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  • FIRST POST
    • SallySunshine
    • By SallySunshine 12th Mar 17, 2:33 PM
    • 543Posts
    • 157Thanks
    SallySunshine
    Should we replace DG units before we market house?
    • #1
    • 12th Mar 17, 2:33 PM
    Should we replace DG units before we market house? 12th Mar 17 at 2:33 PM
    We are thinking of moving house, it was built 13yrs ago and has wooden d.g. windows.
    About 2 yrs ago , one of the windows started misting up, now there are about 6 misting.

    We had a firm out to give us a quote, both for replacing the glass units only and also for full renewal to plastic units, outer doors etc. Came to £7k, not bad for 17 windows and 2 doors plus french windows.

    It really didn't seem feasible to just replace the glass as in theory they may all go eventually.
    there are only 4 houses in the development, all with dark stained wooden units.
    The outside of the house is white roughcast render so the window colour would look no different from the other houses if we went with a rosewood colour, however that colour looks nearly black on the inside of the house.
    The other alternative is to have a white interior and a rosewood exterior, but since all the interior woodwork,doors etc are stained mahogany, Im not sure about the contrast.

    That is why we held off choosing to renew the D.G., now we are in a dilemma about what to tell prospective buyers, do we point out the misting which can been seen on certain days and offer to decrease the asking price, or state a lower price to start with , mentioning that the windows will need replacing eventually.

    I'm really cross as the wood itself is in great condition,
Page 1
    • ProDave
    • By ProDave 12th Mar 17, 2:40 PM
    • 79 Posts
    • 151 Thanks
    ProDave
    • #2
    • 12th Mar 17, 2:40 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Mar 17, 2:40 PM
    just replace the glass units. We had two done (because the glass was cracked) for £250
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 12th Mar 17, 2:46 PM
    • 2,016 Posts
    • 2,142 Thanks
    glasgowdan
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 17, 2:46 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 17, 2:46 PM
    Spend as little as possible. You won't add value by replacing them but might get an easier sale if everything about the house is excellent.

    The buyer's surveys will highlight this.
    • casper_g
    • By casper_g 12th Mar 17, 3:41 PM
    • 996 Posts
    • 858 Thanks
    casper_g
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 17, 3:41 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 17, 3:41 PM
    If you don't replace the failed units a lot of viewers will assume they'll have to spend £5000-10000 replacing all the windows, so fixing them should help the house to sell more easily.

    You wouldn't recoup the cost of replacing everything though.

    I don't understand why you say "It really didn't seem feasible to just replace the glass as in theory they may all go eventually." If all the units go, then replace them all! You'll have a lot less cost and disruption than if you replace the frames too. Why would you do that when, as you say, they're in great condition?
    Last edited by casper_g; 12-03-2017 at 3:43 PM.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 12th Mar 17, 4:12 PM
    • 34,801 Posts
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    silvercar
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 17, 4:12 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 17, 4:12 PM
    I understand, if there is a dilemma on whether to change the frames and what to, it is often easier to wait and see if they will need replacing.

    Personally, I wouldn't bother doing anything. Let the new buyer decide what they want to do. If you are not buying a new build, you con't expect to buy a perfect property. If that is all a buyer has to worry about they are doing well.
    • kerri gt
    • By kerri gt 12th Mar 17, 7:27 PM
    • 7,291 Posts
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    kerri gt
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 17, 7:27 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 17, 7:27 PM
    I wouldn't bother, we viewed a house when we were looking with the DG unts clearly blown and in need of replacing. The vendor was aware of this, I think it was in the house notes too. It didn't put us off and wasn't the reason we didn't put an offer in on the house. Also, what you choose to do might not necessarily be what a propepective buyer would want. Price accordingly, be upfront about the Windows needing replacing and leave it as a blank canvas for the new owners.
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    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 12th Mar 17, 8:23 PM
    • 1,690 Posts
    • 2,058 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 17, 8:23 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 17, 8:23 PM
    Replacing just the glass is the cheapest option and it will mean that any buyers can't use the blown windows as a reason to lower their offer.
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 12th Mar 17, 9:05 PM
    • 3,420 Posts
    • 2,995 Thanks
    Hoploz
    • #8
    • 12th Mar 17, 9:05 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Mar 17, 9:05 PM
    Yes agree - replace the glass and then the house looks cared for. If you don't people think you're the sort who doesn't bother with maintenance so they'll wonder what else you haven't bothered with!

    If the timber is good all fine, job done.

    Btw I have rosewood outside as it suits our cottage, with white inside, which really brightens the light from the windows. There are a couple of old windows which are mahogany both in and out, and it really sucks the light out dramatically!

    A buyer might even paint the insides but that's up to them
    • jansus
    • By jansus 12th Mar 17, 9:32 PM
    • 12,240 Posts
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    jansus
    • #9
    • 12th Mar 17, 9:32 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Mar 17, 9:32 PM
    We put our house on the market with blown windows, only a couple didn't need changing and the EA advised us to leave them.
    When our buyer came to view although i didn't refer to them specifically i said i realised the house needed "some work", he offered £2,000 less than the asking price which we happily accepted, it would have cost us considerably more to have them done ourselves.
    • eddddy
    • By eddddy 13th Mar 17, 7:11 AM
    • 4,286 Posts
    • 3,949 Thanks
    eddddy
    An EA I spoke to recently put replacing misted double glazing units as one of the top things to do before marketing a property.

    He said that viewers always want to gaze out of windows, and misted units are a real turn-off.


    FWIW, if you google 'double glazing unit repairs' there are firms that claim to fix misted units. I know somebody who was very pleased with the results.

    But I don't know relative costs of repair vs replacement or how long a repair lasts for - and I suspect there are good repairers and bad repairers.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 13th Mar 17, 8:02 AM
    • 5,695 Posts
    • 5,939 Thanks
    AnotherJoe

    That is why we held off choosing to renew the D.G., now we are in a dilemma about what to tell prospective buyers, do we point out the misting which can been seen on certain days and offer to decrease the asking price, or state a lower price to start with , mentioning that the windows will need replacing eventually.

    I'm really cross as the wood itself is in great condition,
    Originally posted by SallySunshine
    Neither of these. You'll just replace the failed units now, for a few hundred quid..
    • Rain Shadow
    • By Rain Shadow 13th Mar 17, 8:26 AM
    • 1,660 Posts
    • 2,911 Thanks
    Rain Shadow
    Another vote for replacing the failed units. It's cheap, they take about ten minutes max each to change and they dramatically improve the appearance of the room.
    You can pick your friends and you can pick your nose but you can't pick your friend's nose.
    • SallySunshine
    • By SallySunshine 13th Mar 17, 7:10 PM
    • 543 Posts
    • 157 Thanks
    SallySunshine
    Thanks for all the helpful replies, I'd already looked at having just the glass replaced and have read mixed reviews about them.
    If and when we move I would never , ever have wooden units again.
    We had UPVC windows in the last 2 houses, and never had a problem with misting, both of the units in the properties were over 20 yrs old.
    The frames etc in this house were made by the joiners and the glass fitted by a local window firm, so no come back from anyone as I can't remember getting a guarantee but it doesn't really matter now as it is well over the house builders guarantee.
    Of the 4 houses built, at least 3 of them have now got some misting , just starting in them not sure what they are going to do about them.
    I might ask another d.g. Firm how much they would quote to replace the glass, not impressed now as the 3/4 glass in oneof the French Windows has started misting.
    The wooden frames are in good condition, have been repainted twice in 13yrs but are due to be touched up again this year, hopefully just the windowsills need doing.
    I don't think it is a small job replacing the glass, frames dismantled and possibly damaged and so will probably need repainting.

    My OH. Keeps telling me to stop worrying but that's me I'm afraid.
    • casper_g
    • By casper_g 13th Mar 17, 7:26 PM
    • 996 Posts
    • 858 Thanks
    casper_g
    If and when we move I would never , ever have wooden units again.
    We had UPVC windows in the last 2 houses, and never had a problem with misting, both of the units in the properties were over 20 yrs old.
    Originally posted by SallySunshine
    Are glazing units I wooden frames more likely to fail then? I think you might need a bigger sample size than three houses to show that conclusively. I've seen plenty of failed units with UPVC frames and 20-year-old timber frames with no problems.
    • SallySunshine
    • By SallySunshine 13th Mar 17, 9:56 PM
    • 543 Posts
    • 157 Thanks
    SallySunshine
    Casper, you're probably right, I think it's just that I'm fed up with the situation.
    This is our 9th and most expensive house so far, otherwise beautifully crafted and ironically the one we've lived in longest.

    My husband actually measured and had made an extra 4 extra Plastic windows in our last house, but he's not so keen on having new glass fitted in our wooden frames, he just doesn't believe they can get the seals right.
    Perhaps I can persuade him to try a small window, not sure about Rain Shadow's 10min though.
    It'll take longer than that to remove the beading.
    • Rain Shadow
    • By Rain Shadow 13th Mar 17, 10:00 PM
    • 1,660 Posts
    • 2,911 Thanks
    Rain Shadow
    Casper, you're probably right, I think it's just that I'm fed up with the situation.
    This is our 9th and most expensive house so far, otherwise beautifully crafted and ironically the one we've lived in longest.

    My husband actually measured and had made an extra 4 extra Plastic windows in our last house, but he's not so keen on having new glass fitted in our wooden frames, he just doesn't believe they can get the seals right.
    Perhaps I can persuade him to try a small window, not sure about Rain Shadow's 10min though.
    It'll take longer than that to remove the beading.
    Originally posted by SallySunshine
    No, you are right. I was thinking uPVC where the beading pops out in thirty seconds. Sorry.
    You can pick your friends and you can pick your nose but you can't pick your friend's nose.
    • Nick_C
    • By Nick_C 13th Mar 17, 10:09 PM
    • 2,721 Posts
    • 3,654 Thanks
    Nick_C
    We bought our house two years ago. It had wooden window frames and many of the panes were misted.

    We new we could just replace the blown panes quite cheaply, but we chose to replace all the DG, doors, guttering and roofline. The style and colour was crucial to us. I would have been disappointed if I had had to live with someone else's choice for the next 20 years. (We went for slim profile frames in anthracite grey. They look amazing)
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