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  • FIRST POST
    • Beenie
    • By Beenie 12th Mar 17, 4:15 PM
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    Beenie
    KonMari question
    • #1
    • 12th Mar 17, 4:15 PM
    KonMari question 12th Mar 17 at 4:15 PM
    I have obviously noticed the long-running thread, but thought I would ask this question. There must be other people who aren't too sure about this method, and don't want to plow through hundreds of pages.

    So, the question is: can someone please describe simply what this method is about? It can't just be tidying up - that couldn't keep a thread running over months and months.....could it?
Page 1
    • luxor4t
    • By luxor4t 12th Mar 17, 4:24 PM
    • 9,628 Posts
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    luxor4t
    • #2
    • 12th Mar 17, 4:24 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Mar 17, 4:24 PM
    This might help: http://www.today.com/series/one-small-thing/life-changing-magic-tidying-testing-marie-kondos-method-t21356
    I can cook and sew, make flowers grow.
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 12th Mar 17, 4:44 PM
    • 10,925 Posts
    • 210,491 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 17, 4:44 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 17, 4:44 PM
    It starts from the pov of deciding what to keep rather than what to get rid of.

    You gather up all the things of one category together in one place at one time. Holding each item, you read your emotions about it. Does it spark joy? If so, a keeper, if not on its way out.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • VJsmum
    • By VJsmum 12th Mar 17, 5:25 PM
    • 4,652 Posts
    • 66,070 Thanks
    VJsmum
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 17, 5:25 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 17, 5:25 PM
    And, join the thread. Really, do. We're nice

    Seriously, some of us are a couple of years in and still struggle occasionally. But it does work and we all help each other. And for some of us, it truly has been 'life changing'. i gave up my job and started a PhD....

    there's a few new people joined recently, so you wouldn't be alone.
    You're out with a friend in the capital, I'm a thousand leagues under the sea
    You're hovering worriedly over your eggs, And I'm pondering trees
    I'm wandering long, And I'm pondering trees
    For you and me
    Guy Garvey
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 12th Mar 17, 6:08 PM
    • 22,338 Posts
    • 45,887 Thanks
    VfM4meplse
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 17, 6:08 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 17, 6:08 PM
    Let me take you back to my post that kicked it off a couple of years ago:

    I read this book a few days ago having heard about it late last year.

    There is a lot of nonsense in this book (of the "possessions have energy", "thank your handbag every day for working so hard" variety), but amongst all that there are a few principals that do make sense, and I'm stunned to say have actually rubbed off on me! I've started this thread as the insights from this book would get lost within the decluttering thread (which I think is brilliantly inspirational, btw).

    - firstly, discard. Hold the item and ask yourself, does this item bring you joy? If not, get rid. I struggled with this one at first because something can be of use and I can remember how much each and everything cost me! So I removed of some superficial stuff and then got a taste for it, I just kept on going for a couple of hours but didn't venture anywhere near my clothes. Despite this resolve, I suddenly found myself going through my wardrobe this evening and letting go of expensive items of clothing that do me no favours and I wouldn't actually miss so do not risk buying again.

    - secondly, forget about additional storage solutions. This does make sense - law of supply and demand, etc - because it means that you just buy more stuff. From bitter experience, I know this to be true.

    - store things differently. Vertical storage means everything is more visible, storing things stacked in top of each other means space gets taken up inefficiently. Aim to create a rectangle of the given item of clothing and then fold and store like a sushi roll (nothing on top of it), Every piece of clothing has a "give" point at which it will stand up (thinner materials will need more folds). Search for "Marie Kondo folding" on YouTube to see how it's done.

    - tidy in one go, rather than a room at a time. "One go" could mean over 6 months - the point is tidy all the same family of objects (eg clothes, books, kitchen utensils etc) together in one go. The key here is having everything of that group in one place rather than scattered around in different places.

    - ensure everything has a designated place. That way you're not lumbered with tidying all the time, you automatically return any given item to where it belongs. Strangely, this has really worked for me, from encouraging me to do the washing up to itching to clear all surfaces! Weird but true.

    - don't stockpile. I can't help this, esp with toiletries - the thought of running out of toothpaste, deodorant, shower gel and handwash fills me with dread, and I love a bargain. The truth is its not a disaster if you do run out, we have 24/7 supermarkets (in cities and suburbs, at least) so nothing is too far out of reach. Where stuff is in units, I can calculate how long it will last me...but really, what is the point? This stuff belongs in a shop. What was anathema to me after a lifetime of hoarding such items seems to have rubbed off on me

    What is even odder is that getting rid of stuff in this way is inducing a sense of well-being! Try it for yourself before you admit me to a psychiatric unit.

    So well done, Marie Kondo. For all my skepticism it is paying off

    If you haven’t already, join the forum to reply!


    This Forum tip was included in MoneySavingExpert.com's weekly email!
    Originally posted by VfM4meplse
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
    • Beenie
    • By Beenie 12th Mar 17, 6:08 PM
    • 1,025 Posts
    • 1,104 Thanks
    Beenie
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 17, 6:08 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 17, 6:08 PM
    I am really interested in this concept.

    We are slowly becoming overwhelmed with 'stuff' and every nook and cranny, every shelf, every cupboard, is crammed. It would be a nightmare task to empty them all. We are in our early sixties and have a lifetime's collection of books, holiday souvenirs, inherited junk, old shoes etc. etc.
    I think I will skip on to the main thread and get some ideas and support!
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 12th Mar 17, 6:10 PM
    • 22,338 Posts
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    VfM4meplse
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 17, 6:10 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 17, 6:10 PM
    Btw I have since read in "Stuffocation" that untidiness raises cortisol levels, which is why feel stressed out in disorder. I can relate to that!
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 12th Mar 17, 6:28 PM
    • 10,925 Posts
    • 210,491 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    • #8
    • 12th Mar 17, 6:28 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Mar 17, 6:28 PM
    I am really interested in this concept.

    We are slowly becoming overwhelmed with 'stuff' and every nook and cranny, every shelf, every cupboard, is crammed. It would be a nightmare task to empty them all. We are in our early sixties and have a lifetime's collection of books, holiday souvenirs, inherited junk, old shoes etc. etc.
    I think I will skip on to the main thread and get some ideas and support!
    Originally posted by Beenie
    Please come play with us on the main thread, we're a very friendly bunch and would love to have you.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Paulaviki
    • By Paulaviki 12th Mar 17, 8:45 PM
    • 280 Posts
    • 295 Thanks
    Paulaviki
    • #9
    • 12th Mar 17, 8:45 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Mar 17, 8:45 PM
    I just used the folding technique to sort out my husbands tahurt drawers after reading this. Amazing! I'm definitely a convert to folding clothes like that, will be doing all our drawers over the next week.
    • melanzana
    • By melanzana 12th Mar 17, 8:57 PM
    • 2,273 Posts
    • 6,398 Thanks
    melanzana
    A big YES to the decluttering theory of Kondo.

    But a big NO to the folding techique. That lasted five minutes. Sorry about that.
    • MMF007
    • By MMF007 12th Mar 17, 9:56 PM
    • 685 Posts
    • 16,940 Thanks
    MMF007
    Don't be overwhelmed!
    Choose a category, say shoes, get them ALL together in one room, pick up a pair and feel whether they spark joy (the concept is broad, they may be joyful because you love gardening in them, not just because they are gorgeous!). Any that don't spark should be 'released' from your custody.

    I find it helps to have in mind a way to release items - start a bag to fill for taking to charity shop, have a box to give to young relative for car booting, ebay, auction, etc. Do not be afraid to just dispose via the bin or local tip if it means you are freed of the caretaking responsibility and the bruden on your precious space!

    Once the decisions are made take the items out of the door, don't let them hang round sniggering at you.

    You will be amazed that once you do one category you will feel lighter, liberated and more able to tackle other categories. Word of warning, leave really emotional categories until last, when you have honed your skills!

    Finally, do read at least some of the 2015 thread and then join us on the 2016 thread (we have yet to update to 2017 in the title post, which makes me chuckle, given that we are getting our house in order). We'd love you to join in, it is inspirational to read of successes from newbies as well as old hands.

    M
    I have changed my work-life balance to a life-work balance.
    • Biggles
    • By Biggles 12th Mar 17, 10:09 PM
    • 7,275 Posts
    • 4,687 Thanks
    Biggles
    Well, I'm glad I read this thread, as I now know what 'KonMari' means.

    I'm still baffled as to why it needs a book to teach common sense - and why, if the book's written by Marie Kondo, the thread's called KonMari. But it's info I can do without.
    • VJsmum
    • By VJsmum 13th Mar 17, 7:55 AM
    • 4,652 Posts
    • 66,070 Thanks
    VJsmum
    A big YES to the decluttering theory of Kondo.

    But a big NO to the folding techique. That lasted five minutes. Sorry about that.
    Originally posted by melanzana

    It really does save a lot of space, and bizarrely, saves time as you can see everything at once.

    But I agree, it does seem a bit OTT
    Last edited by VJsmum; 13-03-2017 at 8:36 AM.
    You're out with a friend in the capital, I'm a thousand leagues under the sea
    You're hovering worriedly over your eggs, And I'm pondering trees
    I'm wandering long, And I'm pondering trees
    For you and me
    Guy Garvey
    • oldtractor
    • By oldtractor 13th Mar 17, 8:31 AM
    • 2,221 Posts
    • 14,980 Thanks
    oldtractor
    love the folding part. it definitely helps. tidy draws and shelves and I can see most things right away. easy to find and easy to spot if too much stuff is creeping back in.
    Trying for 10 a day
    • elsien
    • By elsien 13th Mar 17, 9:15 AM
    • 14,544 Posts
    • 36,033 Thanks
    elsien
    Contemplating gathering everything from one category in one place before I even start disposing of it makes me want to shove it all back in the cupboard and forget about it for the next 12 months.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • oldtractor
    • By oldtractor 13th Mar 17, 10:50 AM
    • 2,221 Posts
    • 14,980 Thanks
    oldtractor
    Contemplating gathering everything from one category in one place before I even start disposing of it makes me want to shove it all back in the cupboard and forget about it for the next 12 months.
    Originally posted by elsien
    then don't, just do one shelf or draw. make life easy .
    Trying for 10 a day
    • Siebrie
    • By Siebrie 14th Mar 17, 8:09 PM
    • 829 Posts
    • 14,071 Thanks
    Siebrie
    There is a list with smaller categories, so not 'clothes', but 'vests'. It helps if you can start, continue, and finish a category in one go.

    I like having less choice, it makes it easy to get dressed, easy to put away, easy to clean, easy to goof off for an afternoon without any niggly feelings of guilt.
    Still a womble 2017 #25 6085,65= 5129.77
    Wombling Free 2016 #2 3.483,31= 2,969.05
    • greenbee
    • By greenbee 14th Mar 17, 8:12 PM
    • 11,913 Posts
    • 212,815 Thanks
    greenbee
    Like lots of others, I started with knickers Nothing like a tidy knicker drawer to motivate you. Now ALL My drawers are beautifully tidy and stay that way. It's weird. But very satisfying. It also makes packing for work trips very easy, and unpacking and living in hotels.
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 14th Mar 17, 8:20 PM
    • 10,925 Posts
    • 210,491 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    You could start with a sub-category if the volume is overwhelming. Such as all long-sleeved tops, or all thrillers.

    I like the folding and am finding it really useful because I can SEE what I've got in the drawers, as opposed to losing things under other things, and then having them emerge all crushed, creased and tragic. Reloading the drawer is so easy, shove the contents to one side and add the returned onto the end of the line. And packing is a breeze as the neat little packets come out and into the case with no fuss or muss.

    Unless you've got shedloads of space for hanging clothes (I just have one 3 ft rail) I guess you'll be folding things to put them into drawers anyway, so might as well do it in an efficient way.

    But that's my two'pennorth and others should do what makes them happy.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • kittie
    • By kittie 15th Mar 17, 7:04 AM
    • 10,624 Posts
    • 56,835 Thanks
    kittie
    I am really interested in this concept.

    We are slowly becoming overwhelmed with 'stuff' and every nook and cranny, every shelf, every cupboard, is crammed. It would be a nightmare task to empty them all. We are in our early sixties and have a lifetime's collection of books, holiday souvenirs, inherited junk, old shoes etc. etc.
    I think I will skip on to the main thread and get some ideas and support!
    Originally posted by Beenie
    Been there, done that beenie. Now nine years on, started with basic de-cluttering with no name. Then my husband died two years ago and I found the main MK thread, which has been invaluable, uplifting and positive, enabled me to move forwards. Had to start slow with nibbles here and there, starting with underwear, like almost everyone. Now I have a home with free flowing good energy and very easy to clean and run, it is so worth doing
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