Why have you done this?
    Originally posted by ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    I got confused by it to be honest
    I couldn't decide which side it was coming down on, and after reading it a few times I picked one and ran with it.

    I never said I was a written communications expert.
    • dktreesea
    • By dktreesea 14th Mar 17, 4:56 PM
    • 5,552 Posts
    • 8,667 Thanks
    dktreesea
    It's absolutely a pain in the !!!! to interview someone who has no intention of taking the job.

    However, he didn't know you had no intention of taking it. It is perfectly acceptable to withdraw after interview if you don't like what's on offer.

    So basically you wasted his time, and if he had known that, his reaction is more understandable. However as he didn't know that, then his reaction is unacceptable, from his perspective. You can't complain about it though because you have additional information that means that you know he had a point, even though he didn't know that. You are both in the wrong.
    Originally posted by ScorpiondeRooftrouser

    Mmm. What about being told the job is permanent and "no selling is involved", only to interview for the company (still telling lies) and to discover that the company collects money door to door and tries to sign people up for direct debits to various charities?!! AND it's not a regular pay packet at all but is, get, this, commission only paid 6 WEEKS in arrears.


    Interviewers lie about the job they have on offer all the time, usually to try and glam up what is a dead boring, tedious role.


    My advice is not to apply to a company until you have done some research on the company online, especially looking at the kinds of forums where former employees dish the dirt.
    • xapprenticex
    • By xapprenticex 14th Mar 17, 7:08 PM
    • 1,144 Posts
    • 1,056 Thanks
    xapprenticex
    If you made me interview you just for your amusement I'd give you a bolloking too.
    • stuart30
    • By stuart30 15th Mar 17, 10:48 AM
    • 495 Posts
    • 218 Thanks
    stuart30
    It's interesting reading these responses because as a jobseeker I've been told time and time again by tutors, friends, relatives, colleagues etc...

    "ALWAYS go to the interview, even if you don't want it! Go for the practice."

    I have always ignored this advice because I despise job interviews so I have no desire to go through one without actually wanting a job, but the idea that you should attend without real intent is quite widespread (in the education sector anyway).
    Originally posted by invisibility

    Lets hope you never have open heart surgery...how i got this job i dont know.

    Ive always been a milkman...just watched "Catch me if you can"..had interview and here i am.

    Wheres that Bone saw gone now...tut tut.
    • Fireflyaway
    • By Fireflyaway 15th Mar 17, 5:32 PM
    • 1,083 Posts
    • 1,100 Thanks
    Fireflyaway
    Doesn't sound like you would have been happy working for this guy so I say its a lucky escape!
    Interview experience is good but I wouldn't waste someone's time if I had no intention at all of taking the job. Worst case they could have turned another person down because they were going to make you an offer. That someone could be someone really in need.
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 15th Mar 17, 5:44 PM
    • 1,803 Posts
    • 2,641 Thanks
    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    Mmm. What about being told the job is permanent and "no selling is involved", only to interview for the company (still telling lies) and to discover that the company collects money door to door and tries to sign people up for direct debits to various charities?!! AND it's not a regular pay packet at all but is, get, this, commission only paid 6 WEEKS in arrears.


    Interviewers lie about the job they have on offer all the time, usually to try and glam up what is a dead boring, tedious role.


    My advice is not to apply to a company until you have done some research on the company online, especially looking at the kinds of forums where former employees dish the dirt.
    Originally posted by dktreesea

    What about that? It's very poor on the part of the company. Nothing to do with what happened here though.
    • annandale
    • By annandale 23rd Mar 17, 12:02 PM
    • 635 Posts
    • 1,555 Thanks
    annandale
    Why not just wait to see if you were offered the job? You could always have turned the offer down.
    • MABLE
    • By MABLE 23rd Mar 17, 12:08 PM
    • 3,273 Posts
    • 1,744 Thanks
    MABLE
    In my mind the interviewee could perhaps have been a lot more diplomatic and as one of the contributors said at least waited to see if OP's application was successful.

    Something to take on board for the future perhaps!
    • bazzyb
    • By bazzyb 23rd Mar 17, 12:21 PM
    • 1,011 Posts
    • 3,159 Thanks
    bazzyb
    If you are applying for a job just to develop interview skills or for the experience, then surely some kind of feedback from the interview would be a big part of that - otherwise how do you actually know if you were any good or not, or what skills need to be developed.

    Whilst I don't agree with the notion of applying for a job that you have no interest in, it would have made a lot more sense to have waited to hear back from them and then asked the employer for some constructive feedback regarding your interview.

    Going for an interview just for the sake of it, without knowing how well you performed makes zero sense.
    • jbond
    • By jbond 25th Mar 17, 3:02 PM
    • 62 Posts
    • 18 Thanks
    jbond
    Judging from the reaction you got, I think you made a wise choice.
    I know someone who goes for interviews, just to find out what the employer is like, attitude etc, perfectly acceptable thing to do!
    As annoying as it can be for an employer, behaving in that way, is totally unacceptable and just highlights their complete unprofessionalism.
    If you HAD accepted the position, if they are capable of exploding like that, what else might you have been subjected to?
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