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  • FIRST POST
    • Dynera34
    • By Dynera34 13th Mar 17, 9:28 AM
    • 5Posts
    • 1Thanks
    Dynera34
    Fake kitchen extractor hood
    • #1
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:28 AM
    Fake kitchen extractor hood 13th Mar 17 at 9:28 AM
    Greetings everyone,

    Recently we bought a house and moved in a month ago. Since then we have discovered that the extractor hood placed above the gas hob is just a metal box effectively. It sucks the air but has no hole in the wall to blow it into. (I will try to upload a photo tonight). As a result when we cook, especially when fry things, the whole downstairs is filled with smoke even when we open windows. The previous owner obviously made no mention of this even after completion. The surveyor we hired did not pick up on this either. My question is whetherI have any grounds to make a claim to the surveyor and ultimately receive funds from them to get the extractor fixed properly.

    In the survey report we had the below.
    ==========================
    Built-in fittings (built-in kitchen and other fittings, not including appliances)
    The kitchen fittings are of some age and rather dated with wear and tear. We
    assume that you will contemplate refitting these in due course. No doubt you have
    already assessed the adequacy of these, and other built-in fitments, for your own
    purposes.

    Condition Rating 2. ***
    Flexible sealants around sinks and worktops should be regularly checked and
    maintained. Damage may allow water penetration to enclosed areas beneath,
    which can cause rot and decay.

    *** Condition Rating 2 means: Defects that need repairing or replacing but are not considered to be either serious or urgent. The property must be maintained in the normal way.
    ===========================

    Any advice will be appreciated.

    Many thanks
    Oz
Page 1
    • casper_g
    • By casper_g 13th Mar 17, 9:32 AM
    • 1,023 Posts
    • 880 Thanks
    casper_g
    • #2
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:32 AM
    • #2
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:32 AM
    Many cooker hoods are recirculating ones that are supposed to filter the air and spit it out again into the kitchen. I don't think you'll get anywhere with this. Move on. Even if there was any liability with anyone, it wouldn't be worth the time and effort to pursue it. Not by a long chalk.
    • 3mph
    • By 3mph 13th Mar 17, 9:33 AM
    • 146 Posts
    • 148 Thanks
    3mph
    • #3
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:33 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:33 AM
    But is it an extractor that puts the fumes through a filter and back into the room since there is no external walls. Lots of houses and particular flats have these.

    Edit - beat me to it
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 13th Mar 17, 9:33 AM
    • 5,151 Posts
    • 4,808 Thanks
    davidmcn
    • #4
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:33 AM
    • #4
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:33 AM
    I can't see anything there which says the hood extracts the fumes, and the surveyor's not going to test appliances anyway.

    (Non-extracting) filter hoods are pretty common - that's what both my current and previous kitchen have. Have you tried replacing the filter?
    • vuvuzela
    • By vuvuzela 13th Mar 17, 9:35 AM
    • 3,218 Posts
    • 3,738 Thanks
    vuvuzela
    • #5
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:35 AM
    • #5
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:35 AM
    As the above 2 people say, it's a filter-based one to remove (some) smoke and fat particles from the air. You have no claim against anyone for this.
    • ComicGeek
    • By ComicGeek 13th Mar 17, 9:37 AM
    • 102 Posts
    • 59 Thanks
    ComicGeek
    • #6
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:37 AM
    • #6
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:37 AM
    So it's probably a recirculation hood then - designed to take in greasy air whilst cooking and uses a filter to clean the air a bit. Have you checked the condition of the filter, and cleaned/replaced it?


    If the kitchen is 'of some age' as noted in the survey report, then you can't assume that it would be up to current Building Regulation standards. Absolutely zero chance of getting anywhere with a claim from the surveyor!


    You'll need to install your own fan to deal with cooking smells - either a standalone fan somewhere close to the cooker, or replace the existing recirculation hood with an extract hood.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 13th Mar 17, 9:38 AM
    • 6,295 Posts
    • 6,667 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    • #7
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:38 AM
    • #7
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:38 AM
    Replace the filter.
    • Niv
    • By Niv 13th Mar 17, 9:38 AM
    • 1,451 Posts
    • 1,289 Thanks
    Niv
    • #8
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:38 AM
    • #8
    • 13th Mar 17, 9:38 AM
    Greetings everyone,

    Recently we bought a house and moved in a month ago. Since then we have discovered that the extractor hood placed above the gas hob is just a metal box effectively. It sucks the air but has no hole in the wall to blow it into. (I will try to upload a photo tonight). As a result when we cook, especially when fry things, the whole downstairs is filled with smoke even when we open windows. The previous owner obviously made no mention of this even after completion. The surveyor we hired did not pick up on this either. My question is whetherI have any grounds to make a claim to the surveyor and ultimately receive funds from them to get the extractor fixed properly.

    In the survey report we had the below.
    ==========================
    Built-in fittings (built-in kitchen and other fittings, not including appliances)
    The kitchen fittings are of some age and rather dated with wear and tear. We
    assume that you will contemplate refitting these in due course. No doubt you have
    already assessed the adequacy of these, and other built-in fitments, for your own
    purposes.

    Condition Rating 2. ***
    Flexible sealants around sinks and worktops should be regularly checked and
    maintained. Damage may allow water penetration to enclosed areas beneath,
    which can cause rot and decay.

    *** Condition Rating 2 means: Defects that need repairing or replacing but are not considered to be either serious or urgent. The property must be maintained in the normal way.
    ===========================

    Any advice will be appreciated.

    Many thanks
    Oz
    Originally posted by Dynera34

    Replace your cooker hood filter.
    YNWA

    Mortgage free by 58.
    • burnsguitarman
    • By burnsguitarman 13th Mar 17, 10:23 AM
    • 707 Posts
    • 423 Thanks
    burnsguitarman
    • #9
    • 13th Mar 17, 10:23 AM
    • #9
    • 13th Mar 17, 10:23 AM
    If its on an outside wall, its a pretty simple job, to get it vented to outside. It sounds like its recirculating at the moment.
    • rtho782
    • By rtho782 13th Mar 17, 10:29 AM
    • 915 Posts
    • 590 Thanks
    rtho782
    Bear in mind the "filter" can just be a wire mesh.

    These things are pointless, and more for show and/or noise generation than anything else, but are actually quite common.
    Deposit Saved since 01/12/15: 13,000 / 15,000 House Bought!

    Debt Cleared since 01/12/15: 6,000 / 7,500
    • cajef
    • By cajef 13th Mar 17, 10:44 AM
    • 4,318 Posts
    • 3,446 Thanks
    cajef
    It is not a 'fake kitchen extractor' because as everyone has stated it recirculates and does not extract.

    Most have metal or carbon filters that need cleaning or replacing regularly.
    I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
    • JP08
    • By JP08 13th Mar 17, 10:50 AM
    • 803 Posts
    • 855 Thanks
    JP08
    Alternatively it's a half finished job - the vendor did fit a proper extraction hood, but failed to resolve the routing of the ducting to an ouside wall ...
    • ProDave
    • By ProDave 13th Mar 17, 11:10 AM
    • 112 Posts
    • 176 Thanks
    ProDave
    Do check it actually has the filters fitted.

    There will usually be two sorts of filter. The mesh sheet that you see is a grease trap, and when that gets too greasy you wash that in your dishwasher.

    Remove the mesh sheet(s) and inside you will see the fan mechanism. There should be a round black carbon filter on the intake to the fan, sometimes there are two of them, one on each side. If you can't see them and instead can see the fan blades then someone forgot the carbon filter units.

    Even if you have the carbon filters, they will need changing from time to time as they get clogged.
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 13th Mar 17, 2:06 PM
    • 1,492 Posts
    • 2,115 Thanks
    ReadingTim
    In the survey report we had the below.
    ==========================
    Built-in fittings (built-in kitchen and other fittings, not including appliances)
    The kitchen fittings are of some age and rather dated with wear and tear. We
    assume that you will contemplate refitting these in due course. No doubt you have already assessed the adequacy of these, and other built-in fitments, for your own purposes.
    Originally posted by Dynera34
    So, did you assess the adequacy of the kitchen fittings as suggested? Nb. - probably best to do this before you buy the property, not afterwards.

    Also, on what basis do you think the hood is a built in fitting, rather than an appliance? Most things which have a plug on them are the latter, rather than the former.

    Finally, if "the whole downstairs is filled with smoke even when we open windows" when you cook, you probably need to have a word with the cook, rather than the surveyor...
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 13th Mar 17, 2:16 PM
    • 9,199 Posts
    • 7,079 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    Finally, if "the whole downstairs is filled with smoke even when we open windows" when you cook, you probably need to have a word with the cook, rather than the surveyor...
    Originally posted by ReadingTim
    Hahahahahaha
    • rach_k
    • By rach_k 13th Mar 17, 2:24 PM
    • 882 Posts
    • 1,487 Thanks
    rach_k
    The extractor we have can be fitted either way - to vent to outside or with 2 carbon filters inside it. We have the filters and it works well so maybe you need to reassess how you're cooking things if you're getting a lot of smoke! You could also try Googling the make and model to see if it's one that can be fitted either way, then pay (yourself) so get it swapped over.
    • TheGardener
    • By TheGardener 13th Mar 17, 6:37 PM
    • 1,894 Posts
    • 1,750 Thanks
    TheGardener
    I know this might sound like a dumb question - but is the hood on an exterior wall? - and if not - where did you imagine the ducting was hidden?

    The last 3 kitchens I've had all has this sort of re-circulation filter - its very common.
    I'd echo other posters who suggest a) checking the filters and b) making some adjustments to your cooking style - there is no reason for a house to be full of smoke when cooking whether you have an extractor or not?
    • nickcc
    • By nickcc 13th Mar 17, 7:42 PM
    • 1,654 Posts
    • 730 Thanks
    nickcc
    The extractor doesn't always need to be on an external wall as you can have ducting in the ceiling space to an outside wall.
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