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  • FIRST POST
    • Nookie5
    • By Nookie5 13th Mar 17, 10:37 AM
    • 7Posts
    • 1Thanks
    Nookie5
    Interviewer went berserk on me
    • #1
    • 13th Mar 17, 10:37 AM
    Interviewer went berserk on me 13th Mar 17 at 10:37 AM
    I was previously interviewing for an office junior job just to help improve my interviewing skills. After the interview, I sent a polite email to the interviewer to withdraw my application because of bad fit.

    Moments later he called to interrogate me and shouted at me for wasting his time. I hanged up on him because he was so rude.

    He then sent me a lengthy email to express his disappointment in me, highlighted how great his company is and it's my loss for withdrawing my application.

    About 10 minutes later he called again, asked if I read his email and said I'm stupid if I still want to withdraw my application after seeing how much profit they make, their reputation etc. I hanged up on him shortly after he said I'm probably withdrawing because I have mental issues, suffer from depression or something like that.
Page 1
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 13th Mar 17, 10:41 AM
    • 15,118 Posts
    • 14,764 Thanks
    Guest101
    • #2
    • 13th Mar 17, 10:41 AM
    • #2
    • 13th Mar 17, 10:41 AM
    ok, is there a question attached?
    • BJV
    • By BJV 13th Mar 17, 10:41 AM
    • 2,249 Posts
    • 3,369 Thanks
    BJV
    • #3
    • 13th Mar 17, 10:41 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Mar 17, 10:41 AM
    Wow!!!

    Have to say as an employer I actually respect the fact the you had the nerve to withdraw. Long term I think that it saved everyone a lot of time. I do sort of understand the opinion of wasting time as it does take time to consider someone for a position. So while I understand that it is good for you to take the imitative to improve it is also taking the employer out of the serious business of running the company.

    Still a little over the top???
    Happiness, Health and Wealth in that order please!
    • waamo
    • By waamo 13th Mar 17, 10:43 AM
    • 2,097 Posts
    • 2,501 Thanks
    waamo
    • #4
    • 13th Mar 17, 10:43 AM
    • #4
    • 13th Mar 17, 10:43 AM
    Do you have a question or is this just a rant out of frustration?
    This space for hire.
    • daytona0
    • By daytona0 13th Mar 17, 10:53 AM
    • 2,237 Posts
    • 2,666 Thanks
    daytona0
    • #5
    • 13th Mar 17, 10:53 AM
    • #5
    • 13th Mar 17, 10:53 AM
    What a !!!!!!!!. Would hate working with someone like that!
    • jonmoneybags
    • By jonmoneybags 13th Mar 17, 10:55 AM
    • 291 Posts
    • 248 Thanks
    jonmoneybags
    • #6
    • 13th Mar 17, 10:55 AM
    • #6
    • 13th Mar 17, 10:55 AM
    Dodged a bullet there by withdrawing from having anything to do with that company.
    SOunds like he may know a thing of two about mental problems
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 13th Mar 17, 11:22 AM
    • 2,041 Posts
    • 3,067 Thanks
    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • #7
    • 13th Mar 17, 11:22 AM
    • #7
    • 13th Mar 17, 11:22 AM
    It's absolutely a pain in the !!!! to interview someone who has no intention of taking the job.

    However, he didn't know you had no intention of taking it. It is perfectly acceptable to withdraw after interview if you don't like what's on offer.

    So basically you wasted his time, and if he had known that, his reaction is more understandable. However as he didn't know that, then his reaction is unacceptable, from his perspective. You can't complain about it though because you have additional information that means that you know he had a point, even though he didn't know that. You are both in the wrong.
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 13th Mar 17, 11:36 AM
    • 1,419 Posts
    • 1,865 Thanks
    shortcrust
    • #8
    • 13th Mar 17, 11:36 AM
    • #8
    • 13th Mar 17, 11:36 AM
    I find it difficult to dig up much sympathy. The interviewer clearly went OTT but going for a job you've no interest in just for the interview experience is a pretty rubbish thing to do.
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 13th Mar 17, 11:43 AM
    • 30,290 Posts
    • 19,161 Thanks
    DCFC79
    • #9
    • 13th Mar 17, 11:43 AM
    • #9
    • 13th Mar 17, 11:43 AM
    He did go OTT and it sounds like you dodged a bullet but can you see it from his point of view you did waste his time.

    What did you get from the interview meaning it was a bad fit ?
    Can people stop loaning money/being a guarator to family/friends, it rarely ends well and you lose out as your money is gone or you get shafted with being a guarantor.
    • Nookie5
    • By Nookie5 13th Mar 17, 11:49 AM
    • 7 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Nookie5
    He did go OTT and it sounds like you dodged a bullet but can you see it from his point of view you did waste his time.

    What did you get from the interview meaning it was a bad fit ?
    Originally posted by DCFC79
    I made up an excuse to withdraw my application. He doesn't know I never intended to work there.
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 13th Mar 17, 12:01 PM
    • 6,038 Posts
    • 7,787 Thanks
    TBagpuss
    well, their reaction was over the top and offensive, particualrly the suggestion taht you have mental health issues. If you had been serious abouthe job I'd saythat that would have been a massive red flag.

    It is inappropriate to apply for a job solely for interview experience, don't do that. However, it doesn't sound as though the interviewer knew that.

    It's up to you whether you anything further. You can just leavve it as it is, or if you wanted, you could send a letter ot e-mail to someone more senior mentioning that having interviewing for a job and then withdrawn from the process as it you felt, after the interview, it was not a good it for you, that you recieved 2 abusive phone calls and an unpleasant e-mail, and that you feel they should be aware of this.

    As an employer, I would be annoyed if I lear ned that someone had attended for an interview fora job they had no actual intetion of taking if it were offered, but despite that, I would absolutely want to know if one of my managers / interviewers was acting in this way.
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 13th Mar 17, 12:03 PM
    • 1,419 Posts
    • 1,865 Thanks
    shortcrust
    I made up an excuse to withdraw my application. He doesn't know I never intended to work there.
    Originally posted by Nookie5
    Of course he knows. I've interview hundreds of people and no one has ever withdrawn straight after interview. If it happened I'd assume I'd been messed around even if wasn't sure why.
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 13th Mar 17, 12:03 PM
    • 6,320 Posts
    • 4,841 Thanks
    ohreally
    In addition you took up an interview space that could have went to someone desperate for the job, nice one.
    • Cheeky_Monkey
    • By Cheeky_Monkey 13th Mar 17, 12:11 PM
    • 1,370 Posts
    • 2,660 Thanks
    Cheeky_Monkey
    Personally, I don't believe a word of it. This is someone who has apparently been sacked for photocopying their passport and who previously worked in security at an airport but merely stood around 'looking cool' all day - yeah right
    • Nookie5
    • By Nookie5 13th Mar 17, 12:19 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Nookie5
    Personally, I don't believe a word of it. This is someone who has apparently been sacked for photocopying their passport and who previously worked in security at an airport but merely stood around 'looking cool' all day - yeah right
    Originally posted by Cheeky_Monkey
    When you get sacked you don't blindly apply for jobs. Of course you want interview experience. Looking cool wasn't the official job description. Sums it up though.
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 13th Mar 17, 12:19 PM
    • 2,041 Posts
    • 3,067 Thanks
    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    Of course he knows. I've interview hundreds of people and no one has ever withdrawn straight after interview. If it happened I'd assume I'd been messed around even if wasn't sure why.
    Originally posted by shortcrust
    I've withdrawn during interview on more than one occasion. Never straight after, only because the last questions are usually along the lines of whether you are still interested, at which point I would have said no if I wasn't. I can easily see a situation arising where I am not entirely sure and after thinking about it decide against, though. Interviews are a two way process, unless you are interviewing the desperate.
    • neilio
    • By neilio 13th Mar 17, 1:40 PM
    • 206 Posts
    • 102 Thanks
    neilio
    I reckon Nookie5 is EatLess reincarnated.
    • invisibility
    • By invisibility 13th Mar 17, 1:45 PM
    • 20 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    invisibility
    It's interesting reading these responses because as a jobseeker I've been told time and time again by tutors, friends, relatives, colleagues etc...

    "ALWAYS go to the interview, even if you don't want it! Go for the practice."

    I have always ignored this advice because I despise job interviews so I have no desire to go through one without actually wanting a job, but the idea that you should attend without real intent is quite widespread (in the education sector anyway).
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 13th Mar 17, 2:27 PM
    • 1,897 Posts
    • 5,229 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    Of course he knows. I've interview hundreds of people and no one has ever withdrawn straight after interview. If it happened I'd assume I'd been messed around even if wasn't sure why.
    Originally posted by shortcrust
    That would never occur to me, I'd assume that the interview experience had in some way changed the applicant's mind about wanting to work there.

    It's certainly happened to me that something sounded great but the interview proved it would certainly not be!
    • Nookie5
    • By Nookie5 13th Mar 17, 2:32 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Nookie5
    It's interesting reading these responses because as a jobseeker I've been told time and time again by tutors, friends, relatives, colleagues etc...

    "ALWAYS go to the interview, even if you don't want it! Go for the practice."


    I have always ignored this advice because I despise job interviews so I have no desire to go through one without actually wanting a job, but the idea that you should attend without real intent is quite widespread (in the education sector anyway).
    Originally posted by invisibility
    Finally! People who understands and agrees with me!
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