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  • FIRST POST
    • LMCox
    • By LMCox 12th Mar 17, 5:37 PM
    • 1Posts
    • 0Thanks
    LMCox
    Tax Relief for Commuting to Work Costs
    • #1
    • 12th Mar 17, 5:37 PM
    Tax Relief for Commuting to Work Costs 12th Mar 17 at 5:37 PM
    I’ve started an online petition to allow commuters to claim income tax relief on the cost of travelling to work. Commuters spend their own money to travel to work. Fuel & public transport costs rise and it costs more per year to get to work.
    House prices force people out of areas & make more expensive commutes. Where workers live & where companies are located could be positively influenced by such a move. If all workers had the opportunity to claim tax relief on their annual commute this would ease the housing market, create job mobility and employment in more regions. I think it’s unfair and unreasonable that hard working people are taxed to travel to their place of work.

    If you agree please visit the UK Government and Parliament Petitions website and search for Allow Tax Relief for Commuting to Work Costs to sign the petition.
Page 1
    • MacMickster
    • By MacMickster 12th Mar 17, 5:45 PM
    • 2,338 Posts
    • 6,806 Thanks
    MacMickster
    • #2
    • 12th Mar 17, 5:45 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Mar 17, 5:45 PM
    Sorry but I completely disagree with this.

    The pay of any employment should be sufficient either for the employee to live locally, or to cover the cost of the commute if they don't live locally.

    This would merely transfer costs from the employer, who could then pay less, to the taxpayer - more specifically to those taxpayers who don't have an expensive commute.
    "When the people fear the government there is tyranny, when the government fears the people there is liberty." - Thomas Jefferson
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 12th Mar 17, 6:18 PM
    • 9,067 Posts
    • 6,899 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 17, 6:18 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 17, 6:18 PM
    I don't think it matters how many (perhaps that should be few) people sign your petition, I cannot see this happening.
    • dlmcr
    • By dlmcr 12th Mar 17, 6:28 PM
    • 96 Posts
    • 96 Thanks
    dlmcr
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 17, 6:28 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 17, 6:28 PM
    You say that house prices force people out of areas and into long expensive commutes. The issue of expensive and arduous commuting is created by high house prices not the cause of it. If you create the tax relief you aim for then house prices will rise by the difference so you are no better off. In general a) we are too London centric so the vast majority of the economy is based in the south east, b) we have commoditised housing to the extent that a "normal" person cannot afford to buy in many places south of a line between around Bristol and Cambridge - plus govt not bothered about sorting the prblem out which they could do if they wanted to , and c) employers themselves are part of the problem preferring to rent expensive office space in expensive parts of the country and then forcing workers to physically come in every day rather than trusting them to work remotely.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 12th Mar 17, 6:41 PM
    • 3,320 Posts
    • 3,430 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 17, 6:41 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 17, 6:41 PM
    If tax on everything was scrapped it would make things cheaper, but where would the funds required by Government come from?
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 12th Mar 17, 8:08 PM
    • 5,968 Posts
    • 4,513 Thanks
    ohreally
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 17, 8:08 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 17, 8:08 PM
    Pass this cost onto the tax payer rather than open discussions with the employers for cost of living uprates.
    • Wayne O Mac
    • By Wayne O Mac 12th Mar 17, 9:02 PM
    • 174 Posts
    • 225 Thanks
    Wayne O Mac
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 17, 9:02 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 17, 9:02 PM
    I've started an online petition to force Margot Robbie to marry me.

    It stands as much chance of success as yours.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 12th Mar 17, 9:08 PM
    • 28,018 Posts
    • 16,790 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #8
    • 12th Mar 17, 9:08 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Mar 17, 9:08 PM
    Commuting should be taxed higher not lower.
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 13th Mar 17, 6:30 AM
    • 14,676 Posts
    • 8,108 Thanks
    motorguy
    • #9
    • 13th Mar 17, 6:30 AM
    • #9
    • 13th Mar 17, 6:30 AM
    Commuting should be taxed higher not lower.
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    And what would that achieve?
    Regards

    Paul
    • caronoel
    • By caronoel 13th Mar 17, 6:44 AM
    • 664 Posts
    • 860 Thanks
    caronoel
    Who will pay for this tax rebate for suburban dwellers?

    In my corner of leaft Surrey, first class on thr trains on my route are occupied by many contractors and self employed.

    If anything, thier tax free commute should be withdrawn rather than opening it up to all and sundry.
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 13th Mar 17, 9:42 AM
    • 14,676 Posts
    • 8,108 Thanks
    motorguy
    Who will pay for this tax rebate for suburban dwellers?

    In my corner of leaft Surrey, first class on thr trains on my route are occupied by many contractors and self employed.

    If anything, thier tax free commute should be withdrawn rather than opening it up to all and sundry.
    Originally posted by caronoel
    If they're commuting from their office to another place of work, then thats quite normal and why wouldnt they claim expenses?

    I take it when you are asked to visit another office or do training off site, you submit an expense claim for your travel?
    Last edited by motorguy; 13-03-2017 at 9:45 AM.
    Regards

    Paul
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 13th Mar 17, 9:47 AM
    • 28,018 Posts
    • 16,790 Thanks
    getmore4less
    Commuting should be taxed higher not lower.
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    And what would that achieve?
    Originally posted by motorguy
    We need to encourage the employer/worker distances to get shorter not longer.

    massive benefits all round.

    Most places exist because housing was build where the work was we need to return to that model rather than housing people further and further from where they work.
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 13th Mar 17, 9:55 AM
    • 14,676 Posts
    • 8,108 Thanks
    motorguy
    We need to encourage the employer/worker distances to get shorter not longer.

    massive benefits all round.

    Most places exist because housing was build where the work was we need to return to that model rather than housing people further and further from where they work.
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    Of course there are yes.

    All very nice in theory but taxing people who have to commute (what you consider) a longer distance is hardly the way to do it is it?

    Bearing in mind :-
    • They're paying their travel costs out of their net pay, so they've been taxed already on it (perhaps at 40%)
    • The fuel they buy has fuel duty and VAT applied to it, so they're paying TAX a further twice on that.
    • If they buy a train ticket, they're paying VAT on that already.
    Regards

    Paul
    • bugslet
    • By bugslet 13th Mar 17, 9:56 AM
    • 4,916 Posts
    • 24,933 Thanks
    bugslet
    If they're commuting from their office to another place of work, then thats quite normal and why wouldnt they claim expenses?

    I take it when you are asked to visit another office or do training off site, you submit an expense claim for your travel?
    Originally posted by motorguy
    I took it that caronoel was referring to people just heading into work at a static location in which case there is a point. Working off-site, is a different kettle of fish altogether and then fair enough, claim expenses.
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 13th Mar 17, 10:37 AM
    • 14,676 Posts
    • 8,108 Thanks
    motorguy
    I took it that caronoel was referring to people just heading into work at a static location in which case there is a point. Working off-site, is a different kettle of fish altogether and then fair enough, claim expenses.
    Originally posted by bugslet
    I dont know of any tax legislation that allows you to claim for your commute to work?
    Regards

    Paul
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 13th Mar 17, 9:04 PM
    • 523 Posts
    • 332 Thanks
    Tarambor
    London problem, don't care. Costs me just £12.50 a week to do a 20 miles a day round trip which takes me 15 minutes each way because I don't live in London.
    • caronoel
    • By caronoel 14th Mar 17, 7:55 AM
    • 664 Posts
    • 860 Thanks
    caronoel
    Just googled it: 14 signatures so far.

    Only another 99,986 to go.
    • phill99
    • By phill99 14th Mar 17, 5:50 PM
    • 7,739 Posts
    • 6,977 Thanks
    phill99
    Struth....
    Eat vegetables and fear no creditors, rather than eat duck and hide.
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